Liver cancer – Rogalevich http://rogalevich.org/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 05:38:47 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://rogalevich.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.png Liver cancer – Rogalevich http://rogalevich.org/ 32 32 Singapore awards grant to NRF to develop new liver cancer therapies https://rogalevich.org/singapore-awards-grant-to-nrf-to-develop-new-liver-cancer-therapies/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 05:38:47 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/singapore-awards-grant-to-nrf-to-develop-new-liver-cancer-therapies/ The team aims to develop preventive interventions for liver cancer using innovative and cutting-edge genomic technology. Image credit: Shutterstock A team of multidisciplinary scientists has been awarded the prestigious National Research Foundation (NRF) Singapore Fellowship to uncover the fundamental mechanisms of liver disease progression from fatty liver to fibrosis/cirrhosis (scarring of the liver) and, possibly […]]]>

The team aims to develop preventive interventions for liver cancer using innovative and cutting-edge genomic technology.

Image credit: Shutterstock

A team of multidisciplinary scientists has been awarded the prestigious National Research Foundation (NRF) Singapore Fellowship to uncover the fundamental mechanisms of liver disease progression from fatty liver to fibrosis/cirrhosis (scarring of the liver) and, possibly liver cancer.

The team aims to identify novel therapeutic targets and biomarkers that can be developed into novel therapies to prevent progression to cancer, as well as biomarkers that can be used to detect and monitor early disease progression to enable rapid preventive interventions. The research is led by the Genome Institute of A*STAR

Singapore (GIS), in collaboration with A*STAR’s Singapore Immunology Network (SIgN), Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore (NUS Medicine), National University Hospital (NUH) and Cancer Science Institute (CSI), SingHealth Duke – Institute of Translational Immunology (TII) at NUS and School of Biological Sciences at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore (NTU Singapore).

Heptacellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common type of primary liver cancer in adults, is also one of the most prevalent cancers in the Asia-Pacific region, including Singapore. In terms of cancer deaths in Singapore, it was ranked third among men and fourth among women from 2011 to 2015.

The team is now motivated to understand the early mechanisms underlying the progression from early liver disease to advanced fibrosis or cirrhosis, and eventually to HCC.

The primary research goal of the project is to generate a comprehensive single-cell catalog of the evolution of disease-associated cell states (both in the hepatic epithelium and the tissue environment) that control the trajectories of disease progression. disease towards HCC.

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US residents of Mexican descent have higher liver cancer risk in successive generations https://rogalevich.org/us-residents-of-mexican-descent-have-higher-liver-cancer-risk-in-successive-generations/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 17:23:29 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/us-residents-of-mexican-descent-have-higher-liver-cancer-risk-in-successive-generations/ Second- and third-generation people living in Los Angeles, California, have a 35% and 61% increased risk of contracting the disease, respectively, according to new study results. The risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in people of Mexican descent living in Los Angeles, California, has increased with each successive generation in the United States, according to study […]]]>

Second- and third-generation people living in Los Angeles, California, have a 35% and 61% increased risk of contracting the disease, respectively, according to new study results.

The risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in people of Mexican descent living in Los Angeles, California, has increased with each successive generation in the United States, according to study results presented at the 15th conference of the AACR on Cancer Science Health Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Disparities Minorities and the Medically Underserved.

The results highlight that place of birth can influence cancer risk and that US-born Hispanics are at greater risk of developing liver cancer than foreign-born Hispanics, due to acculturation.

“Hispanics/Latinos represent one of the largest and fastest growing ethnic groups in the United States. Epidemiological trends show an increased incidence of liver and intrahepatic bile duct cancer in this population for both males and females, while we’re seeing declines for many other cancer sites,” said study lead author Nicholas Acuna, MPH, a doctoral student in epidemiology in the Department of Population & Public Health. Sciences at USC’s Keck School of Medicine, said in a statement.

“It is important to understand the reasons for these trends,” he said.

Investigators leveraged the Multiethnic Cohort, which is a large, prospective, population-based study of risk factors for cancer and other chronic diseases among more than 215,000 participants from 5 American ethnic and racial groups in Los Angeles and Hawaii, and they analyzed how generation status affected HCC risk among people of Mexican descent residing in the city.

Additionally, the analysis focused on self-identified Mexicans who had information about their parents’ place of birth. Generational status was classified as first generation for people born in Mexico with both parents also born in Mexico; second generation for people born in the United States with at least one parent born in Mexico; and third generation for those born in the United States whose two parents were also born in the United States.

HCC risk was assessed after adjusting for age, body mass index (BMI), alcohol and coffee consumption, history of diabetes, gender, and smoking status.

After the average follow-up time of 23.4 years, out of 32,239 people of Mexican descent, there were 220 cases of HCC. In addition, the study found an increase in age-adjusted HCC incidence rates per 100,000 people with each successive generation, from 20.9 cases in first-generation individuals to 27.5 in second generation individuals and 34.7 in third generation individuals.

