Liver cancer – Rogalevich http://rogalevich.org/ Thu, 26 May 2022 21:17:57 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://rogalevich.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.png Liver cancer – Rogalevich http://rogalevich.org/ 32 32 Molecular profiling identifies new high-risk subtype of pediatric liver cancer https://rogalevich.org/molecular-profiling-identifies-new-high-risk-subtype-of-pediatric-liver-cancer/ Thu, 26 May 2022 18:01:25 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/molecular-profiling-identifies-new-high-risk-subtype-of-pediatric-liver-cancer/ Until recently, almost all pediatric liver cancers were classified as hepatoblastoma or hepatocellular carcinoma. However, pediatric pathologists have observed that some liver tumors have histological features that do not readily match either of these two models of carcinoma. These cancers are less likely to respond to chemotherapy and patient outcomes are poor. First author Dr. […]]]>

Until recently, almost all pediatric liver cancers were classified as hepatoblastoma or hepatocellular carcinoma. However, pediatric pathologists have observed that some liver tumors have histological features that do not readily match either of these two models of carcinoma. These cancers are less likely to respond to chemotherapy and patient outcomes are poor.

First author Dr. Pavel Sumazin, associate professor of pediatrics at Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children’s Cancer and Hematology Center, and his colleagues sought to better characterize this high-risk cancer.

The researchers examined the molecular profiles of the tumors, including genetic alterations and gene expression profiles. They found that these profiles do not fit into the molecular categories of hepatoblastoma (HB) or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Instead, these tumors exhibited recurrent molecular features that have been observed in both HB and HCC. They designated these tumors as hepatoblastomas with features of hepatocellular carcinoma (HBC).

The team also looked at HBC treatments and outcomes and found that they tended to be more resistant to standard chemotherapy and to have poor outcomes when left untreated with more aggressive surgical approaches, including the transplant. Based on their findings, the team proposed a diagnostic algorithm to stratify HBCs and guide specialized treatment.

“Our results highlight the importance of molecular testing to accurately classify these tumors to optimize treatment recommendations at the time of initial diagnosis,” said Dr. Dolores López-Terrada, corresponding author of the paper, professor of pathology , Immunology and Pediatrics at Baylor and Chief of the Division of Genomic Medicine at Texas Children’s. “Our analysis suggested that children with CHB may benefit from treatment strategies that differ from guidelines for patients with hepatoblastoma and hepatocellular carcinoma.”

Find all the details of this study in the Journal of Hepatology.

Sumazin and López-Terrada are both members of the Dan L Duncan Comprehensive Cancer Center at Baylor. Other Baylor and Texas Children’s authors include Tricia L. Peters, Stephen F. Sarabia, Hyunjae R. Kim, Martin Urbicain, Emporia Faith Hollingsworth, Karla R. Alvarez, Cintia R. Perez, Mohammad Javad Najaf Panah, Jessica L. Epps, Kathy Scorsone, Barry Zorman, Sarah E. Woodfield, John A. Goss, Sanjeev A. Vasudevan, Andras Heczey, Angshumoy Roy, Kevin E. Fisher, Kalyani R. Patel, and Milton J. Finegold. Howard Katzenstein, Allison F. O’Neill, Rebecka Meyers, Greg Tiao, Jim Geller, Sarangarajan Ranganathan, Arun A. Rangaswami, all members of the Children’s Oncology Group Liver Tumor Committee, and Rita Alaggio and Alice Pozza also contributed. They come from the following institutions: Wolfson Children’s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston Children’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Primary Children’s Hospital, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, University of California San Francisco and Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital.

This work was funded by the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas (RP180674), European Union Horizon 2020 (826121), Schindler Foundation, and National Cancer Institute (R21CA223140).

