Liver disease – Rogalevich http://rogalevich.org/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 09:56:33 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://rogalevich.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.png Liver disease – Rogalevich http://rogalevich.org/ 32 32 Fabricated video falsely promotes ‘shandy supplement for liver disease’ in the Philippines https://rogalevich.org/fabricated-video-falsely-promotes-shandy-supplement-for-liver-disease-in-the-philippines/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 09:56:33 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/fabricated-video-falsely-promotes-shandy-supplement-for-liver-disease-in-the-philippines/ Copyright AFP 2017-2022. All rights reserved. An alleged story about a liver supplement with “guaranteed therapeutic effects” allegedly endorsed by Philippine health authorities and endorsed by doctors has been viewed more than a million times on Facebook. However, the video was created from old news and commercial clips to promote an unregistered supplement that the […]]]>

Copyright AFP 2017-2022. All rights reserved.

An alleged story about a liver supplement with “guaranteed therapeutic effects” allegedly endorsed by Philippine health authorities and endorsed by doctors has been viewed more than a million times on Facebook. However, the video was created from old news and commercial clips to promote an unregistered supplement that the Philippine Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has said has not been approved.

The video has been published here on Facebook on August 4, 2022. It has been viewed over a million times.

It appears to show a segment of 24 Oras — an evening news program on the Philippine television station GMA — with a reporter Arnold Clavio saying, “About eight million Filipinos have hepatitis B, according to the Ministry of Health.

“To mark World Hepatitis Day, a group calls for eliminating the stigma around people who suffer from the disease. Reporting by Cedric Castillo.”

After 18 seconds of the video, it shows an alleged interview with Ian Homer Cua, President of the Hepatological Society of the Philippines (HSP) who has since said in a post on Facebook that his image was used to create “fake news” for the announcement of the supplement.

As Cua’s face is shown in the fabricated video, a narrator can be heard saying in Tagalog: “After many years of research, we have successfully used Germany’s proprietary nanotechnology to destroy broken liver cells to support the treatment of hepatitis, liver failure, cirrhosis, liver cancer.”

The video then cuts to clips promoting a supplement called Cagan Nano, which it says is “100% natural” and can “penetrate deep into cells to restore them, and helps lower liver enzymes.”

It claims Cagan Nano’s “advanced technology” meets global standards and says the product has been approved by drug regulators around the world and has been endorsed by the US National Academy of Sciences.

The caption reads: “Good news for people with liver disease has emerged in the Philippines.” He claims that patients with liver disease can take the supplement “twice a day” to “reverse hepatitis (sic)” in order to “avoid hospital visits.

Screenshot of the fake post, taken September 16, 2022.

Philippine health authorities have called liver disease a “silent epidemic”, according to the official Philippine News Agency. reportedwith over 18 million Filipinos estimated to be at risk of fatty liver disease.

Similar videos were shared with Facebook posts promoting Cagan Nano here, here, and here.

However, the claims in the video – posted by a Account impersonate the official Facebook page of 24 Oras — are false.

Fabricated video

The video was created from news clips from Filipino broadcaster GMA which were posted on its official YouTube channel in 2017.

Newscaster Arnold Clavio’s 15-second opening clip was taken from this July 2017 Report on the social stigma faced by people infected with hepatitis B.

The following clip of the interview with HSP President Cua was taken from this January 2017 report, in which he explains the difficulties of diagnosing people with hepatitis B.

Below are comparisons of screenshots from the doctored video (left) and original reports from 24 Oras (right):

Falsified report on July 17. Screenshot taken September 20, 2022.
Falsified report on January 17. Screenshot taken September 20, 2022.

Product not registered

The Philippines FDA Drug Regulatory and Research Center The director’s office told AFP the product was unregistered and warned people to be wary of such advertisements on social media.

“To ensure the safety, efficacy and quality of health products, please make sure to buy health products only from a FDA-approved establishment,” he said.

Cagan Nano has also not been approved by the United States’ Food and Drug Administration, a keyword search was also found.

In a Attention issued on August 19, 2022, the HSP denied approving the supplement and advised patients to seek medical attention for any liver-related issues.

