Liver disease – Rogalevich http://rogalevich.org/ Wed, 25 May 2022 11:00:49 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://rogalevich.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.png Liver disease – Rogalevich http://rogalevich.org/ 32 32 What is fatty liver disease? These are the signs you may have it – Eat This, Not That https://rogalevich.org/what-is-fatty-liver-disease-these-are-the-signs-you-may-have-it-eat-this-not-that/ Wed, 25 May 2022 11:00:49 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/what-is-fatty-liver-disease-these-are-the-signs-you-may-have-it-eat-this-not-that/ Fatty liver disease is exactly what its name suggests – it develops by storing excess fat in your liver. Also known as fatty liverit is quite common and affects more than 25% of individuals in the United States. There are several causes of the disease. We spoke with Dr. Mike Bohl, MD, MPH, CPH, MWC, […]]]>

Fatty liver disease is exactly what its name suggests – it develops by storing excess fat in your liver. Also known as fatty liverit is quite common and affects more than 25% of individuals in the United States. There are several causes of the disease. We spoke with Dr. Mike Bohl, MD, MPH, CPH, MWC, ELS, member of the Eat this, not that! Council of medical experts who share several typical contributors, including alcohol consumption, obesity and diabetes. Read on to learn more, and then be sure to check out The 6 Best Exercises for Strong, Toned Arms in 2022, the trainer says.

Shutterstock

Fatty liver disease is one of those medical conditions that you may not even know you have. If you experience symptoms, you may feel tired or feel discomfort in the upper right part of your stomach, according to Dr. Bohl. Additional symptoms may include inflammation of the liver, increased fatigue and/or weakness, swelling in the legs or stomach, pronounced blood vessels, and possibly yellowing of the white part of your eyes or skin.

Related: Eliminate Belly Fat With These Secret Cardio Tricks, Trainer Says

man running in central park to improve his gut health
Shutterstock

Dr. Bohl tells Eat this, not that!, “The best ways to manage fatty liver disease are to lose weight and refrain from drinking alcohol. Following a healthy diet, including eating plenty of plant-based foods and avoiding excess sugars and ‘processed foods, and exercising at least 30 minutes a day at least 5 days a week are good ways to start losing weight.’ He adds: “If you have a chronic condition, such as diabetes, take all your medications as prescribed and see your provider regularly.” If you develop any of the symptoms, it is essential to seek the help of a medical professional.

Related: The Most Effective Exercises For Reversing Aging After 50, According To The Trainer

doctor patient close up fatty liver disease
Shutterstock

Most of the time, fatty liver will not create serious problems or compromise your liver function. However, 7-30% of cases may get worse over time, depending on Cleveland Clinic. In these cases, your liver may swell and its tissues may suffer damage. This will result in scar tissue. When scar tissue takes over healthy tissue, that’s when it becomes “cirrhosis of the liver,” which can interfere with the functioning of your liver. It could even induce liver cancer or liver failure.

Don’t wait for the warning signs when it comes to a health issue. Showing off your TLC body should be a priority. Get into a fitness routine and start eating healthy now.

happy woman is exercising walking at sunset with dumbbells
Shutterstock

For more mind and body news, check out Reduce Belly Fat Faster With These Walking Workouts, Trainer Says and The Best Exercises to Get Rid of a Fat Belly In Your 40s, Trainer Says.

Alexa Mellardo

Alexa is the associate editor of Eat This, Not That!’s Mind + Body, overseeing the M+B channel and bringing readers compelling stories about fitness, wellness and self-care. Read more

]]>
Fatty liver disease can often be cured with lifestyle changes https://rogalevich.org/fatty-liver-disease-can-often-be-cured-with-lifestyle-changes/ Mon, 23 May 2022 16:30:32 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/fatty-liver-disease-can-often-be-cured-with-lifestyle-changes/ Dr. Gabe Mirkin More than 80 million North Americans have non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and many are unaware they have it because most people with fatty liver disease have normal liver function blood tests at first. stages of the disease. The American Association of Clinical Endocrinology, supported by the American Association for the Study […]]]>
Dr. Gabe Mirkin

More than 80 million North Americans have non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and many are unaware they have it because most people with fatty liver disease have normal liver function blood tests at first. stages of the disease. The American Association of Clinical Endocrinology, supported by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, has just released new guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of NAFLD (presented at the AACE annual meeting on May 12 2022 and published in endocrine practice2022 May 1;28(5):528-562).