Second- and third-generation people of Mexican descent had a significantly increased risk of HCC compared to their first-generation counterparts.

Successive generations also showed that people of Mexican descent were more likely to be smokers, to consume more coffee, to have a high BMI and to have higher alcohol consumption.

The study authors also applied a statistical interaction test to assess whether the association between generational status and HCC risk differed by alcohol consumption, BMI status, diabetes, or smoking, but did not did not find any significant differences, which is assumed to be due to the low number of HCC cases.

Third-generation people who did not have diabetes had a significantly higher risk of HCC than first-generation people who did not have diabetes, indicating that multiple risk factors are at play in determining the increased risk of HCC.

“Interventions targeting acculturation and the adoption of negative lifestyle behaviors, such as increased alcohol consumption, unhealthy diets, and smoking, among American-born Mexicans are needed to mitigate risk. increased HCC in this population,” Acuna said.

Limitations of the study included failing to account for different etiologies of HCC, such as alcoholic and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and viral hepatitis B and C. The researchers also focused only on people of Mexican, so the results of the study cannot be generalized to other Latin American countries. subgroups, and future studies are needed.

Reference

Mexican American residents may have a higher risk of liver cancer with each successive generation. Press release. AACR. September 16, 2022. Accessed September 16, 2022. https://aacr.ent.box.com/s/8d84oe5wv64qt3d0i9e909qdf82pw6dh

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US residents of Mexican descent may have a higher risk of liver cancer with each successive generation https://rogalevich.org/us-residents-of-mexican-descent-may-have-a-higher-risk-of-liver-cancer-with-each-successive-generation/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 04:08:00 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/us-residents-of-mexican-descent-may-have-a-higher-risk-of-liver-cancer-with-each-successive-generation/ PHILADELPHIA – The risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) among people of Mexican descent living in Los Angeles has increased with each successive generation in the United States, according to findings presented at the 15th AACR Conference on Cancer Science Health Disparities Among Racial/Ethnic Minorities and the Medically Underserved, September 16-19, 2022. “Hispanics/Latinos represent one of […]]]>

PHILADELPHIA – The risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) among people of Mexican descent living in Los Angeles has increased with each successive generation in the United States, according to findings presented at the 15th AACR Conference on Cancer Science Health Disparities Among Racial/Ethnic Minorities and the Medically Underserved, September 16-19, 2022.

“Hispanics/Latinos represent one of the largest and fastest growing ethnic groups in the United States. Epidemiological trends show an increased incidence of liver and intrahepatic bile duct cancer in this population for both males and females, while we are seeing a decline for many other cancer sites,” said Nicholas Acuna, MPH, doctoral student in epidemiology in the Department of Population & Public Health Sciences at the Keck School of Medicine from USC and lead author of the study, “It’s important to understand the reasons for these trends.”

Studies show that place of birth may influence cancer risk, with US-born Hispanics/Latinos being at greater risk of developing liver cancer than foreign-born Hispanics/Latinos, likely due to acculturation, he said.

Leveraging the Multiethnic Cohort, a large prospective, population-based study of risk factors for cancer and other chronic diseases among more than 215,000 participants from five American racial/ethnic groups in Los Angeles and Hawaii, Acuna and its colleagues studied the impact of generational status on the risk of HCC in people of Mexican descent residing in Los Angeles.

The analysis focused on self-identified Mexicans for whom parental birthplace information was available. Generational status was classified as first generation for people born in Mexico with both parents also born in Mexico; second generation for people born in the United States with at least one parent born in Mexico; and third generation for those born in the United States with both parents also born in the United States

The researchers assessed the risk of HCC after adjusting for age, gender, body mass index (BMI), smoking status, alcohol consumption, history of diabetes and consumption coffee daily.

After an average follow-up of 23.4 years, among 32,239 people of Mexican origin, there were 220 cases of HCC. The study found an increase in age-adjusted HCC incidence rates per 100,000 people with each successive generation, from 20.9 cases in first-generation individuals to 27.5 in second-generation individuals. and 34.7 in third-generation individuals.

Controlling for HCC risk factors, second- and third-generation people of Mexican descent had a significantly increased risk of HCC compared to their first-generation counterparts (35% and 61% higher, respectively).

The study also showed that with successive generations, people of Mexican descent were more likely to be current smokers, to have more alcohol consumption, to consume more coffee and to have a High BMI.

The authors applied a statistical interaction test to assess whether the association between generational status and hepatocellular carcinoma risk differed by smoking status, alcohol consumption, BMI status, or diabetes, but did not found significant differences, possibly because the number of HCC cases was not high.

The researchers also found that third-generation people who did not have diabetes had a much higher risk (82%) of HCC compared to first-generation people who did not have diabetes, indicating that Multiple risk factors come into play to determine the increased risk. of the HCC.