Source of the story:

Materials provided by Baylor College of Medicine. Original written by Molly Chiu. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

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Kenya secures 62 million shillings for North Rift liver cancer project https://rogalevich.org/kenya-secures-62-million-shillings-for-north-rift-liver-cancer-project/ Tue, 24 May 2022 21:00:08 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/kenya-secures-62-million-shillings-for-north-rift-liver-cancer-project/ health and fitness Kenya secures 62 million shillings for North Rift liver cancer project Wednesday, May 25, 2022 By PAULINE KAIRUMore from this author Summary The MTRH will receive specialized equipment in the surgical treatment of cancer, while surgeons, clinicians and technicians will be trained locally, in Peru and in Paris. Every year, about 920 […]]]>

health and fitness

Kenya secures 62 million shillings for North Rift liver cancer project


Summary

  • The MTRH will receive specialized equipment in the surgical treatment of cancer, while surgeons, clinicians and technicians will be trained locally, in Peru and in Paris.
  • Every year, about 920 Kenyans are diagnosed with liver cancer and 850 die from it, according to the latest data from the World Health Organization.
  • Medical staff will be trained in identifying risk factors and early diagnosis of liver cancer.

Kenya will soon begin performing delicate liver cancer surgeries at the Moi Referral and Teaching Hospital (MTRH) after three counties in the North Rift were selected for research and training in the disease which is causing many deaths in the region.

France is funding a project on liver cancer to the tune of 62 million shillings while Peru will train Kenyan specialists. The MTRH will receive specialized equipment in the surgical treatment of cancer, while surgeons, clinicians and technicians will be trained locally, in Peru and in Paris.

Every year, about 920 Kenyans are diagnosed with liver cancer and 850 die from it, according to the latest data from the World Health Organization. It ranks ninth among the deadliest cancers, due to the delay in diagnosis and the lack of specialists to treat the threat.

Dr. Fatma Some, a medical specialist at Moi University, said the studies carried out showed that “a large portion of our patients come from Uasin Gishu, Baringo and Elgeyo Marakwet counties.”

“They have a high prevalence of hepatitis B and have had outbreaks at times. We will now work with these counties to identify patients and develop a referral system. We also have patients coming to MTRH from other counties across the country who will be included,” she said.

The two-year project will focus on Baringo, Uasin Gishu and Elgeyo Marakwet counties, codenamed Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC) in Western Kenya, due to the prevalence of the disease in these areas. Medical staff will be trained in identifying risk factors and early diagnosis of liver cancer.

Dr Some said Peru had identified an innovative way to treat huge tumors in advanced liver cancer, surgery which has been avoided here in Kenya due to the delicate nature of the organ, the risks associated with surgery and lack of equipment.

“The liver has a lot of blood supply, so the surgery is very delicate. It needs specialized equipment that we will be able to acquire through this project. Peruvian surgeons will transfer technology by training our surgeons in this technique that ‘they use to successfully excise huge tumors,’ she said at the signing of the grant agreement between the French Embassy and other stakeholders last Wednesday.

“We will have two surgeons trained in Peru, followed by further training of the surgical team and theater personnel in the field by the Peruvian surgical team during a return visit. Two lab technicians will travel to the famous Institut Pasteur in Paris for further training in advanced lab techniques,” she said.

Physicians, oncologists, pathologists and radiologists come from both Moi University and MTRH, which also partner with French researchers.

According to the Deputy Head of Cooperation and Attaché for Science and Higher Education at the French Embassy in Kenya, Dr. Mathieu Guérin, the project will equip health professionals with clinical skills to make early diagnoses of chronic diseases. liver.

The French Ministry of Foreign Affairs will finance the installation of innovative laboratory equipment intended to improve the monitoring and diagnostic capacities of chronic liver diseases at the MTRH where the project will be based.

The Institut Pasteur and the Peruvian National Cancer Institute (INEN) will provide the training.

If the project succeeds in taming deaths from liver cancer, also known as hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), it will be replicated in other counties.

“The idea is to develop a kind of model that can be replicated in other counties and for that we will ask KEMRI to evaluate the project so that we can see what worked, what did not work , then after that it will be up to the Ministry of Health to decide whether or not they want to extend it to the rest of the country,” said Dr Guerin.

In Kenya, more than 60% of liver cancers in Kenya are associated with hepatitis B (HBV) infection.

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What is Zantac and can it cause liver cancer? https://rogalevich.org/what-is-zantac-and-can-it-cause-liver-cancer/ Fri, 20 May 2022 08:40:36 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/what-is-zantac-and-can-it-cause-liver-cancer/ A simple medicine to treat heartburn may be linked to cancer. Zantac, a ranitidine drug, has garnered attention for all the wrong reasons. Problems with its makers began to escalate in late 2019 when several reports were linked to its likelihood of causing various types of cancer. In this article, we will discuss what Zantac […]]]>

A simple medicine to treat heartburn may be linked to cancer.