Fatty liver disease is common even in people who never drink alcohol (Gastroenterology, August 23, 2018). Today, fatty liver disease is much more likely to be caused by eating foods with lots of added sugar and/or eating mammal meat. Since blood tests are often normal in early cases of NAFLD, the disease is often diagnosed with an ultrasound image that shows fat as white spots throughout the liver.

NAFLD can usually be treated in its early stages with an anti-inflammatory diet and exercise program, any weight loss program, and even bariatric surgery when obesity is extreme. Currently, there are no FDA-approved drugs to treat NAFLD, but some drugs such as pioglitazone or glucagon-like peptide-1 agonists may increase the benefits of lifestyle changes.

Without drastic lifestyle changes, NAFLD can lead to diabetes, heart attacks, strokes, liver cancer, liver failure, liver transplants, and premature death. Over 70% of patients with type II diabetes and over 90% of obese patients with diabetes have NAFLD, and over 20% of these patients already have permanent damage called cirrhosis, where healthy liver tissue is replaced by scar tissue.

How Belly Fat Predicts Fatty Liver Disease and Type II Diabetes
People who store fat primarily in their belly are also more likely to store a large amount of fat in their liver. You can often identify who is susceptible to fatty liver disease and type II diabetes just by looking at a person. People with large bellies and small buttocks are at very high risk for diabetes and heart attacks (JAMA, 2017;317(6):626-634). To prevent your blood sugar from rising too high after eating, your pancreas releases insulin which is believed to reduce high blood sugar levels by driving sugar from the bloodstream into the liver. However, if your liver is full of fat, the excess fat prevents the liver from accepting sugar and blood sugar may rise even higher (Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol2016 Dec;28(12):1443-1449). A sharp rise in blood sugar results in high levels of insulin in the blood which converts blood sugar into a type of fat called triglycerides. Then the insulin drives the triglycerides into your liver. Having high triglycerides and a big belly increases a person’s chances of having high levels of insulin in the blood and high levels of insulin in the arteries to cause heart attacks. Insulin also works on your brain to make you eat more, on your liver to make more fat, and on the fat cells in your belly to store that fat. Lean people with NAFLD are at high risk for diabetes and heart disease (MedPage todayMay 14, 2022).

• Belly fat storage is a greater risk factor for diabetes than just being overweight and is arguably the most common cause of type II diabetes in North America today (BMC Public Health, November 18, 2019). In one study, 11% of 5,228 non-obese people had excess belly fat, and those normal-weight people with large bellies had significantly higher levels of blood pressure, fasting blood sugar, total cholesterol, and triglycerides. indicating an increased risk of diabetes and heart problems. attacks.

• Measuring a person’s waist circumference is a simple and effective way to see if people who are not overweight are still at increased risk of diabetes (Arch Med Sci Civil Dis, 2019 Jul 22;4:e64–e71). Men are at increased risk for diabetes if their waist circumference is over 38 inches, and women if it is over 36 inches.

To see Excess fat in your liver increases the risk of heart attacks, strokes and dementia

My recommendations
If you have a big belly, dramatic lifestyle changes can save your life. I believe everyone should follow a anti-inflammatory lifestyle which helps prevent excess fat from being deposited in the liver.
• Lose weight if you are overweight
• Eat lots of vegetables, fruits, beans, nuts and other seeds
• Avoid sugary drinks (including fruit juices) and foods
• Limit refined carbohydrates — flour-based foods such as baked goods, pasta, and most dry breakfast cereals.
• Avoid red meat and processed meats
• Avoid smoking and recreational drug use, and avoid or limit alcohol
• Try to exercise every day

Dr. Gabe Mirkin is a villager. Learn more about www.drmirkin.com

]]>
NGO concerned about mysterious liver disease in children https://rogalevich.org/ngo-concerned-about-mysterious-liver-disease-in-children/ Sat, 21 May 2022 05:09:47 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/ngo-concerned-about-mysterious-liver-disease-in-children/ A NON-GOVERNMENTAL organization has expressed concern about reported incidences of a mysterious liver disease that has affected children in Europe, the United States and Indonesia. Childhope Philippines said the incidence of liver disease was widespread in countries where they claimed the pandemic was over, such as the UK and the US, and where there had […]]]>

A NON-GOVERNMENTAL organization has expressed concern about reported incidences of a mysterious liver disease that has affected children in Europe, the United States and Indonesia.