“Interventions targeting acculturation and adoption of negative lifestyle behaviors, such as increased alcohol consumption, unhealthy diets, and smoking, among American-born Mexicans are needed to mitigate risk. increased HCC in this population,” Acuna said.

Limitations of this study include that it did not consider the different etiologies of HCC, including viral hepatitis B and C, alcoholic fatty liver disease, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Additionally, the researchers focused exclusively on participants of Mexican descent, who represent the largest Latino subgroup of the multi-ethnic cohort. Therefore, the results of the study cannot be generalized to other Latin American subgroups and further studies are needed.

This study was funded by the National Cancer Institute. Acuna reports no conflicts of interest.

/Public release. This material from the original organization/authors may be ad hoc in nature, edited for clarity, style and length. The views and opinions expressed are those of the author or authors.View Full here.

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Study – Mouth rot increases liver cancer risk by 75%, start these steps to prevent it https://rogalevich.org/study-mouth-rot-increases-liver-cancer-risk-by-75-start-these-steps-to-prevent-it/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 09:58:34 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/study-mouth-rot-increases-liver-cancer-risk-by-75-start-these-steps-to-prevent-it/ Brushing your teeth is essential to get rid of plaque and remove bits of food stuck between your teeth. Plaque is a white, sticky coating on the teeth that harbors cavity-causing bacteria in the mouth. However, did you know that maintaining oral hygiene can also prevent other harmful diseases?According to a study from Queen’s University […]]]>
Brushing your teeth is essential to get rid of plaque and remove bits of food stuck between your teeth. Plaque is a white, sticky coating on the teeth that harbors cavity-causing bacteria in the mouth. However, did you know that maintaining oral hygiene can also prevent other harmful diseases?

According to a study from Queen’s University Belfast, poor oral hygiene can increase the risk of liver cancer. Researchers have found that people with oral hygiene issues such as sore or bleeding gums, mouth ulcers, and tooth loss 75% higher risk of hepatocellular carcinoma was the most common form of liver cancer.

what is the study

The study analyzed a group of over 469,000 people from the UK to explore the association between oral hygiene problems and the risk of gastrointestinal cancers, such as cancer of the liver, colon, rectum and pancreas.

The researchers found that 4,069 of the participants developed gastrointestinal cancer over a six-year period. In 13% of these cases, patients also reported poor oral hygiene conditions.

What is the link between oral hygiene and liver cancer?

Experts say it could be for two reasons. The first is the role of the oral and intestinal microbiota in the development of the disease. Another reason is that people with poor oral health, such as missing teeth, are unable to eat proper nutritious foods, which increases their risk of liver cancer.

liver cancer symptoms

Liver cancer can present with a number of symptoms such as weight loss, jaundice, abdominal pain and/or swelling. You may also lose your appetite or feel full immediately after eating a small amount of food. Bumps on the right side of your abdomen, right shoulder pain, and itching can also be symptoms of this condition.

what is liver cirrhosis

Cirrhosis is scarring of the liver caused by liver diseases such as hepatitis and excessive alcohol consumption. This usually occurs at a later stage of these diseases and increases the risk of liver cancer. Advanced cirrhosis can also be life-threatening. It is important to be aware of the symptoms of liver disease and to seek immediate treatment. Early diagnosis and treatment can help prevent or limit any further damage.

How to Prevent Liver Cirrhosis

Healthy lifestyle changes are key to preventing liver damage. Limit your alcohol intake and try to drink only occasionally or stop drinking altogether. Maintaining a healthy weight is also important. If you are overweight or obese, try to manage your diet and exercise to reach your healthy weight.

Click here to read this article in English.

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Nanomedicine for liver cancer developed by Amrita researchers obtains a patent in the United States and Australia https://rogalevich.org/nanomedicine-for-liver-cancer-developed-by-amrita-researchers-obtains-a-patent-in-the-united-states-and-australia/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 09:01:13 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/nanomedicine-for-liver-cancer-developed-by-amrita-researchers-obtains-a-patent-in-the-united-states-and-australia/ Insight Post by : Source: PA Date: Sep 13, 2022 Mumbai 13e September 2022: Researchers at the Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham School of Nanoscience and Molecular Medicine have been granted a patent in the United States and Australia for a promising new nanomedicine for the early detection and treatment of cirrhosis and tumors of the liver. […]]]>

Insight

  • Post by :
  • Source: PA
  • Date: Sep 13, 2022

Mumbai 13e September 2022: Researchers at the Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham School of Nanoscience and Molecular Medicine have been granted a patent in the United States and Australia for a promising new nanomedicine for the early detection and treatment of cirrhosis and tumors of the liver. The invention is the result of a research project funded by the Nanobiotechnology Task Force of the Department of Biotechnology, Government. from India.