“HSP is in no way related to the Cagan Nano supplement. It also does NOT support its claims for liver disease,” he said.

Dana Korsen, director of media relations at the US National Academy of Sciences, also told AFP that she neither endorsed nor endorsed Cagan Nano.

“I am not aware of any control by the National Academy of Sciences of this product,” she told AFP.

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High Cholesterol Diet May Accelerate Fatty Liver Disease https://rogalevich.org/high-cholesterol-diet-may-accelerate-fatty-liver-disease/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 20:58:15 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/high-cholesterol-diet-may-accelerate-fatty-liver-disease/ The link between a high-fat, high-sugar diet and fatty liver disease is well known, but a new study by researchers at USC’s Keck School of Medicine has found that cholesterol can affect the progression of fatty liver disease . Posted in Frontiers in immunologythe lab study found that a high cholesterol intake can increase the […]]]>

The link between a high-fat, high-sugar diet and fatty liver disease is well known, but a new study by researchers at USC’s Keck School of Medicine has found that cholesterol can affect the progression of fatty liver disease .

Posted in Frontiers in immunologythe lab study found that a high cholesterol intake can increase the likelihood of fatty liver disease progressing to cirrhosis, which causes inflammation and scarring that can persist despite switching to a low-cholesterol diet, as well as cancer of the liver.

The study also found that a diet high in cholesterol can lead to long-term dysfunction in a group of immune cells known to play a role in fatty liver disease.

“We’ve seen that you can have a diet high in fat and sugar, but when you add high cholesterol to it, it speeds up the process that causes inflammation in your liver,” said corresponding author Ana Maretti. -Mira, PhD, an assistant research professor of medicine at USC, in a Keck press release. “People focus on high cholesterol as a risk for heart disease, but we’ve shown that your liver can also be affected, causing inflammation, scarring and, potentially, cirrhosis.”

For the study, the researchers divided the mice into three groups and fed them different levels of cholesterol in their food for six months, or about half the lifespan of a mouse.

After six months, mice in all three groups accumulated fat on their livers, a harmless symptom of fatty liver disease, but the group with the highest cholesterol levels had more advanced disease, characterized by increased inflammation and scar tissue.

Maretti-Mara noted that the high-fat, high-sugar diet given to the mice in the study is similar to the average Western diet in humans. She also pointed out that instead of eliminating cholesterol completely, people should eat it in moderation because our bodies need a certain amount of fat, including cholesterol, to function properly.

“It’s all about balance,” Maretti-Mira said. “If what you eat and how much you eat is causing this excessive inflammation of your liver, it’s time to take care of yourself. Change your diet and exercise more so you can burn that fat in the liver, as it can cause long-term damage.


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Liver Disease Treatment Market Report 2022-2027: Size, Share, Industry Growth, Analysis https://rogalevich.org/liver-disease-treatment-market-report-2022-2027-size-share-industry-growth-analysis/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 18:34:00 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/liver-disease-treatment-market-report-2022-2027-size-share-industry-growth-analysis/ Liver Disease Treatment Market Report The global liver disease treatment market size reached US$ 20.83 billion in 2021. By 2027, it will reach US$ 30.91 billion, growing at a CAGR of 6.50%. SHERIDAN, WYOMING, USA, September 16, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — The latest research study “Liver Disease Treatment Market: Global Industry Trends, Share, Size, Growth, Opportunity […]]]>

Liver Disease Treatment Market Report

The global liver disease treatment market size reached US$ 20.83 billion in 2021. By 2027, it will reach US$ 30.91 billion, growing at a CAGR of 6.50%.

SHERIDAN, WYOMING, USA, September 16, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — The latest research study “Liver Disease Treatment Market: Global Industry Trends, Share, Size, Growth, Opportunity and Forecast 2022-2027” by IMARC Group concludes that the global liver disease treatment market reached a value of US$20.83 billion in 2021. Looking ahead, IMARC Group expects the market to reach a value of US$30.91 billion by 2027, with a CAGR by 6.50% over the period 2022-2027.