Childhope Philippines said the incidence of liver disease was widespread in countries where they claimed the pandemic was over, such as the UK and the US, and where there had been a resurgence in cases due to the variants. Omicron recombinants.

He cited reports from USA Today and the Washington Post, which noted that the World Health Organization had been “alarmed” after a child died of said liver disease and 169 cases had been reported. in a dozen countries.

The report also says the first cases were reported in the UK, where 114 children were affected by the disease.

The WHO said the cases may have been linked to a virus commonly associated with the common cold, but added that it had not yet investigated the cause. Twenty of the children who had the liver disease had tested positive for coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19).

Childhope also cited a CBS News report, where three children in Indonesia died in hospitals from liver disease.

He reported that the children had symptoms including nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal pain, as well as fever, jaundice, seizures and loss of consciousness.

Elizabeth Whittaker, a pediatric infectious disease specialist at the University of London, said the cases were “extremely unusual” as the cases came from healthy children under the age of 5.

She added that most of the evidence points to two suspects such as adenovirus, which is a common family of viruses, and the Covid-19 virus.

Dr Jaime Galvez-Tan, president of Childhope Philippines, said he was “concerned” about cases of mysterious outbreaks of hepatitis in the United States, Europe and Indonesia, where some children have also tested positive for Covid- 19.

He urged children to stay away from crowded places even though there is no confirmation yet if these conditions are related.

“Nevertheless, we advise children to stay away from crowds. Parents should take children to hospital immediately if they suffer from nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or abdominal pain,” added Galvez- Tan.

In a separate briefing. Dr Benito Atienza, pediatrician and president of the Philippine Medical Association, said vaccinating children with the hepatitis B vaccine is important to prevent the prevalence of liver disease as well as liver cancer 30 years later. have been infected with hepatitis.

“Hepatitis B [vaccine] ay pagkapanganak, after one month in saka after six months ay ibinibigay, napakahalaga po nito, para maiwasan natin ang (Hepatitis B vaccine should be administered after birth, after one month and after six months, so that the child can prevent) liver cancer later in life,” Atienza added.

]]>
PFAS linked to increased cases of liver disease in humans, scientists say https://rogalevich.org/pfas-linked-to-increased-cases-of-liver-disease-in-humans-scientists-say/ Fri, 20 May 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/pfas-linked-to-increased-cases-of-liver-disease-in-humans-scientists-say/ Maine currently relies on PFAS contamination in everything from drinking water to wild deer. But there are still many unknowns about the effects of chemicals. Here’s an overview of what we know so far and fill out this form if you have any questions. Three of the most commonly detected PFAS – often called “eternal […]]]>

Maine currently relies on PFAS contamination in everything from drinking water to wild deer. But there are still many unknowns about the effects of chemicals. Here’s an overview of what we know so far and fill out this form if you have any questions.

Three of the most commonly detected PFAS – often called “eternal chemicals” because they break down slowly in the environment – ​​have been linked to an enzyme that indicates non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, a study from the Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California recently published in Environmental Health Perspectives.

These specific chemicals are called PFOS, PFOA, and PFNA, and are three of the most studied chemicals forever found in products such as nonstick pans, rainwear, and take-out containers.

Why is this important: Maine relies on PFAS contamination in everything from drinking water and agricultural soil to freshwater fish and wild deer. But it is still unclear how much of the chemicals must be consumed to be considered dangerous to our health, and what the effects of the chemicals are. PFAS have been linked to liver damage, thyroid disease, decreased fertility, high cholesterol, obesity, hormone suppression, and cancer.

]]>
Ray Charles health: Singer died of liver disease – the condition explained https://rogalevich.org/ray-charles-health-singer-died-of-liver-disease-the-condition-explained/ Mon, 16 May 2022 14:30:00 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/ray-charles-health-singer-died-of-liver-disease-the-condition-explained/ Over the years, the blind musician, who had worked with legends Frank Sinatra and Aretha Franklin, made a name for himself as a genre-defining musician. Charles shared his incredible talent with the world from the 1940s to the 2000s until it was reported that the star had died at the age of 73. Charles overcame […]]]>

Over the years, the blind musician, who had worked with legends Frank Sinatra and Aretha Franklin, made a name for himself as a genre-defining musician. Charles shared his incredible talent with the world from the 1940s to the 2000s until it was reported that the star had died at the age of 73.

Charles overcame many challenges in his life, including blindness and a heroin addiction.