Dr Shantikumar V Nair and teacher Dr. Manzoor Koyakutty from the Amrita School of Nanosciences & Molecular Medicine in Kochi led a team of four researchers – Dr. Anusha Ashokan, Dr. Ida M Anna, Dr. Vijay Harish, Dr. Badrinath Sridharan – to create a special type of nanomedicine that responds to radio wave signals sent from outside the body. Once the nanoparticles are injected into a tumor, they can be heated using medically approved external radio waves. Doctors can view the tumor using an MRI machine and burn it in a controlled manner.

The drug, which is triggered by external radio waves, can be used not only for medical imaging of tumors, but also for targeted drug delivery.

Amrita researchers have demonstrated that the new technology can be used for the early detection of liver cirrhosis and liver tumor, image-guided treatment at an early stage of liver tumor using of radiofrequency ablation therapy as well as labeling and tracking the movement of stem cells inside the body after stem cell transplantation to assess the effectiveness of therapy.

Said Dr. Manzoor Koyakutty, Professor, Amrita Center for Nanosciences and Molecular Medicine: “We have created a unique nanomedicine that can be used for medical imaging, combined with drug delivery. Its particles consist of synthetically prepared calcium phosphate, a biomineral found in our bones. Generally, chemically prepared inorganic nanoparticles pose safety concerns when used as nanomedicines. However, as a biomineral, calcium phosphate is biocompatible and biodegradable, so completely safe for humans.

He added: “We engineered the nanoparticles through a process called ‘doping’ where a few hundred calcium atoms are replaced with iron atoms. This makes the material “magnetic” and so its movement inside our body can be visualized with a device such as MRI. Using this property, we have demonstrated the early detection of liver cirrhosis and liver tumor. In another study, we showed the therapeutic application of this nanomedicine in the treatment of liver tumors by thermal ablation (burning) of cancerous cells by activating the nanoparticles using radiofrequency waves.

Speaking of another application of the invention, Dr Shantikumar V Nair, Dean of Amrita School of Nanosciences and Molecular Medicine said: “We have labeled stem cells with these nanoparticles and demonstrated the possibility of following their movements in the brain by MRI, after stem cell transplant therapy. At present, doctors cannot see the fate of stem cells after transplantation. But calcium phosphate nanoparticles can give stem cells magnetic contrast under MRI, so we can visually estimate whether stem cells are migrating to the site of damage. This helps us to understand whether or not stem cell therapy has been effective for a patient.

Dr Shantikumar V Nair said two key features make Amrita nano-medicine unique. “First, it makes nanomedicine imageable inside our body using medical imaging modalities such as MRI. Second, we can activate these nanoparticles externally using radio frequency waves. This allows us to see the precise location of nanomedicine particles inside the body and activate them from the outside when they are exactly at the site of a disease like cancer. These features are not available in any other nanomedicine available today.

He added, “We are currently investigating the potential application of these nanoparticles in cancer immunotherapy with the support of the Biotechnology Industry Research Assistance Council (BIRAC) and an Indo-Swiss collaboration with the Institute Ludwig Cancer Research Center, University of Lausanne and University of Geneva, Switzerland. With support from the Department of Biotechnology, Govt. from India, we are currently testing regulatory safety studies in large animal models. We plan to conduct human trials of nanomedicine within the next year.

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Liver cancer: The red flag when going to the bathroom hinting at advanced stage cancer https://rogalevich.org/liver-cancer-the-red-flag-when-going-to-the-bathroom-hinting-at-advanced-stage-cancer/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 10:24:00 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/liver-cancer-the-red-flag-when-going-to-the-bathroom-hinting-at-advanced-stage-cancer/ Liver cancer is most common in people with liver disease, a common condition in the UK. Liver cancer is among the most serious forms of the disease and in some cases may not be curable. But acting quickly when warning signs appear can lead to a positive outcome. According to various health organizations, hormonal changes […]]]>

Liver cancer is most common in people with liver disease, a common condition in the UK. Liver cancer is among the most serious forms of the disease and in some cases may not be curable. But acting quickly when warning signs appear can lead to a positive outcome. According to various health organizations, hormonal changes in the body could make stools bulky, pale, and greasy.

One of the most apparent symptoms of liver cancer is weight loss, which is also symptomatic of several other cancers.

Symptoms vary depending on the exact location of the cancer, and some symptoms like jaundice can cause their own subset of signs, like itching.

Since many symptoms are vague, such as nausea and loss of appetite, the disease can be quite difficult to detect early.

Since the liver controls the production of bile, a malignant tumor in the organ is also likely to produce noticeable changes when using the toilet.

READ MORE: Fatty liver disease: carbs could be a trigger

At the first stage of the disease, the tumor has not yet grown beyond two centimeters and has not grown into blood vessels.

However, as it progresses, it spreads to other lymph nodes in the body, eventually invading surrounding tissues, making the disease harder to fight with treatment.

Unfortunately, it is at this stage that symptoms are most likely to appear.

