Liver cancer – Rogalevich http://rogalevich.org/ Sat, 27 Nov 2021 11:01:39 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://rogalevich.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.png Liver cancer – Rogalevich http://rogalevich.org/ 32 32 Patients with hepatitis B with metabolic risks have a higher risk of liver cancer https://rogalevich.org/patients-with-hepatitis-b-with-metabolic-risks-have-a-higher-risk-of-liver-cancer/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 06:35:13 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/patients-with-hepatitis-b-with-metabolic-risks-have-a-higher-risk-of-liver-cancer/ If hepatitis B patients have metabolic risk factors such as obesity and hypertension, they have a higher risk of developing liver cancer and death, a study has shown. The research team, led by Professor Lee June-young of the Department of Biostatistics at Korea University College of Medicine, published the study titled “Association of Metabolic Risk […]]]>

If hepatitis B patients have metabolic risk factors such as obesity and hypertension, they have a higher risk of developing liver cancer and death, a study has shown.

The research team, led by Professor Lee June-young of the Department of Biostatistics at Korea University College of Medicine, published the study titled “Association of Metabolic Risk Factors With Risks of Cancer and All-Cause Mortality in Patients With Chronic Hepatitis B ”in the June issue of Hepatology.

More than 200 million people suffer from chronic hepatitis B, and the disease is particularly common in Asia. It can lead to cirrhosis and liver cancer, causing social and economic burdens.

Patients with hepatitis B with more metabolic risk factors have a higher risk of developing liver cancer and death.

For patients with hepatitis B, oral antiviral agents are commonly used. Yet those who receive antiviral drugs have a high risk of developing liver cancer. Thus, the development of a treatment strategy to assess and manage risk factors for liver cancer is necessary.

The research team used data from around 300,000 patients with chronic hepatitis B who underwent health exams from 2007 to 2012 to assess metabolic risk factors such as obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes and high cholesterol. In addition, the research team analyzed the risks of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), non-HCC cancer, and overall mortality.

The research team assessed the risk of HCC and non-HCC cancer using the Fine-Gray sub-distribution risk model and the risk of death using the Cox proportional hazard regression model.

The results showed that the more metabolic risk factors there were, the higher the risk of HCC, non-HCC cancer, and mortality.

This trend has also been seen in patients who have been taking oral antiviral drugs for five years or more.

The study was a large-scale study of all patients with chronic hepatitis B in Korea.

He said it was important to assess and preventively manage metabolic risk factors as well as antiviral therapy to reduce patients’ cancer risk and increase their survival rate.

“In conducting this study, I felt it was necessary to ask a reasonable but creative research question to successfully conduct a big data-based health care cohort study,” said Lee, the lead researcher. “I hope the study results could lead to the development of clinical care so that many hepatitis B patients can have hope.”

The study was an international joint study, in which Fabien Zoulim, professor at the Lyon Cancer Research Center at the University of Lyon, France, participated.


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Doctors find genetic markers for liver cancer in blood and saliva https://rogalevich.org/doctors-find-genetic-markers-for-liver-cancer-in-blood-and-saliva/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 13:10:00 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/doctors-find-genetic-markers-for-liver-cancer-in-blood-and-saliva/ Doctors at RUDN University looked at markers of liver cancer and found that the disease can be recognized by fragments of RNA in saliva and blood. The results are published in Oncotarget. Newswise – Liver cancer is less common than other cancers, but it has lower survival rates. Sometimes it appears suddenly, but in most […]]]>

Doctors at RUDN University looked at markers of liver cancer and found that the disease can be recognized by fragments of RNA in saliva and blood. The results are published in Oncotarget.

Newswise – Liver cancer is less common than other cancers, but it has lower survival rates. Sometimes it appears suddenly, but in most cases it is preceded by other liver disease. For example, cirrhosis of the liver due to hepatitis C. However, in this case, the development of liver cancer may occur imperceptibly. It is difficult to diagnose it at an early stage. That’s why it’s important to develop ways to detect liver cancer in people at risk before it’s too late.