The liver is a vital organ in the human body that performs various functions such as separating nutrients and waste products as they move through the digestive system, removing harmful substances from the blood, and maintaining an adequate balance of products chemicals in the body. Liver disease can be hereditary or caused by various factors such as viruses, alcohol, and obesity. These conditions can lead to scarring (cirrhosis) or liver failure, if not treated at an early stage. Accordingly, the treatment of liver disease plays a vital role in improving cholesterol, hormone excretion, bile synthesis and enzyme activation.

Request a free sample PDF for more detailed market information: https://www.imarcgroup.com/liver-disease-treatment-market/requestsample

Note: We regularly track the direct effect of COVID-19 on the market, as well as the indirect influence of associated industries. These observations will be incorporated into the report.

Liver Disease Treatment Market Trends and Drivers:

The growing geriatric population, which is more susceptible to chronic diseases including liver disease, represents one of the major factors driving the market growth. In addition, the increasing prevalence of fatty liver disease caused by high cholesterol and blood pressure levels, obesity and diabetes acts as another major growth factor.

In addition to this, the introduction of various technological advancements, such as bioartificial liver, which is widely used for patients suffering from acute liver failure, is also contributing to the growth of the market. Additionally, there has been a significant increase in the use of antiviral drugs to suppress the hepatitis B virus and reduce the risk of developing cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma.

This, coupled with the expansion of the healthcare sector, creates a positive market outlook. Additionally, governments in many countries are undertaking initiatives to promote public healthcare, which is expected to provide positive market prospects in the coming years.

2022-2027 Global Liver Disease Treatment Market Analysis and Segmentation:

Competitive Landscape:

The competitive landscape of the market has been studied in the report with the detailed profiles of the major players operating in the market.

Some major key players:

Abbott Laboratories, AbbVie Inc., Astellas Pharma Inc., Bristol-Myers Squibb Company, Eli Lilly and Company, Emergent BioSolutions Inc., F. Hoffmann-La Roche AG, Gilead Sciences Inc., GlaxoSmithKline plc, Merck & Co. Inc. , Novartis AG, Pfizer Inc., Sanofi SA, Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited and Viatris Inc.

Ask the analyst for a customization and explore the full report with table of contents and list of figures: https://www.imarcgroup.com/liver-disease-treatment-market

The report has segmented the market based on region, treatment type, disease type, and end user.

Breakdown by type of treatment:
• Antiviral drugs
• Immunosuppressants
• Vaccines
• Immunoglobulins
• Corticosteroids
• Targeted therapy
• Chemotherapy

Breakdown by type of illness:
• Hepatitis
• Autoimmune diseases
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)
• Cancer
• Genetic disorders
• Others

Breakdown by end user:
• Hospitals
• Ambulatory surgery centers
• Others

Breakdown by region:
• North America: (United States, Canada)
• Asia-Pacific: (China, Japan, India, South Korea, Australia, Indonesia, others)
• Europe: (Germany, France, United Kingdom, Italy, Spain, Russia, Others)
• Latin America: (Brazil, Mexico, others)
• Middle East and Africa

If you want the latest primary and secondary data (2022-2027) with cost module, business strategy, distribution channel, etc. Click request a free sample report, the published report will be emailed to you in PDF format within 24-48 hours of receipt. full payment.

Main highlights of the report:
• Market performance (2016-2021)
• Market Outlook (2022-2027)
• Porter’s five forces analysis
• Market drivers and success factors
• SWOT analysis
• Value chain
• Complete mapping of the competitive landscape

If you need specific information that is not currently covered in the report, we can provide it to you as part of the customization.

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The IMARC Group is a leading market research firm providing management strategies and market research worldwide. We partner with clients across all industries and geographies to identify their most important opportunities, address their most critical challenges and transform their businesses.

IMARC’s information products include major business, scientific, economic and technological developments for business leaders in pharmaceutical, industrial and high-tech organizations. Market forecasts and industry analysis for biotechnology, advanced materials, pharmaceuticals, food and beverages, travel and tourism, nanotechnology and new processing methods are at the top of the list. company expertise.