The American Cancer Society explains, “If cancer blocks the release of bile and pancreatic juices in the intestine, a person may not be able to digest fatty foods.

DO NOT MISS :

“Undigested fat can also cause stools to be abnormally pale. They can also be bulky, greasy, and float in the toilet.”

Another common side effect of liver cancer is a buildup of bilirubin in the blood, which is often caused by a blocked bile duct.

This buildup in the blood is characterized by jaundice, which can lead to yellowing of the skin and the whites of the eyes.

Several other alterations in hormone levels are likely to occur, according to the American Cancer Society.

This can lead to :

  • High calcium levels, which can cause nausea, confusion, constipation, muscle weakness or problems
  • Low blood sugar, which can cause fatigue and fainting
  • Breast enlargement and/or testicular shrinkage in men
  • High red blood cell count, which can make someone look red and flushed
  • High cholesterol level.

READ MORE: Liver Cancer Symptoms: Three Signs About Your Eating Habits

How to detect liver cancer

Any suspicious body changes should warrant further investigation by a medical professional.

A doctor may perform a series of blood and imaging tests, or take a sample of liver tissue for examination.

If a biopsy gives positive results, further treatments may vary depending on the stage of the disease.

Treatments for primary liver cancer include:

  • Operation
  • Radiotherapy
  • Targeted drug therapy
  • Chemotherapy
  • Immunotherapy.
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HLB’s cancer drug candidate has world’s longest survival time against liver cancer https://rogalevich.org/hlbs-cancer-drug-candidate-has-worlds-longest-survival-time-against-liver-cancer/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 04:01:02 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/hlbs-cancer-drug-candidate-has-worlds-longest-survival-time-against-liver-cancer/ HLB Logo (HLB) HLB’s precision cancer drug Rivoceranib has demonstrated the world’s longest median overall survival, or mOS, in Phase 3 clinical trials for liver cancer, the South Korean biopharmaceutical company announced Thursday. According to HLB, Rivoceranib’s mOS recorded 22.1 months to mark the world’s first drug to break the 20-month barrier against liver cancer. […]]]>

HLB Logo (HLB)

HLB’s precision cancer drug Rivoceranib has demonstrated the world’s longest median overall survival, or mOS, in Phase 3 clinical trials for liver cancer, the South Korean biopharmaceutical company announced Thursday.

According to HLB, Rivoceranib’s mOS recorded 22.1 months to mark the world’s first drug to break the 20-month barrier against liver cancer.

The company earlier published the summary of the concurrent Phase 3 clinical trials of Rivoceranib and the cancer drug Camrelizumab, a day before the start of the European Society for Medical Oncology which is due to take place in Paris from Friday to Tuesday.

HLB stated that Rivoceranib also showed superior data in terms of median progression-free survival, overall response rate, disease control rate and duration of response compared to the control group, indicating the statistical significance of the clinical trials .

According to HLB, the risk ratio of Rivoceranib showed that patients’ risk of death was reduced by 40-50%. It marked the safest test results to date compared to clinical trial numbers of previously approved cancer drugs, the company said.

Concurrent Phase 3 clinical trials of Rivoceranib have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. The tests were carried out on 543 patients in 13 countries, including the United States, Europe, China and South Korea.

In order to obtain FDA New Drug Approval for Rivoceranib, HLB requested a pre-New Drug Application meeting with the FDA last month. The company expects the meeting to take place before mid-October.

Liver cancer is an incurable disease for which it is very difficult to develop treatments. The incidence rate is the sixth highest among all cancers, while the five-year survival rate is only 38%, about half of the total average for cancer patients. This makes (liver cancer research) an area where we urgently need to develop innovative treatments to treat patients with various conditions,” said Jang In-keun, Vice President of Bio Strategic Planning Division at HLB.

“As the clinical results of Rivoceranib confirmed that the patient’s survival period has improved significantly with the high response rate, we will do our best to get the new drug approved quickly.”

By Kan Hyeong-woo (hwkan@heraldcorp.com)

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“Forever Chemicals” and Liver Cancer: Don’t Lose Sleep Just Yet https://rogalevich.org/forever-chemicals-and-liver-cancer-dont-lose-sleep-just-yet/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 15:26:13 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/forever-chemicals-and-liver-cancer-dont-lose-sleep-just-yet/ If the media tells you that a group of chemicals is dangerous, be skeptical. The compounds in question may indeed be harmful, but there is a good chance that they are reasonably safe and improve our lives. The so-called “chemicals forever” are perhaps the best example of this. Less commonly known as per- and polyfluoroalkyl […]]]>

If the media tells you that a group of chemicals is dangerous, be skeptical. The compounds in question may indeed be harmful, but there is a good chance that they are reasonably safe and improve our lives. The so-called “chemicals forever” are perhaps the best example of this. Less commonly known as per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), they are find in a wide variety of products that we use every day without incident, ranging from carpets to cell phones and pacemakers.