“Despite the relatively rare malignancy of cirrhosis of the liver, including those associated with the hepatitis C virus, and the coming era of direct antiviral drugs, there is a group of patients with cirrhosis who are at risk of developing cancer. of the liver. Of course, in these cases the cancer is not an unexpected disease, but it can be clinically invisible for a long time. Thus, methods of detecting molecular changes in the early stages are important, “said Alisa Petkevich, Researcher in the Department of Hospital Therapy with a course in Endocrinology, Hematology and Clinical Laboratory Diagnostics from RUDN University.

Doctors at RUDN University have discovered that microRNAs (small sequences of RNA that do not code for genes but are involved in regulating their expression) can be a marker for liver cancer. Doctors took blood and saliva samples from 29 cirrhosis patients, 24 liver cancer patients, and 21 healthy volunteers and compared the level of expression of 10 different microRNAs in the samples.

Seven microRNAs found in blood plasma outside of exosomes (the vesicles secreted by cells) were associated with liver cancer. Three of them were also found in the saliva. This can be important for diagnosis, as saliva analysis is much simpler as collecting the sample does not need a professional, patients can do it themselves. MicroRNAs found inside exosomes may become an even more effective marker for liver cancer. For them, saliva is even preferable for blood analysis. Therefore, depending on the available biological material, it is possible to estimate the development of liver cancer by exosomal and non-exosomal microRNAs.

“The incidence rate, along with other factors, including the reluctance of at-risk patients to routinely visit the research center for blood draws, complicates the collection of samples to identify markers for early diagnosis. One possible solution could be the use of biomaterial. which does not require medical personnel for its collection, such as saliva. We have proven that saliva is a promising source of exosomal and non-exosomal microRNAs. Exosomal microRNAs have shown a strong association with primary liver cancer in saliva samples, ”said Alisa Petkevich, a researcher in the department of hospital therapy with a course in endocrinology, hematology and clinical laboratory diagnostics from the ‘RUDN University.


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New score developed to predict outcome in liver cancer patients receiving immunotherapy https://rogalevich.org/new-score-developed-to-predict-outcome-in-liver-cancer-patients-receiving-immunotherapy/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 23:43:00 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/new-score-developed-to-predict-outcome-in-liver-cancer-patients-receiving-immunotherapy/ There are still no established biomarkers to predict the success of immunotherapy in patients with liver cancer. In a multicenter study led by Matthias Pinter of the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at the Medical University of Vienna, a score based on simple laboratory parameters has now been developed to predict outcome in patients with […]]]>

There are still no established biomarkers to predict the success of immunotherapy in patients with liver cancer. In a multicenter study led by Matthias Pinter of the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at the Medical University of Vienna, a score based on simple laboratory parameters has now been developed to predict outcome in patients with d ‘liver cancer receiving immunotherapy. The results were published in the prestigious Journal of Hepatology.

With the aim of providing personalized medicine (also known as precision medicine), the Liver Cancer Study Group (HCC) Vienna, led by Matthias Pinter at the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology of the Department of Medicine III of MedUni Vienna and Vienna General Hospital, is primarily concerned with identifying groups of patients who might respond particularly well to certain forms of treatment.

The recent large-scale international retrospective study developed a score based on the two routine laboratory parameters, alpha-fetoprotein (AFP; tumor marker) and C-reactive protein (CRP; inflammatory marker) correlated with the results. in patients with liver cancer treated with immunotherapy.

If both parameters were raised above a certain level, patients had significantly shorter survival and a lower likelihood of achieving radiological control of the disease with immunotherapy. Both parameters, AFP and CRP, can influence the tumor immune environment to promote tumor growth and potentially make immunotherapy less effective. “

Bernhard Scheiner, first author

The results were validated in an independent cohort. A total of 14 European centers participated in this study. “Because the score is based on simple laboratory parameters, it is objective and widely available. In the future, the score could help in the selection of patients for clinical trials and support decision making in clinical practice, ”says Matthias Pinter.

Immunotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary cancer of the liver and is found mainly in people with chronic liver disease. In most cases, HCC is not diagnosed until it has reached an advanced stage, where surgical or loco-ablative procedures are no longer possible, and systemic drug therapies are mainly used. Recently, the first immunotherapy-based regimen was established for HCC, representing the new standard of care in drug therapy for the vast majority of patients with advanced HCC. It is not yet clear which patients with HCC benefit the most from immunotherapy.

Source:

Vienna Medical University

Journal reference:

Scheiner, B., et al. (2021) Prognosis of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma treated with immunotherapy – development and validation of the CRAFITY score. Journal of Hepatology. doi.org/10.1016/j.jhep.2021.09.035.


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Eureka launches ARTEMIS T cell therapy trial for pediatric liver cancer https://rogalevich.org/eureka-launches-artemis-t-cell-therapy-trial-for-pediatric-liver-cancer/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 10:56:53 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/eureka-launches-artemis-t-cell-therapy-trial-for-pediatric-liver-cancer/ Eureka Therapeutics has initiated the Phase I / II ARYA-2 clinical trial of ET140203 ARTEMIS T cell therapy for the treatment of liver cancer in pediatric patients. Therapy will be investigated to treat unspecified hepatocellular neoplasm (HCN-NOS), or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), relapsed or refractory hepatocellular neoplasm (HB) in pediatric patients. The multicenter, open label, dose […]]]>

Eureka Therapeutics has initiated the Phase I / II ARYA-2 clinical trial of ET140203 ARTEMIS T cell therapy for the treatment of liver cancer in pediatric patients.

Therapy will be investigated to treat unspecified hepatocellular neoplasm (HCN-NOS), or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), relapsed or refractory hepatocellular neoplasm (HB) in pediatric patients.

The multicenter, open label, dose escalation clinical study will evaluate the preliminary efficacy and safety / tolerability of ET140203 T cells in pediatric patients positive for alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) / human leukocyte antigen (HLA) – A2-positive who have relapsed / refractory HB, HCN-NOS or HCC.

It is part of the Eureka Liver Cancer Program portfolio.

During ET140203 therapy, T cells from a patient’s body are collected and engineered to release the ARTEMIS cell receptor from Eureka and infused into the patient.

The modified T cells release a TCR-mimicking antibody that targets an AFP-peptide / HLA-A2 complex on liver cancer cells.

The company said the Phase I segment of the trial is now recruiting participants from the Dana-Farber / Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center in the United States.

Eureka Therapeutics Chairman and CEO Dr Cheng Liu said, “Eureka recognizes the highly unmet medical need in the treatment of pediatric patients with advanced liver cancers.

“We are delighted to be working with Dana-Farber to address this by providing ARTEMIS T cell therapies to clinic patients. ”

The ARYA-2 trial is being conducted in conjunction with the Company’s ongoing studies ARYA-1 and ARYA-3, which are evaluating ARTEMIS T cell therapy to treat HCC in adult patients.

In the ARYA-1 study, the safety of ET140203 ARTEMIS T cell therapy was evaluated in adult subjects with AFP-positive / HLA-A-2-positive advanced HCC found in liver cancer cells.

ARYA-3 is evaluating ECT204 T cell therapy in adult subjects with Glypican 3 (GPC3) positive HCC.

ET140203 has received Fast Track designation from the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat HB and HCC in pediatric patients.

It has also received the Rare Pediatric Disease designation to treat HB.


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Whole Grain Consumption Linked to Lower Risk of Liver Cancer, Harvard Researchers Find | New https://rogalevich.org/whole-grain-consumption-linked-to-lower-risk-of-liver-cancer-harvard-researchers-find-new/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/whole-grain-consumption-linked-to-lower-risk-of-liver-cancer-harvard-researchers-find-new/ Researchers at the Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health have found an association between high consumption of whole grains and fiber and a lower risk of liver cancer and death from chronic liver disease, according to a study published in Nature Communications November 4. The researchers used a sample of nearly 500,000 participants surveyed […]]]>

Researchers at the Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health have found an association between high consumption of whole grains and fiber and a lower risk of liver cancer and death from chronic liver disease, according to a study published in Nature Communications November 4.