Zantac, a ranitidine drug, has garnered attention for all the wrong reasons. Problems with its makers began to escalate in late 2019 when several reports were linked to its likelihood of causing various types of cancer.

In this article, we will discuss what Zantac is and what it does, and talk about the possibility of Zantac users with bladder cancer Let’s dive into it.

What exactly is Zantac?

Since its release in the 1980s, Zantac has been consumed, marketed, and considered safe in the medical fraternity. Many people suffering from illnesses such as indigestion, heartburn, GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease)and others have been using the drug for years or even decades to treat their symptoms.

Zantac (ranitidine) belongs to the histamine-2 blocker class of medications. It helps reduce the amount of acid produced by your gut. It has traditionally been used to treat and prevent intestinal and intestinal ulcers. It has also been used to treat Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, a disorder in which the stomach generates excessive amounts of acid.

Why was Zantac taken off the drug market?

When ranitidine is stored at extreme temperatures, contaminating carcinogenic NDMA present in many ranitidine drugs such as Zantac can accumulate in large quantities. These high amounts can be harmful to the user. There are limited studies on NDMA, but researchers are noticing some links to cancer in mouse models.

This led the FDA to order all manufacturers of ranitidine to remove the drug from the US market. The main reason for this is that using Zantac may increase your risk of cancer due to NDMA, as mentioned above.

Regular use of Zantac can lead to many types of cancer, including liver cancer. The assumption is that the drug is metabolized by the liver, which may lead to the formation of NDMA.

This NDMA can then be transported through the bloodstream. Since the generation of NDMA after taking Zantac (Ranitidine) can occur in multiple parts of the body, it may be linked to a variety of malignancies.

Not found by the FDA, but an online pharmacy

The problem of ranitidine-induced liver cancer and severe liver damage has not come to the attention of the FDA or the pharmaceutical companies. Instead, it was Valisure, an online pharmacy, that did the government service of informing the public of this important situation.

Valisure’s approach is to purchase pharmaceutical items and test them independently. The company is dedicated to public safety and has discovered contamination in several well-known pharmaceutical products.

Ranitidine contains NDMA

Just when word of the NDMA (N-Nitrosodimethylamine) contamination reached Valisure, pharmaceutical manufacturers and stores themselves reacted quickly. The drug companies that developed the cheap Zantac and ranitidine, according to lawsuits, had long known their drugs contained a cancer-causing chemical.

Liver cancer and Zantac

Liver cancer is defined as cancer that starts in the cells of your liver. The liver is a huge organ located in the upper right part of your belly, below the diaphragm and above the stomach.

Several malignant tumors can arise in the liver. Hepatocellular carcinoma is the most common type of liver cancer and it begins in the main type of liver cell called the hepatocyte. Hepatoblastoma and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma are two less common types of liver cancer. While in some cases, liver cancer is treatable, the mortality rate associated with the disease is alarming.

Currently, there is no way to know how likely you are to have liver damage after taking Zantac. However, there is some evidence that the NDMA in Zantac may increase the risk of developing liver problems.

If you or someone close to you has taken Zantac regularly for a medical condition and has had major liver problems, you may have the right to join a class action lawsuit against the makers of Zantac.

Zantac has been linked to a variety of cancers

People who have developed the following cancers as a result of persistent and prolonged use of Zantac or comparable ranitidine medicines may be eligible for compensation, in addition to liver cancer:

  • Bladder cancer is a type of cancer that affects the bladder
  • Stomach cancer
  • Esophageal and colon cancer
  • Kidney/kidney cancer
  • Leukemia
  • Multiple myeloma
  • Non-Hodgkin lymphoma
  • Pancreatic carcinoma is a type of cancer that affects the pancreas
  • Prostate cancer is a type of cancer that affects men
  • Small intestine cancer

Conclusion

Zantac is no longer available in the market due to various legal claims from cancer patients who were diagnosed as a result of its prolonged use. Just like many other cancer claims, the claims of Zantac causing liver cancer are not yet fully proven. But there are reported cases where regular use of Zantac has led to liver problems. Science will know more in the years to come.