When he was growing up, Charles contracted a disease that left him blind within three years.

According to the Ray Charles Foundation, the disease was glaucoma, a condition in which the optic nerve connecting the eye to the brain is damaged.

Despite his illness, while in school in Florida, Charles’ artistic prowess shone as he learned to read Braille, listen to the radio, and play the piano, clarinet, saxophone, trumpet and organ.

READ MORE: Cancer symptoms: The ‘feeling’ that hits first thing in the morning – it’s a red flag

Cirrhosis is an irreversible disease when the liver has developed major scarring

People with cirrhosis who don’t stop drinking have less than a 50% chance of living five years or more, says the NHS.

Alcoholic fatty liver disease

Before developing hepatitis and cirrhosis, people may have a reversible condition known as fatty liver disease – when fat builds up in the liver.

Even a few days of drinking can cause these fats to accumulate because alcohol alters chemical processes in the liver. The various substances produced can combine with fatty acids to create fats that accumulate in the liver.

Getting sober for two weeks can reverse the damage caused by alcoholic fatty liver disease.

]]>
Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in lean patients linked to CVD risk https://rogalevich.org/nonalcoholic-fatty-liver-disease-in-lean-patients-linked-to-cvd-risk/ Sat, 14 May 2022 20:11:25 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/nonalcoholic-fatty-liver-disease-in-lean-patients-linked-to-cvd-risk/ Lean patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) were more likely to have cardiovascular disease (CVD) than those who were overweight or obese, one researcher reported. Among more than 18,000 of these patients, a logistic regression analysis—adjusted for demographics and clinical risk factors—showed that overweight or obese patients with NAFLD were associated with a significantly […]]]>

Lean patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) were more likely to have cardiovascular disease (CVD) than those who were overweight or obese, one researcher reported.

Among more than 18,000 of these patients, a logistic regression analysis—adjusted for demographics and clinical risk factors—showed that overweight or obese patients with NAFLD were associated with a significantly lower prevalence of any cardiovascular disease compared to lean patients, according to Karn Wijarnpreecha, MD, MPH, of the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. Specifically:

  • Overweight: odds ratio 0.8, 95% CI 0.6-0.9
  • Class 1 obesity: OR 0.7, 95% CI 0.6-0.9
  • Obesity class 2-3: OR 0.7, 95% CI 0.6-0.8

While lean patients had a lower prevalence of cirrhosis, diabetes, dyslipidemia, hypertension, chronic kidney disease (CKD) and other metabolic diseases, they had a higher prevalence of stroke and of peripheral arterial disease, Wijarnpreecha said during a press briefing ahead of Digestive Disease Week.

“We think it could be due to a difference in lifestyle, diet, exercise, genetics, or even microbiota,” he said. “These are the factors that we did not consider in this current study and could explain why the lean group has the highest association or prevalence of cardiovascular disease.”

Multisystem NAFLD develops more frequently in obese patients and often presents without symptoms. NAFLD can lead to conditions unrelated to the liver such as metabolic disease, CKD, and CVD. However, about 10-20% of people with a normal BMI can still develop NAFLD. According to Wijarnpreecha and colleagues, there remains a lack of data on whether people with a normal BMI who develop NAFLD have less severe liver disease, CKD, or CVD than those with NAFLD. obesity.

“Our team expected to see that people with a normal BMI would have a lower prevalence of any metabolic or cardiovascular condition, so we were very surprised to find this link to cardiovascular disease,” Wijarnpreecha said. “Too often we overlook NAFLD patients with normal BMIs because we assume their risk of more serious diseases is lower than those of overweight people. But this way of thinking can put these patients at risk.”

The authors retrospectively reviewed electronic health record data of 18,594 adults diagnosed with NAFLD at the University of Michigan Hospital (n=10,220) from January 1, 2012 to February 28, 2021 and a Michigan NAFLD cohort ( n = 8,374; Wijarnpreecha did not specify the source of these data). Of these, 2,137 were underweight (BMI 18.5-24.9), 4,692 were overweight (BMI 25-29.9), 5,234 were class 1 obese (BMI 30-34.9) and 6,531 had class 2-3 obesity (BMI 35-<40), based on the BMI threshold recommendations for Asians and non-Asians provided by the World Health Organization.