The researchers used a sample of nearly 500,000 participants surveyed by the National Institutes of Health between 1995 and 1996. After a median of 15.5 years, 940 participants had been diagnosed with primary liver cancer and 993 had died of primary liver cancer. chronic liver disease. sickness.

The researchers observed a 22% decrease in liver cancer risk and a 56% decrease in chronic liver disease mortality in participants who consumed whole grains in the highest quintile. Likewise, they observed a 31% decrease in liver cancer risk and a 63% decrease in chronic liver disease mortality in participants who had fiber intake in the highest quintile.

Xuehong “Hong” Zhang – a cancer epidemiologist and assistant professor of nutrition at the School of Public Health who worked on the study – said it was a “prospective cohort study based on the study. NIH-AARP ”.

“We are using the validated Food Frequency Questionnaire to measure whole grain and fiber consumption,” Zhang said. “We took into account the main known risk factors for liver cancer in the analysis, which suggests that the results we are seeing here for whole grains and fiber are likely independent of these known risk factors.”

Jessica Petrick – another study author and epidemiologist at Boston University’s Slone Epidemiology Center – said the study “supports current dietary recommendations for cancer prevention.”

Although scientists do not yet understand all of the biological mechanisms underlying the association between diet and liver disease, the study is a step towards understanding “a little more of the dietary etiology of the disease. liver cancer, which is quite poorly recorded, ”said Petrick.

“The incidence of liver cancer in the United States is quite rare compared to more common types of cancer,” she said.

The study also has implications for future research on diet and liver disease, such as its intersections with race and ethnicity.

According to Zhang, most of the participants in this study were non-Hispanic whites.

“It is desirable to study the relationship between diet and liver cancer or mortality from liver disease in more diverse racial or ethnic populations, especially since liver cancer disproportionately affects minority populations. “, did he declare. “To my knowledge, studies in this area are relatively limited. More surveys of these populations are needed in the future. “

Despite the results, Petrick said the public should be careful about adjusting diets.

“I would make sure to recommend that they talk to their doctor or dietitian before making any changes to their diet on their own. Because this is epidemiological literature, it is very broad, ”said Petrick. “Each person has their own individualized risk profile, and this should really be taken into account any time they make a change in their diet.”


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Risk of liver cancer persists even after HCV eradication https://rogalevich.org/risk-of-liver-cancer-persists-even-after-hcv-eradication/ Wed, 17 Nov 2021 12:55:52 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/risk-of-liver-cancer-persists-even-after-hcv-eradication/ Although the risk of liver cancer decreases in patients infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) for whom the virus is cleared with direct-acting antiviral drugs (DAAs), these patients have not come out of the woods, and those without a sustained viral infection (SVR) have a significantly higher risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), according […]]]>

Although the risk of liver cancer decreases in patients infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) for whom the virus is cleared with direct-acting antiviral drugs (DAAs), these patients have not come out of the woods, and those without a sustained viral infection (SVR) have a significantly higher risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), according to the results of a large study.

Among patients with cirrhosis of the liver due to HCV infections treated at 30 centers in Italy, a large percentage had SVR after treatment with DAA drugs. Only a small percentage of this group subsequently developed HCC.

In contrast, not having an SVR was associated with a more than seven times higher risk of liver cancer, said Loreta A. Kondili, MD, PhD, of the Center for Global Health at Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome. , in Italy, during a conference presenting the results at The Liver Meeting 2021: American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD), held online.

“Failure to achieve SVR after treatment with AAD is strongly associated with the likelihood of developing HCC. Older age, [HCV] genotype 3 and low platelet and albumin levels are independent factors in the development of HCC despite viral eradication, ”she said.

Cohort study

The results of the study come from the PITER cohort study, a prospective, multicenter observational study of a representative sample of patients with HCV.

Kondili and colleagues evaluated the medium and long-term effects of DAA treatment on HCC levels in patients with HCV-induced cirrhosis of the liver. Patients who had undergone a liver transplant or who had previously been diagnosed with HCC were excluded.

The investigators identified a total of 2214 patients treated with DAA, of which 149 (6.7%) developed de novo HCC after a median follow-up of 30 months.