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Study in mice significantly slowed tumor growth and activated anti-tumor immune response https://rogalevich.org/study-in-mice-significantly-slowed-tumor-growth-and-activated-anti-tumor-immune-response/ Wed, 18 May 2022 20:17:36 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/study-in-mice-significantly-slowed-tumor-growth-and-activated-anti-tumor-immune-response/ Researchers at the University of Missouri School of Medicine have discovered a specific combination immunotherapy that shows promise in the fight against liver cancer. The therapy involves a tumor-suppressing lipid molecule called nanoliposome C6-ceramide (LipC6) and an antibody against cytotoxic T cell antigen 4 (CTLA4). When used together in this study, LipC6 and the anti-CTLA4 […]]]>

Researchers at the University of Missouri School of Medicine have discovered a specific combination immunotherapy that shows promise in the fight against liver cancer.

The therapy involves a tumor-suppressing lipid molecule called nanoliposome C6-ceramide (LipC6) and an antibody against cytotoxic T cell antigen 4 (CTLA4). When used together in this study, LipC6 and the anti-CTLA4 antibody significantly slowed tumor growth and improved the strength of tumor-attacking T cells.

“Our analysis revealed that combination therapy significantly extended the lifespan of tumor-bearing mice compared to mice with only one type of therapy or no therapy at all,” said co-lead researcher Guangfu Li, PhD, DVM , Associate Professor in the Department of Surgery and Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology.

Li said the finding is especially promising given the current lack of effective therapies for liver cancer, which is the third leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. For patients diagnosed with liver cancer, the average five-year survival rate of all stages is 20%, according to the American Cancer Society.

“What is particularly remarkable is that we have now demonstrated that LipC6 treatment significantly improves the ability of anti-CTLA-4 antibodies to suppress liver cancer,” Li said. -CTLA-4 have been approved by the FDA for use in human patients, so this combination treatment can be quickly translated into clinical application.”

Further research will be needed to better understand the mechanisms underlying the success of this combination.

“The human therapeutic response to another commonly used type of immunotherapy, anti-PD-1, is only about 14% in patients with liver cancer,” said the co-investigator. principal Kevin F. Staveley-O’Carroll, MD, PhD, professor in the Department of Surgery. “We also tested anti-PD-1 immunotherapy in combination with LipC6, but it showed no benefit over the robust response demonstrated by the combination of LipC6 and anti-CTLA4 antibodies. This represents an approach new and powerful therapy.”

In addition to Li and Staveley-O’ Carroll, other MU co-authors include Xiaoqiang Qi, PhD, assistant research professor; Feng Wu, PhD, post-doc; Jussuf Kaifi, MD, assistant professor of surgery; Eric Kimchi, MD, chief of the division of surgical oncology and general surgery; and Sung Hoon Kim, visiting scholar from South Korea.

Their study, “C6-Ceramide nanoliposome in combination with anti-CTLA4 antibody enhances anti-tumor immunity in hepatocellular cancer,” was recently published by the journal Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. The research reported in this publication was supported by a grant from the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health. The content is the sole responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the funding bodies.

Highlighting the promise of personalized healthcare and the impact of large-scale interdisciplinary collaboration, the NextGen Precision Health initiative brings together innovators from the University of Missouri and three other research universities in the UM system in the pursuit of life-changing advances in precision health. It’s a collaborative effort to leverage Mizzou’s research strengths toward a better future for the health of Missourians and beyond. The Roy Blunt NextGen Precision Health building at MU anchors the overall initiative and expands collaboration between researchers, clinicians and industry partners in the cutting-edge research center.

Source of the story:

Materials provided by University of Missouri-Columbia. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

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Immunotherapeutic response in liver cancer can be predicted by new method https://rogalevich.org/immunotherapeutic-response-in-liver-cancer-can-be-predicted-by-new-method/ Wed, 18 May 2022 08:00:38 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/immunotherapeutic-response-in-liver-cancer-can-be-predicted-by-new-method/ Researchers are looking to improve immunotherapy for liver cancer or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Although immunotherapy has become the standard treatment method for HCC, its response rate has only been around 30% in patients with advanced disease. Now researchers at Osaka University report that they have developed an analytical method that could help predict whether a […]]]>

Researchers are looking to improve immunotherapy for liver cancer or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Although immunotherapy has become the standard treatment method for HCC, its response rate has only been around 30% in patients with advanced disease. Now researchers at Osaka University report that they have developed an analytical method that could help predict whether a patient with HCC would respond successfully to immunotherapy.