Diagnoses of NAFLD were confirmed by liver biopsy, the presence of hepatic steatosis on imaging, or a controlled attenuation parameter greater than 250 db/m on transient vibration-controlled elastography. Patients with excessive alcohol consumption, alcohol-related disease and cancer, among others, were excluded. Multivariate analysis adjusted for age, sex, race, smoking, diabetes, dyslipidemia and hypertension.

Overall, more than half of patients in all weight categories were female, Caucasian (78% to 82%), and never smokers (56% to 57%), the most common comorbidities being hypertension (42% to 60%). , dyslipidemia (34%-52%) and any CVD (29%-33%). Obese patients tended to have a higher prevalence of cirrhosis (4.7%).

The current study was retrospective and performed at a single medical center. The authors concluded that “NAFLD in lean people is not a benign disease and that “attention to cardiac risk stratification and intervention is warranted for lean patients with NAFLD.”

“The results are interesting because the authors found a significantly increased prevalence of cardiovascular disease compared to overweight/obese people, even though the prevalence of risk factors for atherosclerotic disease and metabolic disease was lower,” said Andrew Talal. , MD, of the University at Buffalo in New York said MedPage today. “Primary care physicians, endocrinologists, hepatologists, and public health officials should consider screening for cardiovascular disease in lean people with NAFLD.”

“Future work is warranted to investigate the effect of modifying CVD risk factors in lean people with NAFLD,” said Talal, who was not involved in this study.

  • Zaina Hamza is a writer for MedPage Today, covering gastroenterology and infectious diseases. She is based in Chicago.

Disclosures

Wijarnpreecha and its co-authors have disclosed no relationship with the industry.

]]>
Edinburgh patient tells how collapsing street was first sign of liver disease https://rogalevich.org/edinburgh-patient-tells-how-collapsing-street-was-first-sign-of-liver-disease/ Fri, 13 May 2022 12:00:54 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/edinburgh-patient-tells-how-collapsing-street-was-first-sign-of-liver-disease/ A patient has shared how his life has changed since receiving an urgent liver transplant in Edinburgh. John Mortimer, 64, was first diagnosed with liver disease and cirrhosis of the liver in 2016 after suddenly collapsing on the side of the road. A ‘social’ drinker and member of the Merchant Navy for 28 years, John […]]]>

A patient has shared how his life has changed since receiving an urgent liver transplant in Edinburgh.

John Mortimer, 64, was first diagnosed with liver disease and cirrhosis of the liver in 2016 after suddenly collapsing on the side of the road.

A ‘social’ drinker and member of the Merchant Navy for 28 years, John quit drinking just three months after learning he would need a liver transplant.

READ MORE – Edinburgh’s popular footbridge finally reopens after nine years with a new makeover

In rapid decline after his diagnosis, John had been anxiously awaiting the call to come to Edinburgh from his home in Falkirk for the operation, with the life-saving operation finally taking place in February 2019.

Speaking to Edinburgh Live, John said: “I found out in December 2016 that I have diabetes and was walking home and ended up collapsing in the street, kind people called an ambulance and they wanted to take me to the hospital but I refused.

“Then the next week the same thing happened again and this time I went to the hospital, they did a lot of tests and told me I had sclerosis of the liver. It was a downward journey from there i started to really suffer and i was seeing a lot of counselors.

“They were telling me about it, but it took me about three months to stop drinking, and I haven’t had a drink since.

“Six weeks later I got a call and they said there was a liver for me so I went to Edinburgh around 10pm, the liver arrived around 5am but the surgeon looked at it and wasn’t happy with it so I was sent in. At this point I was coming down really fast, I was also suffering from illnesses from the toxins that affect things like your memory.



Get all the latest news and headlines from Edinburgh, Fife and Lothians straight to your inbox twice a day by signing up to our free newsletter.

From breaking news to breaking news on the coronavirus crisis in Scotland, we’ve got you covered.

The morning newsletter arrives before 9 a.m. daily and the evening newsletter, hand-curated by the team, is sent out at 6:30 p.m., giving you insight into the most important stories of the day.

To sign up, simply enter your email address in this link here and select Daily News.

“11 months later it was February 2019 and I got the call to come back to Edinburgh so I did, got the transplant and haven’t looked back , things have been really good since.”

Seeing huge improvements after the operation, John received shocking news just weeks after the operation that his old liver was in fact cancerous.

Taken aback by the surgeons’ results, John explained that if the transplant hadn’t happened when it did, he would have only had a few months to live.