In the total group, 2064 (93%) patients had SVR, of which 119 (5.8%) developed HCC. Of those patients who developed HCC, 80% were diagnosed with stage B or C disease according to the Barcelona Clinic’s liver cancer staging system.

For the remaining 150 patients who did not have SVR, 30 (20%) developed de novo HCC, a difference that resulted in an adjusted risk ratio (HRa) for HCC of 7.38 (P <.01).

The time between the end of DAA treatment and the diagnosis of HCC was shorter for patients who did not have SVR. For these patients, the 2-year CHC-free survival rate was 81%, compared to 98% for patients who had SVR (P <.001).

As reported by Kondili, among patients who achieved SVR, variables significantly associated with the risk of HCC included advanced age (aHR, 1.06), a platelet count above the baseline of 150,000 L (aHR , 2.43), albumin levels> 3.5 g / dL (aHR, 2.36) and diabetes (aHR, 1.53; all of these variables were significant by confidence intervals).

A total of 26% of these patients died during the follow-up period and 7.6% underwent a liver transplant.

Of the patients still alive at the end of the follow-up period, 38% had active HCC.

Long-term follow-up required

“It is useful to think of hepatitis C as a viral infection on the one hand [and] liver disease on the other, ”commented Raymond T. Chung, MD, director of the Hepatology and Liver Center and vice chief of gastroenterology at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.

“In terms of elimination, we can eradicate the virus from most patients with almost 100% success with antivirals. the rest of their life without hepatitis C, ”he said.

Chung, who was not involved in the study, pointed out that despite clearing the virus, patients may still have severe liver fibrosis or cirrhosis. It is imperative that these patients are monitored for signs of cancer, he said.

“This is what is important in staging patients and in understanding the severity of their liver disease, because if there is advanced fibrosis, bridging fibrosis or cirrhosis, these are the patients who will require long-term cancer care. Their infectious disease is ruled out, but the liver disease persists, ”he said.

Chung also noted that the rates of liver cancer, decompensation and liver failure are higher in patients with untreated HCV than in patients whose HCV has been eradicated or suppressed with drug treatment. In addition, patients with untreated HCV are at greater risk of requiring a transplant than patients with treated HCV, and there is a residual cancer risk for patients who become HCV negative.

The study was funded by the Italian Ministry of Health. Kondili has financial relationships with Gilead Science and AbbVie. Chung did not report any relevant financial relationship.

The Liver Meeting 2021: American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD): Abstract 99. Presented November 14, 2021.

Award-winning medical journalist Neil Osterweil is a long-time and frequent contributor to Medscape.

For more news, follow Medscape on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube.



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Iron load in NAFLD is linked to a higher risk of liver cancer https://rogalevich.org/iron-load-in-nafld-is-linked-to-a-higher-risk-of-liver-cancer/ Sun, 14 Nov 2021 14:01:26 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/iron-load-in-nafld-is-linked-to-a-higher-risk-of-liver-cancer/ Patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) had a significantly higher risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) due to high levels of serum iron biomarkers or transferrin saturation, one researcher reported. In an analysis of over 18,000 NAFLD patients, elevated serum iron levels greater than 175 μg / dL were associated with a more than […]]]>

Patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) had a significantly higher risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) due to high levels of serum iron biomarkers or transferrin saturation, one researcher reported.

In an analysis of over 18,000 NAFLD patients, elevated serum iron levels greater than 175 μg / dL were associated with a more than twice the risk of developing HCC (HR 2.44, 95% CI 1 , 06-5.62), while lower iron levels (less than 75 g / dL) were associated with a 33% reduction in the risk of HCC (HR 0.67, 95% CI 0.48 -0.93, P<0.001) compared to patients with normal serum iron levels (range 75 to 175 μg / dL), reported Yi-Chuan Yu, MD, of the Hillman Cancer Center at the University of Pittsburgh.