The results, “Multiomics identifies link between intratumoral steatosis and depleted tumor immune microenvironment in hepatocellular carcinoma», are published in the journal Hepatology.

“Immunotherapy has become the standard treatment for HCC, but its effectiveness remains limited,” the researchers wrote. “To identify immunotherapy-responsive HCC, we profiled the molecular abnormalities and tumor immune microenvironment (TIME) of rapidly increasing nonviral HCC.”

TIME is the area inside the tumor in which various immune cells and other cell types interact and send/receive messages and signals.

“We looked at 113 patients who developed HCC without hepatitis virus infection,” said Hiroki Murai, the study’s lead author. “We used a multi-omics approach, which means we looked at the DNA sequences of specific genes frequently mutated in HCC, but also performed a more general assessment of RNA sequences to study expression levels. of all the genes in these tumors.”

The researchers categorized the 113 HCC cases based on their TIME composition estimated by gene expression profiling. They found a single TIME in 23% of HCC cases that had a significant amount of intratumoral fat accumulation, known as steatotic HCC.

“Steatotic HCC tumors tended to have an immuno-enriched, but immuno-depleted TIME,” explained lead author Tetsuo Takehara. “There was a strong infiltration of immune cells, including M2 macrophages and cancer-associated fibroblasts, but nearby T cells were depleted. They have lost much of their combat capability.

The group also determined that increased fat levels in these tumor cells induce the expression of PD-L1, an immune checkpoint molecule that leads to immunosuppressive TIME.

“An in vitro study showed that palmitic acid-induced lipid accumulation in HCC cells upregulated PD-L1 expression and promoted immunosuppressive phenotypes of co-cultured macrophages and fibroblasts,” wrote noted the researchers. “Patients with steatotic HCC, confirmed by chemical shift MRI, had significantly longer PFS with combination immunotherapy using anti-PD-L1 and anti-VEGF antibodies.”

“PD-L1 is a common target for immunotherapy drugs because interfering with this protein can help restore immune cell functions,” says Takahiro Kodama, co-lead author of the study. “Our results suggest that HCC tumors with steatosis would therefore be sensitive to these types of drugs.”

The results demonstrate that intratumoral steatosis could be used as a new biomarker to assess the efficacy of immunotherapy in HCC cases.

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Experts Worried About Rising Liver Cancer Mortality – The New Indian Express https://rogalevich.org/experts-worried-about-rising-liver-cancer-mortality-the-new-indian-express/ Mon, 16 May 2022 02:32:00 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/experts-worried-about-rising-liver-cancer-mortality-the-new-indian-express/ By Express press service CUTTACK: Even though liver cancer or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is becoming a serious public health problem in the country, detecting the cancer at an advanced stage makes treatment difficult and many lives are lost in the process. Health experts, who gathered at a two-day conference on “Guidelines for the Management of […]]]>

By Express press service

CUTTACK: Even though liver cancer or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is becoming a serious public health problem in the country, detecting the cancer at an advanced stage makes treatment difficult and many lives are lost in the process.

Health experts, who gathered at a two-day conference on “Guidelines for the Management of HCC in India”, organized by the Indian National Association for the Study of the Liver (INASL) in Puri , have expressed their concern over the increase in liver cancer mortality in the country.

“Over 80% of liver cancer patients typically present for treatment at intermediate and advanced stages. If cancer is detected at an early stage, there are ways to manage it effectively. With majority reports in advanced stages, it is important to formulate strategies for their management, and thus save lives,” said Prof SP Singh, HCC Task Force Leader.

Attending the conference, Prof. Dr. Vinod K Paul, a member of NITI Aayog, expressed concern over the rising mortality rate due to chronic liver diseases. “Sufficient health infrastructure has been created by the central government. Despite this, around 2.72 million people die every year in India from cirrhosis of the liver,” Paul said, calling on experts to find ways to reduce deaths and advise the government on what needs to be done. made to improve the condition of patients with liver cancer. in the intermediate and advanced stages.

Many new drugs and therapeutic interventions have emerged to treat liver cancer. It should be a combined effort of physicians (hepatologist), radiation oncologist, liver surgeon, transplant surgeon, medical oncologist and nuclear medicine, said Professor Singh, and added that the aim of the meeting was to formulate standardized guidelines for the treatment and management of HCC. .