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Genfit (NASDAQ:GNFT) – GENFIT Obtains Orphan Drug Status from the FDA for its Liver Disease Candidate https://rogalevich.org/genfit-nasdaqgnft-genfit-obtains-orphan-drug-status-from-the-fda-for-its-liver-disease-candidate/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 21:18:10 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/genfit-nasdaqgnft-genfit-obtains-orphan-drug-status-from-the-fda-for-its-liver-disease-candidate/ The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted Orphan Drug Designation to GENFIT GNFT drug candidate GNS5611 (ezurpimtrostat) for the treatment of cholangiocarcinoma. Preclinical studies evaluating GNS561 have been completed and a phase 1b trial confirms the rationale for targeting cholangiocarcinoma. GNS561 (ezurpimtrostat) is a Palmitoyl Protein Thioesterase-1 (PPT-1) inhibitor that blocks autophagy. Autophagy […]]]>

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted Orphan Drug Designation to GENFIT GNFT drug candidate GNS5611 (ezurpimtrostat) for the treatment of cholangiocarcinoma.

Preclinical studies evaluating GNS561 have been completed and a phase 1b trial confirms the rationale for targeting cholangiocarcinoma.

GNS561 (ezurpimtrostat) is a Palmitoyl Protein Thioesterase-1 (PPT-1) inhibitor that blocks autophagy. Autophagy is activated in tumor cells in response to certain conditions, due to tumor cell growth in advanced cancers.

Dr. Mark Yarchoan, Associate Professor of Oncology at Johns Hopkins Medicine, said: “Cholangiocarcinoma is a rare cancer with a high mortality rate. Patients have limited treatment options, especially after first-line treatment. This is why new therapies are urgently needed and is one of the reasons GNS561 has been granted orphan drug designation by the FDA. There is a real way forward for new second-line treatment options for cholangiocarcinoma, and GNS561 represents a strong second-line therapeutic candidate and hope for patients.

The company is expected to begin a Phase 2 in Q4 2022 with subject dosing expected in Q1 2023.

Cholangiocarcinoma is a rare malignant liver tumor with high mortality and limited treatment options. It mainly occurs in people over the age of 50.

The FDA is granting orphan designation to promote the development of a drug that is expected to have significant therapeutic advantage over existing treatments targeting a disease affecting 200,000 or fewer US patients each year.

Price Action: GENFIT shares are trading up around 11% at $4.90 on Tuesday during the after-market session.

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Akero Metabolic Disorders Biotech Wins Key Clinical Trial in NASH Liver Disease https://rogalevich.org/akero-metabolic-disorders-biotech-wins-key-clinical-trial-in-nash-liver-disease/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 17:26:21 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/akero-metabolic-disorders-biotech-wins-key-clinical-trial-in-nash-liver-disease/ The history of drug research in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a liver disease, is littered with clinical trial failures, but Akero Therapeutics is now announcing a Phase 2 Victory. Basically, the success of the clinical trial was determined using a new methodology that the FDA requires NASH drug developers to meet before seeking drug approval. According […]]]>

The history of drug research in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a liver disease, is littered with clinical trial failures, but Akero Therapeutics is now announcing a Phase 2 Victory. Basically, the success of the clinical trial was determined using a new methodology that the FDA requires NASH drug developers to meet before seeking drug approval.

According to preliminary results released Tuesday, the Akero drug efruxifermin led to at least one step improvement in a measure of fibrosis, or liver scarring, that develops from fatty liver disease. This result, as well as no worsening of the disease at week 24 of the study, was achieved by 41% of people in the high dose group and 39% of those who received the low dose. By comparison, 20% of people in the placebo group achieved the study endpoint.

South San Francisco-based Akero also reported success against a secondary goal of resolving NASH without worsening fibrosis. At the high dose, 76% of patients achieved this score; 47% of those who received the low dose achieved this goal. Only 5% of people in the placebo group met this secondary endpoint. Shares of Akero opened Tuesday at $28.04 apiece, up more than 128% from Monday’s closing price.

NASH is an advanced form of liver disease characterized by an accumulation of fat in the organ which leads to inflammation and fibrosis. Risk factors associated with the development of NASH include obesity and high cholesterol. There are no FDA-approved medications for NASH, which is primarily treated through dietary adjustments and other lifestyle changes. At the most advanced stage of the disease, the only treatment is a liver transplant.