Transferrin saturation levels greater than 35% were also associated with a two-fold increased risk for these patients of developing HCC (HR 2.18, 95% CI 1.27-3.74) compared to those having normal transferrin saturation levels (range 25% to 35%). he said during a presentation at the American Association for the Study of Liver Disease (AASLD) virtual meeting.

During the 4.35 years of follow-up, 192 patients with NAFLD developed HCC, and the majority were white males, older, smokers or previous smokers, and had hypertension, hyperlipidemia or diabetes mellitus. type 2 (T2DM) compared to patients with NAFLD who did not develop HCC (P<0.001 for all), according to the researchers.

Douglas T. Dieterich, MD, of Icahn’s Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City, called the results interesting, stating that “we know iron is a pro-inflammatory compound, so that part makes sense. . The real question to ask is: Are these high iron patients heterozygous for hemochromatosis? “

No significant association with the risk of HCC was observed for other iron biomarkers, serum ferritin or total iron binding capacity.

“The fact that ferritin is not associated would argue against this hemochromatosis, another good marker to look for as a prognostic predictor of NASH [nonalcoholic steatohepatitis]”, added Dieterich, who was not involved in this study.

“Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease has become a major contributor to the increased incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma here in the United States,” said Yu. “Iron, an essential metal, is mainly stored in hepatocytes and this metal played a role in the development of HCC-related NAFLD, “describing the limited epidemiological data available for NAFLD patients without hemochromatosis or other major underlying causes of chronic liver disease.

The iron overload was caused by hereditary hemochromatosis, a metabolic risk factor associated with the development of HCC, the researchers noted. Excessive iron deposits have also been associated with microvascular complications of poorly controlled T2DM.

Yu and his colleagues evaluated electronic health record data on 47,970 patients (aged 40 to 89) with NAFLD who did not have hemochromatosis. They were enrolled in a large healthcare system from January 2004 to December 2018. For the current analysis, 18,569 patients were included after being tested for at least one of the four biomarkers of iron – serum ferritin, serum iron. , transferrin saturation or total iron binding. capacity. The NAFLD cohort had compensated cirrhosis, decompensated cirrhosis, and NASH.

The primary outcome measure evaluated the association of serum iron biomarkers with the incidence of HCC in patients with NAFLD. Proportional regression analysis for calculating the incidence of HCC associated with an elevation of an iron biomarker adjusted for demographics, BMI, smoking, and T2DM.

The patients were predominantly Caucasian (93%) and female (51%) with a mean age of 66 years and a mean BMI of 32.5.

“We conclude that this clinical monitoring of serum iron levels, particularly serum iron in transferrin saturation tests, may be a potential strategy to identify patients with NAFLD who are at higher risk for hepatocellular carcinoma,” Yu said.

Limitations of the study included a lack of diversity among participants, limiting the generalizability of the results.

“More research is needed to investigate the association of iron indices on the risk of developing HCC in NAFLD,” the researchers wrote.

  • Zaina Hamza is a writer for MedPage Today, covering gastroenterology and infectious diseases. She is based in Chicago.

Disclosures

The study was funded by the NIH and the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Hillman Cancer Center.

Yu and his co-authors have disclosed no connection with the industry.


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Targeting stem cell signaling could halt liver cancer progression Elucidating a new therapeutic target https://rogalevich.org/targeting-stem-cell-signaling-could-halt-liver-cancer-progression-elucidating-a-new-therapeutic-target/ https://rogalevich.org/targeting-stem-cell-signaling-could-halt-liver-cancer-progression-elucidating-a-new-therapeutic-target/#respond Wed, 10 Nov 2021 01:02:00 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/targeting-stem-cell-signaling-could-halt-liver-cancer-progression-elucidating-a-new-therapeutic-target/ Kanazawa, Japan – Stem cells from liver cancer, believed to be responsible for the malignant traits of HCC, are considered the target to be eradicated. Today, Japanese researchers have discovered a signaling pathway in HCC that promotes the properties of liver cancer stem cells. In a study published last month in Molecular Oncology, researchers at […]]]>

Kanazawa, Japan – Stem cells from liver cancer, believed to be responsible for the malignant traits of HCC, are considered the target to be eradicated. Today, Japanese researchers have discovered a signaling pathway in HCC that promotes the properties of liver cancer stem cells.