Yet journalists, often activated by scientists and regulators, can’t help but publish hyperbolic stories about PFAS. Consider this recent example from The New York Post: “Forever Chemicals in Cookware Linked to Liver Cancer in First Human Study.” Headline without context in place, the newspaper continues:

A new study that examined the correlation between liver cancer and the presence of these chemicals in humans found that those most exposed were 350% more likely to eventually develop the disease.

The researchers involved should have made a comment that qualifies their findings, something like, “Our findings are interesting, but they need to be replicated before we can say anything more conclusive.” Instead, the Post rehashed this quote from the press release that accompanied the study:

We believe our work provides important insights into the long-term effects of these chemicals on human health, particularly regarding how they can damage normal liver function,” said author Dr. Leda Chatzi. of the study. “This study fills an important gap in our understanding of the true consequences of exposure to these chemicals.”

It’s a bit exaggerated. Dr. Chazti’s study tells us nothing about the long-term effects of PFAS exposure; indeed, its design made it incapable of doing so. But that’s only the beginning of the problems with this paper. Let’s take a closer look at some of its serious limitations.

What did they find?

The researchers carried out a nested case-control study involving 50 patients diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and 50 unaffected controls [1]. The data came from Multiethnic Cohort Study (MEC); cases and controls were matched by age, sex, race/ethnicity, and study area. The researchers then “examined the associations of PFAS exposure, altered metabolic pathways, and risk of nonviral HCC.” Conclusion:

This is the first prospective study to demonstrate that exposure to PFAS was associated with the risk of HCC. The results of this proof-of-concept study suggest that exposure to PFAS may play an important role in the pathology of HCC.

The problems abound. First, the study evaluated a variety of compounds, but the results were statistically significant for only oneperfluorooctane sulfonic acid aka PFOS (Table 3). Participants with plasma PFOS levels above 54.9 μg/L had a 4.5 times higher risk of developing HCC. But that’s a huge number, well above the 1.4 ug/L seen in the general US population, as our resident toxicologist Susan Goldhaber explained in an email. Incidentally, exposure to this particular chemical decreased by 85 percent since 1999. Over time, we are exposed to smaller and smaller amounts of the only compound in the study that may have posed a risk for liver cancer.

The other important issue is that exposure to PFASs can change over time, influencing the degree of risk a person faces. It is therefore very important to take variable exposure into account. How did the researchers do this? They did not do it. “…We were only able to measure PFAS at one time point,” they noted near the end of the article. On a related note, Table 2 shows that cases and controls had very similar plasma concentrations of each class of compounds in question; the figures for PFOS were identical. The study did not actually have a control group in this regard.

What do other studies show?

The evidence is limited, but a 2009 study conducted in Denmark sheds light on the PFOS-liver cancer association. These researchers followed a cohort of 57,053 people for 13 years; only 67 people developed liver cancer. PFOS and PFOA concentrations were measured in a sub-cohort of 772 people. Conclusion:

Plasma concentrations of perfluorooctanoate and perfluorooctanesulfonate in the general Danish population do not appear to be associated with a risk of cancer of the prostate, bladder, pancreas or liver.

The authors of the new paper dismissed these findings, saying “HCC cases likely accounted for a small portion of the total number of liver cancer cases.” It’s not particularly compelling, however. All that means is that there was Too few cases of HCC to associate the disease with exposure to PFOS.

We must also consider the known causes of HCC. When we do, we find that hepatitis B and C infections are responsible for the majority of HCC cases worldwide, followed by non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). My colleague, Dr. Chuck Dinerstein, pointed out that China, for example, has 600% more liver cancer cases than the United States per 100,000 people. “About 80% of [China’s] liver cancer cases have been attributed to chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection,” this 2017 study Explain. According to a July 2021 paper also based on the Multiethics Cohort Study, race significantly influences how someone develop HCC:

African Americans (AA) (59.5%) and Latinos (40.6%) were more likely to be diagnosed with HCC related to HCV. Among Japanese Americans (33.1%), Native Hawaiians (39.1%), and Whites (34.8%), NAFLD was the most common etiology.

Curiously, obesity and diabetes, two important risk factors for liver cancer, were much more frequent in the cases included in the present study (see table 1). The contribution of PFOS exposure to liver cancer risk, if any, is very small considering these variables.

Remember that we still don’t know if exposure to PFOS causes liver damage. Several mechanisms have been proposed; however, there this is not very good data behind one of them. Until we have better evidence, don’t lose sleep over your exposure to this or any other chemical “forever”.

[1] See This article for the context of the study design.