No less than 35 experts from across the country participated in the meeting chaired by the Chairman of the HCC Task Force, Dr. Subrat Kumar Acharya. A member of the task force, Dr. Manoj Kumar Sahu of Apollo Hospital coordinated the conference.

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Global Liver Cancer Diagnostics Market Forecast, 2021-2022 & 2028: Growing Emergence of New Technologies and Growing Demand for Point-of-Care Testing https://rogalevich.org/global-liver-cancer-diagnostics-market-forecast-2021-2022-2028-growing-emergence-of-new-technologies-and-growing-demand-for-point-of-care-testing/ Fri, 13 May 2022 12:30:00 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/global-liver-cancer-diagnostics-market-forecast-2021-2022-2028-growing-emergence-of-new-technologies-and-growing-demand-for-point-of-care-testing/ DUBLIN, May 13, 2022–(BUSINESS WIRE)–The “Liver Cancer Diagnostics Market Forecast to 2028 – Impact of COVID-19 and Global Analysis by Type and End User” report has been added to from ResearchAndMarkets.com offer. The liver cancer diagnostics market size is expected to reach US$15,951.77 million by 2028, from US$9,323.14 million in 2021; it is estimated to […]]]>

DUBLIN, May 13, 2022–(BUSINESS WIRE)–The “Liver Cancer Diagnostics Market Forecast to 2028 – Impact of COVID-19 and Global Analysis by Type and End User” report has been added to from ResearchAndMarkets.com offer.

The liver cancer diagnostics market size is expected to reach US$15,951.77 million by 2028, from US$9,323.14 million in 2021; it is estimated to grow at a CAGR of 8.0% over the period 2021-2028.

Laboratory Testing Segment to Lead the Liver Cancer Diagnostics Market During 2021-2028

The report highlights the key factors driving the market and prominent players with their developments. The growth of the liver cancer diagnostics market is mainly attributed to the increasing prevalence of liver cancer and increasing R&D investments in the development of new diagnostic tests. On the other hand, the high cost of technologically advanced liver cancer diagnostic solutions is hampering the market growth.

Hepatocellular carcinoma is the most common type of liver; it starts in the main type of liver cell (hepatocyte) and is the most common type of primary liver cancer. Hepatocellular carcinoma most often occurs in people with chronic liver disease, such as cirrhosis caused by hepatitis B or hepatitis C.

Also, other types of liver cancer are significantly less common, such as intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and hepatoblastoma. Cancer that starts in another area of ​​the body, such as the colon, lungs, or breast, and then spreads to the liver is called metastatic cancer. Also, metastatic colon cancer is a type of cancer that starts in the colon and spreads to the liver.

For example, according to the CDC (Centers of Disease Control and Prevention), each year in the United States, approximately 24,500 men and 10,000 women contract liver cancer, and approximately 18,600 men and 9,000 women die from the disease. The percentage of Americans who have liver cancer has been increasing for several decades. Liver cancer is more common in other parts of the world than in the United States.

Moreover, according to an article published in CCO (Chinese Clinical Oncology), hepatocellular cancer (HCC) is one of the leading causes of cancer death worldwide. In Europe, HCC is responsible for approximately 47,000 deaths per year. The incidence is relatively low except in southern Europe, where the age-standardized incidence rate in men is 9.8 per 100,000 compared with 3.8 in northern Europe, 4.6 in central Europe and Eastern and 7.2 in Western Europe.

However, in the UK, HCC death rates are expected to increase by 14% between 2006 and 2025, representing the largest increase of any male cancer. Additionally, being overweight or obese is a risk factor for liver cancer and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is a common condition in obese people. People with a subtype of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, known as nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), can develop cirrhosis, which can cause liver cancer.

According to a research article by Eunsun Kim et al., published in Experimental & Molecular Medicine Journal 2020, the incidence rate associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is increasing, and the Global Burden Mortality from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is expected to reach 1 million deaths per year by 2030.

In addition, some inherited metabolic diseases can lead to cirrhosis. Lifestyle and behaviors such as smoking cigarettes and drinking alcohol are the leading cause of cirrhosis in the United States, which is linked to an increased risk of liver cancer. Additionally, type 2 diabetes has been associated with an increased risk of liver cancer, usually in patients with other risk factors such as heavy alcohol consumption or chronic viral hepatitis.