Efruxifermin is a fusion protein designed to act as an analogue of fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21), a hormone that protects against cellular stress and regulates the metabolism of fats, carbohydrates and proteins. Akero licensed the drug from Amgen in 2018. Preliminary data released on Tuesday comes from a phase 2b trial involving 128 adults whose biopsy-confirmed NASH reached fibrosis stage 2 or 3 (there are four stages , stage 4 – cirrhosis – being the most severe). These participants were randomly assigned to receive either a high or low dose of the injectable drug Akero once a week, or a placebo, for 24 weeks.

The effectiveness of Akero’s drug was assessed by liver biopsies that were scored independently by two pathologists, with a third pathologist available to step in if the first two failed to reach consensus. The FDA now requires this consensus liver biopsy analysis for NASH drugs. When the FDA rejected Intercept Pharmaceuticals’ NASH competitor, obeticholic acid, in 2020, the agency requested a data analysis performed under this “consensus reading methodology.” Intercept reported the results of such an analysis in July, which the company says should support the resubmission of its new drug application. The Phase 3 failure of Genfit’s NASH drug led the Paris-based company to abandon the search for a treatment for this disease in favor of a rarer liver disorder. Last year, Genfit sold the rights to this drug, elafibranor, to Ipsen.

To pass Phase 3, the FDA requires that a NASH drug achieve one of two goals: improvement of fibrosis by one or more stages without worsening of disease symptoms, or resolution of NASH without worsening of fibrosis. The European Medicines Agency requires both of these objectives to be met to support the marketing authorization of a NASH drug.

While preliminary results for Akero’s NASH drug show better results for the high dose compared to the low dose, this benefit does not hold when measuring improvement in fibrosis by two or more stages. Biotechnology reports in a investor presentation that 16% of patients given the low dose showed such improvement, a benchmark achieved by 15% of patients in the high dose group. In comparison, 5% of patients in the placebo group showed an improvement in fibrosis of two or more stages.

The drug Akero was well tolerated by patients. The most commonly reported adverse events in the study included diarrhea, nausea, increased appetite, and frequent bowel movements. One serious drug-related adverse event, inflammation of the esophagus, was reported in one patient in the high dose group. Akero said this patient had a history of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

“We think the data is very compelling and shows [efruxifermin’s] potential to address the critical, global unmet need of patients by intervening at all stages of disease progression, potentially addressing both early-stage metabolic drivers and inflammation and fibrosis at a later stage,” Andrew Cheng, Chairman and CEO of Akero, said in a prepared statement. .

A separate Phase 2b trial of the drug Akero is underway in NASH patients who have achieved compensated cirrhosis, Child-Pugh Class A, which is the least severe classification of the most advanced stage of NASH. Akero said it expects to report the results of this mid-term study in the second half of next year. This study also expanded to include treating patients on the drug Akero with a type of diabetes medicine called a GLP-1 agonist. Results for this group are expected in the first half of 2023.

Public domain image by Flickr user NIH Image Gallery

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Growing Burden of Metabolism-Associated Fatty Liver Disease https://rogalevich.org/growing-burden-of-metabolism-associated-fatty-liver-disease/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 14:20:53 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/growing-burden-of-metabolism-associated-fatty-liver-disease/ It always seemed odd to be diagnosed with both alcoholic liver disease and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in the same person. When cirrhosis is diagnosed in a person who drinks six schooners of beer a day and has both type 2 diabetes and class 2 obesity, how should we describe the underlying cause? “Metabolic […]]]>

It always seemed odd to be diagnosed with both alcoholic liver disease and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in the same person. When cirrhosis is diagnosed in a person who drinks six schooners of beer a day and has both type 2 diabetes and class 2 obesity, how should we describe the underlying cause?

“Metabolic (Dysfunction) Associated Fatty Liver Disease (MAFLD)” is the new nomenclature proposed by an international consensus expert group led by Australian researchers in 2020. Because the term NAFLD implies a diagnosis of exclusion, it is difficult to fully characterize liver disease in patients with metabolic risk factors who also have another cause of liver injury, such as harmful consumption of alcohol, chronic viral hepatitis or autoimmune liver disease. Additionally, the term NAFLD implies a milder form of liver disease than that caused by alcohol and has been associated with the stigma of people with alcohol-related liver disease.