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Drinking sugary drinks increases the risk of liver cancer https://rogalevich.org/drinking-sugary-drinks-increases-the-risk-of-liver-cancer/ Sun, 04 Sep 2022 12:49:40 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/drinking-sugary-drinks-increases-the-risk-of-liver-cancer/ The researchers analyzed data from 90,504 postmenopausal women who had participated in the Women’s Health Initiative.iStock (Representative image)By: Kimberly Rodrigues A recent study of over 90,000 postmenopausal women found that those who drank at least one sugary drink a day had a 78% higher risk of developing liver cancer compared to those who drank (less […]]]>

The researchers analyzed data from 90,504 postmenopausal women who had participated in the Women’s Health Initiative.

iStock (Representative image)

By: Kimberly Rodrigues

A recent study of over 90,000 postmenopausal women found that those who drank at least one sugary drink a day had a 78% higher risk of developing liver cancer compared to those who drank (less than three) such drinks per month.

Liver cancer has been linked to poor lifestyle choices. Therefore, the aim of the recent study, published in Current Developments in Nutrition, was to determine whether sugary drinks play a role.

Longgang Zhao, a PhD student at the University of South Carolina, the lead author of the study is quoted as saying, “Our results suggest that consumption of sugary drinks is a potentially modifiable risk factor for liver cancer,” Express reports. .

He adds: “If our results are confirmed, reducing the consumption of sugary drinks could serve as a public health strategy to reduce the burden of liver cancer. Replacing sugary drinks with water and unsweetened coffee or tea could significantly reduce the risk of liver cancer.

As part of the study, researchers analyzed data from 90,504 postmenopausal women who had participated in the Women’s Health Initiative, which was a long-term study started in the early 1990s.

Participants were asked to complete baseline questionnaires (in the mid-1990s) and were followed for a median of 18 years, meaning that half of the participants were followed longer and the other half for less of time.

It was found that 7% of participants reported drinking (one or more 12-ounce servings) of sugar-sweetened beverages daily. Thus, a total of 205 women among the participants developed liver cancer during follow-up.

Additionally, among those who drank (one or more sugary drinks) per day, they were 78% more likely to develop liver cancer and participants who drank (at least one soft drink per day) were 73% more likely of developing liver cancer. cancer, compared to those who never drank these drinks or who drank less than three per month.

Diagnoses of liver cancer were confirmed using participants’ medical records.

However, despite these findings, the researchers reportedly pointed out that this study cannot prove that sugary drinks cause liver cancer, only that there appears to be a link between regular consumption of sugary drinks and cancer.

They cautioned that the study is observational and was not designed to determine whether sugary drinks actually cause liver cancer, or whether consumption of sugary drinks is an indicator of other lifestyle factors that drive to liver cancer.

The researchers reportedly noted that sugary drinks may lead to an increased risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes, two risk factors for liver cancer.

These sugary drinks also contribute to an impaired insulin response and fat accumulation in the liver, two factors in liver health.

Speaking of the link between sugary drinks and liver cancer, Zhao reportedly said, “The consumption of sugary drinks, a postulated risk factor for obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease, can lead to insulin resistance and inflammation that are strongly involved in the liver. carcinogenesis”.

According to Cancer Research UK, there is no evidence that sugar directly causes cancer. However, the association adds that there is an indirect link between the risk of developing cancer and sugar consumption.

They reportedly said, “Eating a lot of sugar over time can make you gain weight, and strong scientific evidence shows that being overweight or obese increases the risk of 13 different types of cancer.

In addition, in a previous study (in 2019), Cancer Research mentioned that people who consumed more sugary drinks had a slightly increased risk of cancer, regardless of their body weight.

He adds: “The study took weight into account, but there are still a lot of unanswered questions.”

Although the study “suggests there might be something else going on,” more studies will be needed to investigate this, he concludes.

Samantha Heller, senior clinical nutritionist at NYU Langone Health in New York, in an earlier report in US News in June, reportedly said it’s hard to tell from the study whether the relationship between sugary drinks and cancer liver damage isn’t just a marker of an unhealthy lifestyle.

“The question is: what are the lifestyles of people who consume at least one 12-ounce sugary drink a day?” she noted. “Is this population more likely to eat less fiber, fewer fruits and vegetables, and more likely to eat more red and processed meat, junk food, and fast food, and less likely to exercise? “

She also said there is a big gap between consuming one or more sugary drinks per day and three servings per month.

“All of this said, sodas, fruit drinks and other sugary drinks have no nutritional value, contribute to overweight and obesity and several associated chronic diseases.”

“There’s no reason to drink them except that we’ve gotten used to it and are encouraged to keep drinking them by the media and advertising campaigns.

“Water, seltzer, teas, herbal teas, and even a splash of 100% fruit juice with water or seltzer are healthier choices,” he said. she stated.