In a study published last month in Molecular Oncology, researchers at the University of Kanazawa found that signaling of bone morphological protein 9 (BMP9) promotes the properties of liver cancer stem cells by enhancing the expression of l DNA binding protein 1 (ID1) inhibitor.

BMP9 is a known player in liver disease because it prevents the death of liver cancer cells, encourages their proliferation and promotes tumor formation in the liver. The Kanazawa University team set out to determine whether BMP9 specifically plays an important role in activating liver cancer stem cells, a minority subset of cancer cells that can lead to tumor initiation, promote tumor progression and induce drug resistance.

“Cancer stem cells are thought to be responsible for the malignant characteristics of cancer such as tumor progression, recurrence, metastasis and drug resistance,” says lead study author Han Chen. “Because BMP9 has recently been associated with the progression of liver cancer, we wanted to study the interaction between BMP9 and cancer stem cells in HCC. “

To do this, the researchers examined the expression of BMP9 in tumor tissue samples from patients with HCC and analyzed the correlation with patient prognosis and expression of the liver cancer strain marker EpCAM.

“The results were very interesting,” says Kouki Nio, corresponding author. “We found that high BMP9 HCC cases had lower overall survival. In addition, expression of BMP9 correlated with expression of EpCAM in HCC tissues. These suggest that BMP9 is linked to the malignant potential of HCC.

In fact, BMP9 promoted the expression of EpCAM by regulating the expression of ID1 in HCC cells. Blockade of BMP9-ID1 signaling by BMP receptor inhibitors successfully suppressed HCC tumor growth and EpCAM expression in mice.

“Our results suggest that BMP9-ID1 signaling is crucial for the activation of liver cancer stem cells. As such, targeting this signaling could be a promising therapy for patients with advanced HCC in the future, ”says Chen.

In terms of future application for patients with HCC, certain clinical studies using BMP receptor inhibitor monotherapy or in combination with other agents are desired.

[Funder]

This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Numbers JP18K15807 and JP20K17044.

[Article]

Title: MP9-ID1 Signaling Promotes Properties of EpCAM-Positive Cancer Stem Cells in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

Journal: Molecular oncology

Authors: Han Chen, Kouki Nio, Taro Yamashita, Hikari Okada, Ru Li, Tsuyoshi Suda, Yingyi Li, Phuong Thi Bich Doan, Akihiro Seki, Hidetoshi Nakagawa, Tadashi Toyama, Takeshi Terashima, Noriho Iida, Tetsuro Shimakuchi, Kawagime Takator , Yoshio Sakai, Tatsuya Yamashita, Eishiro Mizukoshi, Masao Honda, Shuichi Kaneko

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/1878-0261.12963

/ Public distribution. This material from the original organization / authors may be ad hoc in nature, edited for clarity, style and length. The views and opinions expressed are those of the author (s). See it in full here.


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Manathakkali, Kerala’s Local Herb May Cure Liver Cancer, Research Gets U.S. FDA Approval https://rogalevich.org/manathakkali-keralas-local-herb-may-cure-liver-cancer-research-gets-u-s-fda-approval/ https://rogalevich.org/manathakkali-keralas-local-herb-may-cure-liver-cancer-research-gets-u-s-fda-approval/#respond Mon, 08 Nov 2021 05:01:51 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/manathakkali-keralas-local-herb-may-cure-liver-cancer-research-gets-u-s-fda-approval/ Manathakkali leaves can cure liver cancer, Manathakkali, known by its regional name, a local medicinal herb or plant from Kerala, is approved for its medicinal value against liver cancer by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Also known as turkey berry, black nightshade or Solanum nigrum, is a plant that grows profusely in […]]]>
Manathakkali leaves can cure liver cancer,

Manathakkali, known by its regional name, a local medicinal herb or plant from Kerala, is approved for its medicinal value against liver cancer by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Also known as turkey berry, black nightshade or Solanum nigrum, is a plant that grows profusely in the backyard and premises of the house as a weed.