He added: “It was six weeks later, I was back and they said they wanted to tell me about my own liver which had been removed. They said when they removed it they found five cancerous tumors on it, if I hadn’t had a transplant at that time and if I had, I would have been given six months to live.

“It’s pretty scary when someone says you have cancer, but the surgeons assured me everything was removed.”

Now working to support others in similar situations and raise awareness about liver disease, John will volunteer with the Love Your Liver Screening Unit during his UK tour.



I love your liver screening unit
The unit will be in Edinburgh on May 17

Arriving in Edinburgh on May 17 at the Mound Precinct, the Screening and Scanning Unit will be able to assess their risk of contracting liver disease, find out what preventive measures they can take and be offered a free liver scan.

John said: “I’ve done a lot of community work, I’m back at university doing my HNC for two and a half years, and I’ve also been to the Edinburgh Royal to do peer support at the transplant unit talk to people in the same place as me.

“I think the screening unit is really important because a lot of people when you ask them, there’s still a stigma around liver disease and alcohol, so a lot of people don’t understand how many varieties there are. there are and how many people have it They I don’t know how great an organ the liver is and how important it is in day to day life so it’s fantastic to see things like this happening produce.”

Anyone wishing to take advantage of the Love your Liver event must attend between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. If you would like to be scanned, please arrive early as space is limited.

If you can’t attend the event, you can still find out if you’re at risk and check your liver health online by taking the online screening test at https://www.britishlivertrust.org.uk/screener

]]>
Fatty liver disease — The Downey Patriot https://rogalevich.org/fatty-liver-disease-the-downey-patriot/ Thu, 12 May 2022 15:57:48 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/fatty-liver-disease-the-downey-patriot/ Did you know that the liver is the second largest organ in our body? As blood leaves our stomach and intestines, it passes through the liver. The liver processes this blood; breaks it down, balances it, creates nutrients, and metabolizes drugs into more usable forms. Fatty liver disease occurs when fat builds up in the […]]]>

Did you know that the liver is the second largest organ in our body? As blood leaves our stomach and intestines, it passes through the liver. The liver processes this blood; breaks it down, balances it, creates nutrients, and metabolizes drugs into more usable forms. Fatty liver disease occurs when fat builds up in the liver. It is also known as fatty liver and is a common condition. What should you know about fatty liver disease?

It is normal for the liver to contain fat, but too much leads to inflammation, which can cause damage and scarring. In severe cases, this scarring can lead to liver failure. Fatty liver disease in those who drink a lot of alcohol is called alcoholic fatty liver disease (AFLD), and in others it is called non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

NAFLD is the most common chronic liver disease here in the United States. About 55% to 75% of obese people probably have some degree of NAFLD. Perhaps 20% of people with AFLD will progress to cirrhosis, and they account for about 50% of cirrhosis deaths worldwide. For people with NAFLD, perhaps 5-12% progress to cirrhosis. Fatty liver disease is the most common cause of liver transplantation.

NAFLD and AFLD have four typical stages:

· Stage 1: Simple fatty liver. There is an accumulation of excess fat. Simple fatty liver disease is usually not harmful if it does not progress. For many, there are no symptoms.

Stage 2: Steatohepatitis. In addition to excess fat, there is inflammation.

Stage 3: Fibrosis. Persistent inflammation leads to scarring. However, the liver can still function normally.

Stage 4: Cirrhosis. The scarring has become widespread, impairing the ability of the liver to function. This is the most serious phase, potentially fatal and irreversible.

Cirrhosis has a number of really terrible symptoms, including abdominal pain, loss of appetite, weight loss, weakness, nausea, itchy skin, yellowing of the skin and eyes (jaundice), easy bruising or bleeding, dark-colored urine, pale stools, fluid accumulation in the abdomen, swelling of the legs, clumps of blood vessels under the skin, breast enlargement, and even confusion. And, of course, it can lead to liver failure. In addition, steatohepatitis and cirrhosis are risk factors for hepatocellular carcinoma, the most common form of liver cancer.

The cause of AFLD is simple: drinking too much alcohol. Alcohol can impair certain metabolic processes in the liver, and when the products combine with fatty acids, there is an excessive accumulation of fat. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention define heavy drinking as 15 or more drinks per week for men and eight or more drinks per week for women.

Causes of NAFLD include obesity, type 2 diabetes, and high cholesterol, as well as pregnancy, certain medications, hepatitis C, and some rare genetic diseases.