This risk may also be increased because people with type 2 diabetes tend to be overweight or obese, which, in turn, can cause liver problems. According to the tenth edition 2021 of the IDF Diabetes Atlas, approximately 537 million adults (20-79 years old) are living with diabetes. The total number of people with diabetes is expected to reach 643 million by 2030 and 783 million by 2045. The factors mentioned above increase the risks of liver cancer, thereby boosting the liver cancer diagnostics market.

The global liver cancer diagnostics market, based on type, is segmented into laboratory tests, endoscopy, imaging, biopsy and others. The laboratory test segment market is further segmented into blood tests and biomarkers. The laboratory testing segment held the largest market share in 2021.

However, the imaging segment is expected to register a CAGR of 8.5% in the market during the forecast period. On the basis of end-user, the global liver cancer diagnostics market is segmented into hospitals and diagnostic laboratories, academic and research institutes, and CRO laboratories. The hospital and diagnostic laboratory segment held the largest market share in 2021, as hospitals provide healthcare facilities with specialized scientific equipment.

A team of qualified personnel is in charge of treating, investigating and solving problems associated with modern medical science in the hospital. Various medical research teams are constantly working on the introduction of innovative technologies related to diagnostic methods and other activities in the medical field.

Patients generally prefer the hospital to undergo treatment for liver cancer due to the availability of advanced treatment options. Hospitals are the place of care for patients. Moreover, the same segment is expected to register a CAGR of 8.5% in the market during the forecast period.

Key market dynamics

Market factors

Market constraints

Market opportunities

Future trends

Company Profiles

For more information on this report, visit https://www.researchandmarkets.com/r/am7c0r

See the source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220513005275/en/

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Disparities in advanced liver cancer risk and mortality by race and ethnicity https://rogalevich.org/disparities-in-advanced-liver-cancer-risk-and-mortality-by-race-and-ethnicity/ Fri, 13 May 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/disparities-in-advanced-liver-cancer-risk-and-mortality-by-race-and-ethnicity/ This article was originally published here J Natl Cancer Inst. May 12, 2022: djac097. doi: 10.1093/jnci/djac097. Online ahead of print. ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: In the United States, liver cancer is the 5th and 7th most common cause of cancer-related death in men and women, respectively. Compared to other racial/ethnic groups in the United States, Asian and […]]]>

This article was originally published here

J Natl Cancer Inst. May 12, 2022: djac097. doi: 10.1093/jnci/djac097. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the United States, liver cancer is the 5th and 7th most common cause of cancer-related death in men and women, respectively. Compared to other racial/ethnic groups in the United States, Asian and Pacific Islander populations experience the highest incidence rates of liver cancer, but little is known about disparities in disease risk between advanced stage or risk of liver cancer mortality in these heterogeneous populations. All statistical tests were two-sided.

METHODS: In a population-based cohort of 60,146 patients aged 20-79 years diagnosed with liver cancer between 2004 and 2018, identified through the Surveillance, Epidemiology and Endpoints Program, we examined associations between race/ethnicity, including specific Asian and Pacific Islander people. subgroups, and the risk of advanced liver cancer and liver cancer-specific mortality.

RESULTS: Compared with non-Hispanic white patients, non-Hispanic black, Filipino, and Laotian patients had a 30% to 85% elevated chance of being diagnosed with stage IV liver cancer, while Hispanic, Vietnamese, and Chinese patients had 7-33% lower odds of being diagnosed with stage IV liver cancer (all p values ​​<0.05). In addition, black, Kampuchean, and non-Hispanic Laotian patients had an elevated liver cancer-specific mortality risk of 6–22%, and Hispanic, Vietnamese, Chinese, and Korean patients had a lower liver cancer-specific mortality risk. 3-27% (all p-values ​​<0.05).

CONCLUSIONS: Substantial variations in the risk of advanced liver cancer and the risk of liver cancer mortality were observed by race and ethnicity, including considerable heterogeneity between individuals broadly defined as Asians and Pacific Islanders. Further efforts to understand the contributors to these disparities are needed to inform potential targeted screening and treatment interventions.