The name Manathakkali is derived from the Tamil word, where, like in Kerala, it is known as Mulakuthakkali, Karinthakkali or chundakka.

Research by two scientists from the Rajiv Gandhi Center for Biotechnology (RGCB) revealed that the leaves of this plant have properties that can cure the human liver from uncontrolled growth of cells.

Research has found that utroside B, a compound separated from the leaves of the plant, has the ability to save the human liver from cancer cells. In reviewing the research document, the FDA considered the compound to be an orphan drug in order to develop new methods of treatment and to recognize new drugs.

Besides its qualities against diseases related to the liver, Manthakkali is rich in calcium, iron, riboflavin and vitamin C. It is preferable as a remedy for canker sores, constipation and urinary tract infections.

The compound in the leaves of the plant, which contains medicinal properties, has already received patent rights from the United States, Canada, Japan and South Korea. The seeds and leaves of Manthakkali are commonly used to make sauces and curries in Kerala. But, it is less used in Kerala, while the herb is widely cultivated and consumed in the neighboring state, Tamil Nadu.

It is found that 8 lakh people are killed every year due to liver cancer and 9 lakh new cases of the malignant disease are reported every year. Thus, this discovery paves the way for methods of healing the liver in modern times. The research paper was also published in a journal of the Nature group “Scientific Reports”.


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Kerala’s local herb ‘Manathakkali’ approved for liver cancer, research gets US FDA green light – The New Indian Express https://rogalevich.org/keralas-local-herb-manathakkali-approved-for-liver-cancer-research-gets-us-fda-green-light-the-new-indian-express/ https://rogalevich.org/keralas-local-herb-manathakkali-approved-for-liver-cancer-research-gets-us-fda-green-light-the-new-indian-express/#respond Thu, 04 Nov 2021 01:08:00 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/keralas-local-herb-manathakkali-approved-for-liver-cancer-research-gets-us-fda-green-light-the-new-indian-express/ Through Express news service THIRUVANANTHAPURAM: ‘Manathakkali’ (black nightshade or Solanum nigrum), a berry shrub found in the backyard, is traditionally known for its medicinal value. Today, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) noticed the potential of a compound isolated from the plant to treat liver cancer, thanks to the findings of a team […]]]>

Through Express news service

THIRUVANANTHAPURAM: ‘Manathakkali’ (black nightshade or Solanum nigrum), a berry shrub found in the backyard, is traditionally known for its medicinal value. Today, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) noticed the potential of a compound isolated from the plant to treat liver cancer, thanks to the findings of a team of scientists at the Rajiv Gandhi Center for Biotechnology (RGCB).

The US agency has given the compound an “orphan drug” designation, which helps in the development and evaluation of new treatments for rare diseases. It will also help speed up the approval of the drug. RGCB lead scientist Dr Ruby John Anto, who, along with her student Dr Lekshmi R Nath, isolated the drug molecule – Uttroside-B – from the leaves of the Manathakkali plant, said: “It doesn’t There is only one FDA approved drug available for the treatment of liver cancer at present. The compound we developed has been shown to be more effective than the one available. Toxicity evaluation in human volunteers has shown that the compound is also effective in the treatment of fatty liver disease.

The technology they patented was purchased by US pharmaceutical company QBioMed. The technology transfer was done through the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation.

According to RGCB director Dr Chandrabhas Narayana, the research will prove to be a major breakthrough in the treatment of liver disease, including liver cancer.

Manathakkali: RGCB Director Says Results Revolutionary

“The results are revolutionary, as the liver, which primarily detoxifies food while aiding digestion, is increasingly susceptible to cancer in modern times. It is estimated that malignant liver disease kills as many as 8 lakhs of people per year even though 9 lakhs of new cases are reported each year, ”said the director of the RGCB. Dr Ruby and his team are currently studying the compound’s mechanism of action and evaluating its efficacy against fatty liver disease, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, and liver cancer caused by food toxins. This is done in collaboration with Dr L Ravishankar (CSIR-NIST, Thiruvananthapuram), who has developed a new method to isolate the compound from the leaves of Solanum nigrum.


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