The diagnosis of fatty liver disease is usually made when blood tests show elevated liver enzymes, which indicates inflammation. It appears on ultrasound, CT or MRI. A liver biopsy will indicate its severity.

If you are diagnosed with this condition, even if you are not yet experiencing symptoms or liver function problems, it is essential to take steps to stop or reverse it. There is no medicine to treat fatty liver disease. However, in most cases, lifestyle changes can manage it and even reverse the damage. The key steps are to quit drinking alcohol, lose weight, change your diet, exercise, and avoid drugs or supplements that are harsh on the liver.

I encourage you to consider a diagnosis of fatty liver disease as an early warning sign. Use this advice to avoid life-threatening cirrhosis or liver cancer. As always, talk to your doctor and work out a plan together.

Dr. Alan Frischer is former chief of staff and former chief of medicine at Downey Regional Medical Center. Write to him care of this journal at 8301 E. Florence Ave., Suite 100, Downey, CA 90240.

]]>
Drinking coffee may reduce the risk of fibrosis in liver disease https://rogalevich.org/drinking-coffee-may-reduce-the-risk-of-fibrosis-in-liver-disease/ Tue, 10 May 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/drinking-coffee-may-reduce-the-risk-of-fibrosis-in-liver-disease/ The researchers said the result meant it could be immediately used in real-life situations, as increased coffee consumption may benefit patients at risk of advanced liver disease. The study indicates that patients chronically infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) are at high risk of liver fibrosis, cirrhosis and liver cancer, despite recent therapeutic advances. They […]]]>

The researchers said the result meant it could be immediately used in real-life situations, as increased coffee consumption may benefit patients at risk of advanced liver disease.

The study indicates that patients chronically infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) are at high risk of liver fibrosis, cirrhosis and liver cancer, despite recent therapeutic advances.

They added: “It is therefore crucial to find non-pharmaceutical options for the prevention of liver fibrosis in this population.

“Based on cross-sectional data from the ANRS CO22 Hepather cohort, we sought to identify the socio-demographic and modifiable risk factors for significant fibrosis in chronic HBV patients.​.”

Observational study

The ANRS CO22 HEPATHER cohort is a French therapeutic option for humans and a multicenter, national, prospective, observational study of patients infected with the hepatitis B or C virus.

The researchers said logistic regression models were used to test associations between explanatory variables and significant fibrosis, assessed by three noninvasive markers: platelet aspartate aminotransferase ratio index, FIB-4 and gamma ratio. platelet glutamyltransferase (GPR). Analyzes were stratified by hepatitis B treatment status.

The study population included 2065 untreated patients and 1727 patients treated for chronic hepatitis B.

The researchers concluded:High coffee consumption was consistently associated with a lower risk of elevated fibrosis biomarkers in all three treated participant models, suggesting a dose-response relationship.

]]>
An international forum on non-alcoholic liver disease will be held in Santander by researchers from the Valdecilla Research Institute (IDIVAL) and IS Global https://rogalevich.org/an-international-forum-on-non-alcoholic-liver-disease-will-be-held-in-santander-by-researchers-from-the-valdecilla-research-institute-idival-and-is-global/ Fri, 06 May 2022 17:46:00 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/an-international-forum-on-non-alcoholic-liver-disease-will-be-held-in-santander-by-researchers-from-the-valdecilla-research-institute-idival-and-is-global/ The International Forum for Precision Medicine: Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease will be moderated by researchers from the Valdecilla Research Institute (IDIVAL), Paula Iruzubieta and Javier Crespoand Jeff LazarusHead of Health Systems Research Group at IS Global Barcelona (NAFLD). This virtual forum must take place between May 9 and May 18, 2022. This forum will include […]]]>

The International Forum for Precision Medicine: Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease will be moderated by researchers from the Valdecilla Research Institute (IDIVAL), Paula Iruzubieta and Javier Crespoand Jeff LazarusHead of Health Systems Research Group at IS Global Barcelona (NAFLD). This virtual forum must take place between May 9 and May 18, 2022. This forum will include an updated training program in which clinicians and researchers will discuss the issues and important components of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease research. This news is published by Index of Sciences Ltd.

SANTANDER, Spain, May 6, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Since the forum is online, it aims to have a larger and more diverse audience both nationally and internationally. Registration is completely free. Here is the link to register:

https://aplicacionesidival.idival.org/ConvocatoriasPropias/en/Convocatorias/VerConvocatoria?Id=891

For the comfort of the participants, the presence is not obligatory. One can attend different sessions or the entire program as per one’s convenience. To gain greater reach, the slides for each presentation will be in English while a few will be in Spanish and English.