PMID:35552746 | DO I:10.1093/jnci/djac097

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Hydrogels for localized liver cancer chemotherapy: a possible strategy for improved and safe treatment of liver cancer https://rogalevich.org/hydrogels-for-localized-liver-cancer-chemotherapy-a-possible-strategy-for-improved-and-safe-treatment-of-liver-cancer-2/ Wed, 11 May 2022 15:02:42 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/hydrogels-for-localized-liver-cancer-chemotherapy-a-possible-strategy-for-improved-and-safe-treatment-of-liver-cancer-2/ This article was originally published here Deliver. 2022 Dec;29(1):1457-1476. doi: 10.1080/10717544.2022.2070299. ABSTRACT Systemic medicine has always been preferred for the treatment of the majority of pathological conditions, especially liver cancer. Indeed, this mode of treatment is associated with adverse effects, toxicity, off-target accumulation and rapid hepatic and renal clearance. Many efforts have been made to […]]]>

This article was originally published here

Deliver. 2022 Dec;29(1):1457-1476. doi: 10.1080/10717544.2022.2070299.

ABSTRACT

Systemic medicine has always been preferred for the treatment of the majority of pathological conditions, especially liver cancer. Indeed, this mode of treatment is associated with adverse effects, toxicity, off-target accumulation and rapid hepatic and renal clearance. Many efforts have been made to design systemic therapeutic carriers to improve retention while decreasing side effects and clearance. After systemic medication, local administration of therapeutic agents allows higher “effective” doses with fewer side effects, renal accumulation and clearance. Hydrogels are highly biocompatible and can be used for both imaging and therapy. The hydrogel-based drug delivery approach has fewer side effects than traditional chemotherapy and can deliver drugs to tumors for longer. The chemical and physical flexibility of hydrogels can be used to achieve disease-induced results. on the spot accumulation as well as subsequent drug release and programmed degradation by the hydrogel. Additionally, they may act as a biocompatible depot for localized chemotherapy when stimuli-responsive carriers are administered. Here, we summarize the design strategies of various hydrogels used for localized liver cancer chemotherapy and their routes of administration, as well as recent research on smart hydrogels.

PMID:35532174 | CPM:PMC9090357 | DO I:10.1080/10717544.2022.2070299

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Hydrogels for localized liver cancer chemotherapy: a possible strategy for improved and safe treatment of liver cancer https://rogalevich.org/hydrogels-for-localized-liver-cancer-chemotherapy-a-possible-strategy-for-improved-and-safe-treatment-of-liver-cancer/ Mon, 09 May 2022 15:02:20 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/hydrogels-for-localized-liver-cancer-chemotherapy-a-possible-strategy-for-improved-and-safe-treatment-of-liver-cancer/ This article was originally published here Deliver. 2022 Dec;29(1):1457-1476. doi: 10.1080/10717544.2022.2070299. ABSTRACT Systemic medicine has always been preferred for the treatment of the majority of pathological conditions, especially liver cancer. Indeed, this mode of treatment is associated with adverse effects, toxicity, off-target accumulation and rapid hepatic and renal clearance. Many efforts have been made to […]]]>

This article was originally published here

Deliver. 2022 Dec;29(1):1457-1476. doi: 10.1080/10717544.2022.2070299.

ABSTRACT

Systemic medicine has always been preferred for the treatment of the majority of pathological conditions, especially liver cancer. Indeed, this mode of treatment is associated with adverse effects, toxicity, off-target accumulation and rapid hepatic and renal clearance. Many efforts have been made to design systemic therapeutic carriers to improve retention while decreasing side effects and clearance. After systemic medication, local administration of therapeutic agents allows higher “effective” doses with fewer side effects, renal accumulation and clearance. Hydrogels are highly biocompatible and can be used for both imaging and therapy. The hydrogel-based drug delivery approach has fewer side effects than traditional chemotherapy and can deliver drugs to tumors for longer. The chemical and physical flexibility of hydrogels can be used to achieve disease-induced results. on the spot accumulation as well as subsequent drug release and programmed degradation by the hydrogel. Additionally, they may act as a biocompatible depot for localized chemotherapy when stimuli-responsive carriers are administered. Here, we summarize the design strategies of various hydrogels used for localized liver cancer chemotherapy and their routes of administration, as well as recent research on smart hydrogels.

PMID:35532174 | DO I:10.1080/10717544.2022.2070299

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