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AHN Adds Innovative Liver Cancer Treatment and Cancer Fitness Program to Range of Services Available in North Hills https://rogalevich.org/ahn-adds-innovative-liver-cancer-treatment-and-cancer-fitness-program-to-range-of-services-available-in-north-hills/ Thu, 01 Sep 2022 17:48:28 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/ahn-adds-innovative-liver-cancer-treatment-and-cancer-fitness-program-to-range-of-services-available-in-north-hills/ North Hills residents can now get life-saving treatment for liver cancer at AHN Wexford Hospital in Pine instead of having to travel to Pittsburgh. The health system is also expanding the role that exercise and nutrition can play in treating cancer patients and survivors with a new facility in the North Hills led by a […]]]>

North Hills residents can now get life-saving treatment for liver cancer at AHN Wexford Hospital in Pine instead of having to travel to Pittsburgh.

The health system is also expanding the role that exercise and nutrition can play in treating cancer patients and survivors with a new facility in the North Hills led by a physician with unique expertise.

Allegheny Health Network officials say providing better access to treatments for liver cancer is critical because it is often not detected until later stages.

Liver cancer cases are also nearly three times higher in men than in women, according to the American Cancer Society.

Although less common in the United States, liver cancer is also among the deadliest forms of cancer in the world, hospital officials said.

Since symptoms of liver cancer are often not present in the early stages of the disease, treatment can be difficult when it is eventually detected, as the tumors are often too large to be removed by traditional surgical means, according to the doctors.

Often, advanced-stage liver cancer does not respond to chemotherapy treatment, they say.

To combat these problems, minimally invasive radiation therapy that was used at the AHN University Cancer Institute at Allegheny General Hospital is offered at the AHN Cancer Institute at the hospital. of Wexford.

Known as Yttrium-90, or Y90, the process of “radioembolization” is a minimally invasive treatment that combines embolization and high-dose radiation therapy to target inoperable tumors in the liver, hospital officials say. .

Embolization is a procedure in which the substances are injected directly into an artery in the liver to block or reduce blood flow to a tumor, according to the American Cancer Society.

“Not only can Y90 radioembolization significantly prolong and improve the quality of life of liver cancer patients, but it represents a potential lifeline if curative surgery is made possible,” said Dr Andrew Klobuka, who recently performed the first Y90 procedure at AHN Wexford.

Klobuka is the chief radiologist at the AHN Liver Cancer Center of Excellence at Allegheny General Hospital on the North Side.

During treatment, the radioactive isotope yttrium-90 is delivered through catheters directly to tumors without affecting healthy parts of the body, hospital officials said.

The procedure is designed to slow the growth of tumors and increase the chances that a tumor can be surgically removed.

Liver cancer patients and family members who want more information about the Y90 therapy offered by AHN can call 412-442-2459. To schedule a cancer-related appointment at AHN or speak with a nurse about cancer diagnoses, treatments, and side effects, call the AHN Cancer Helpline at 412-NURSE-4-U or 412-687- 7348.

Treat the whole patient

AHN officials also announced the addition of Dr. Colin Champ, radiation oncologist who specializes in the role nutrition and fitness can play in improving the lives of cancer patients and survivors.

Champ will lead a unique exercise oncology program that aims to reduce the side effects of cancer treatments to improve patients’ quality of life and treatment outcomes, according to hospital officials.

The program is offered in a new 2,650 square foot health and fitness center located on the AGH Suburban campus in Bellevue.

Champ will also practice radiation oncology at AHN’s Wexford Health + Wellness Pavilion, located adjacent to AHN Hospital Wexford along the Perry Freeway.

“I am thrilled to join such an innovative and patient-centric oncology team at AHN, while having the opportunity to create a new exercise program for cancer survivors,” Champ said. “I’m passionate about healthy eating and exercise, and my goal is to give patients the tools they need to take charge of their own health, now and in the future.

“As clinicians and researchers, I believe we have only just scratched the surface of learning how physical fitness and good nutrition can positively impact the lives of our patients,” he said. -he declares.

Champ was previously an associate professor at the Duke Cancer Institute, where his research focused on the interactions between diet, exercise and metabolism.

The research also assessed whether strength training and other exercises helped improve overall health and cancer-specific outcomes in patients treated for breast cancer and lymphoma, hospital officials said.

Studies have found evidence that higher levels of physical activity are linked to a lower risk of several types of cancer, including cancers of the bladder, breast, colon, endometrium, esophagus , kidney and stomach, according to the National Cancer Institute.

Obesity has also been shown to be a risk factor for a number of types of cancer and can affect a patient’s quality of life and the likelihood of the cancer coming back, according to the NCI.

“Dr. Champ brings to the AHN Cancer Institute a unique combination of expertise in radiation oncology and knowledge of the interplay between fitness, nutrition and cancer,” said Dr. David L. Bartlett, who chairs the AHN Cancer Institute “His work aligns well with our philosophy of treating the patient as a whole, not just the disease.”

The fitness program at AGH Suburban will initially be open to a limited number of patients who have been referred by their doctor, hospital officials said.

Tony LaRussa is a staff writer for Tribune-Review. You can contact Tony by email at tlarussa@triblive.com or via Twitter .

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