The forum will take place between 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Spain time. At the end of each session, an interactive discussion will be organized between the speakers and the clinicians and researchers present.

An overview of the program is presented below;

  • On May 9, researchers from around the world will talk about the concept, epidemiology and burden of this disease. Speakers include

  • Jeff Lazare (UNITED STATES)

  • Javier Crespo (Spain)

  • Marco Arrese (Chile) and

  • Graciela Castro (Mexico)

  • On May 10, the pathogenetic basis of the disease will be discussed at length. Speakers include

  • Dr. Martínez-Chantar (Spain) and Dr. Paula Iruzubieta (Spain) will shed light on their translational research.

  • Expert hepatologist and endocrinologist, Drs. Schattenberg (Germany) and Antonio Pérez (Spain) will explain screening and the relationship of this disease with diabetes.

  • On May 11 clinical trials involving NAFLD will be presented. Speakers will include

  • The first two presentations will be given by Dr. Mary E Rinella (UNITED STATES) and Dr. John F. Dillon (Dundee, UK), who will discuss the goals and challenges of NAFLD trials.

  • dr. Calleja (Spain) and dr. Crespo (Spain) will present two very original clinical trials: the efficacy of vertical endoscopic gastroplasty and the transplantation of fecal microbiota as in patients with NASH.

  • On May 16, clinical trials will be discussed in more detail, but from an industry perspective. Speakers will include

  • Juan Basterra(Spain)-CEO of a start-up

  • Salvador Augustin (Spain)-Senior Clinical Program Leader of a large company

  • dr. Kenneth Cusi (UNITED STATES) will talk about the necessary multidisciplinary vision of this
    sickness.

  • On May 17, the impact of changing patient habits and its influence on the improvement of this disease will be discussed. Speakers will include

  • Dr. Romero (Spain) – Role of nutrition in NAFLD

  • Dr Bataller (UNITED STATES) Role of alcohol and how to assess its consumption

  • Shira Zelber-Sagi (Israel)

  • Eva Pérez Bech and Dr. Albillos. Real patient needs

  • At the closing date, i.e. May 18, NAFLD as a public health opportunity will be presented. Speakers include

  • Dr Arias (Spain) – how telemedicine can help

  • Dr. Mateo (Spain) and Jeff Lazarus -Keys to the Global Public Health Agenda for NAFLD

Each registered participant will receive (at the end of the program) the presentations and an e-book with the main contributions of each speaker.

About the International Precision Medicine Forum organized by IDIVAL

The International Precision Medicine Forum organized by IDIVAL began on February 14, which intends to review, from the perspective of different specialties and fields of knowledge, the main aspects related to clinical research and precision medicine.

For its first phase, the program currently has nearly a hundred conferences planned, given by national and international speakers who are leaders in their field, who will review the main issues and aspects of clinical research. A program endorsed by the ITEMAS Platform and the Biobanks and Biomodels Platform of the Carlos III Health Institute and the Spanish Society of Clinical Pharmacology and which benefits from the collaboration of scientific societies, more than 60 international institutions and backed by 8 major pharmaceutical companies. till date.

Liver disease is a leading cause of years of working life lost in Europe, just behind ischemic heart disease. And, without a doubt, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in our environment. Advances in the prevention and treatment of NAFLD are closely linked to the understanding of this disease from the pathophysiological and clinical point of view as a basis for a better definition of risk factors, the establishment of adequate predictors of disease progression , the definition of new biomarkers . and the individualization of the therapy adapted to the characteristics of each patient. This module will review the major advances in this disease by some of the world’s leading specialists in this field. Without a doubt, a course that will allow us to dive deeply into this disease.

This program offers a qualitative leap in training in precision medicine and clinical research, thus providing advanced knowledge of the research process.

About Index of Sciences Ltd

Index of Sciences Ltd is a trusted and compassionate online science database that provides the tips and tricks you need to improve your health.

PRESS CONTACT
Stella Richards
+441442781196
https://www.indexofsciences.com

Quote

Show original content to download multimedia:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/international-forum-on-non-alcohol-liver-disease-to-take-place-in-santander-by-researchers-from-the-valdecilla-research- institute-idival-and-is-global-301541819.html

SOURCE Index of Sciences Ltd

]]>