With increased knowledge of its pathogenesis, MAFLD is a term that recognizes a distinct clinical entity that is diagnosed on its own merits, independent of other liver diseases. This represents a paradigm shift in how clinicians now approach disease.

MAFLD is the hepatic manifestation of excessive lipid accumulation due to underlying metabolic dysregulation and is often associated with obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, type 2 diabetes mellitus and insulin resistance . A positive diagnosis of MAFLD can now be easily made in people with signs of fatty liver disease in the setting of overweight/obesity or type 2 diabetes. It can also occur in lean or healthy weight people with at least two metabolic risk factors. Notably, MAFLD can be diagnosed independently of alcohol consumption or concurrent liver disease.

MAFLD is the most common cause of chronic liver disease worldwide and is estimated to affect a quarter of the world’s population. The the incidence of MAFLD has increased in Australia over the past three decades and is associated with increased liver-related morbidity and mortality. There are few data regarding the prevalence of MAFLD in Australia, but two recent population-based studies reported a prevalence of 37–47% (here and here). Metabolic dysregulation leading to MAFLD is associated with multiple chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease (the most common cause of death in people with MAFLD), chronic kidney disease and extrahepatic cancers. The increase in prevalence is alarming, given that MAFLD now represents one of the most common indications for liver transplantation in many countries, including Australia and New Zealand. MAFLD-related liver cancer is also on the rise and is expected to increase by 75% by 2030.

In short, MAFLD is evolving into a major public health challenge, with its high prevalence, its links to other chronic diseases, and its risk of progressive liver injury and liver cancer.

MAFLD encompasses a continuum of disease from simple fatty liver disease (steatosis) to steatohepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis. Thus, the clinical presentation can vary widely from abnormal ultrasound with fatty infiltration, mild asymptomatic elevations of liver enzymes, to diagnosis at the time of complications from cirrhosis or liver cancer. It is a tragedy to be diagnosed with advanced liver cancer in a person who had had clear risk factors and signs of liver disease for many years, but was never fully evaluated or offered treatment, follow-up or monitoring.

It is therefore imperative that patients with MAFLD are identified early in multiple clinical settings, including general practice and in diabetes and obesity wards, so that significant fibrosis can be identified and strategies implemented to prevent the progression of fibrosis and screen for complications.

A patient with severe obesity or type 2 diabetes has a 70% chance of having fatty liver disease (here, here and here). When both are present, more than 90% of people will have MAFLD. Therefore, in the setting of significant metabolic dysfunction, MAFLD is likely to be present, and abnormal liver enzymes or liver ultrasound can be taken as confirmation. In all patients with abnormal liver enzymes, contributory causes of liver disease, including chronic viral hepatitis and harmful alcohol use, should be excluded.

The stage of hepatic fibrosis is the most important determinant of liver-related morbidity and mortality and, therefore, all patients with a diagnosis of MAFLD or with the main risk factors for MAFLD (obesity and type 2 diabetes) should be evaluated for the severity of fibrosis.

An initial evaluation can be easily performed using readily available blood tests to rule out significant fibrosis. Using the patient’s age, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and platelet count, a fibrosis index-4 (FIB-4) can be determined using a online calculator or smartphone app. A FIB-4 score ≤ 1.3 excludes advanced fibrosis. These patients are at risk for non-hepatic complications of metabolic dysfunction, which should be the focus of management, and do not require specialized liver assessment. A FIB-4 score ≥ 2.67 suggests advanced fibrosis, and these patients should be referred to a liver clinic or specialist. Patients with an indeterminate score require further evaluation with transient elastography (FibroScan [Echosens]). Although it is the best validated test in this setting, transient elastography is not widely available outside of liver clinics. If not available, shear wave elastography available on many ultrasound devices can be helpful in second line assessment.

When imaging-based assessment is not available, proprietary serum panels of fibrosis markers such as the enhanced liver fibrosis (ELF) test or hepascore can effectively rule out advanced fibrosis (here and here). Unfortunately, these blood panels are currently not funded under the Medical Benefits Schedule. Commonwealth funding of these surveys would allow for accurate risk stratification in a much larger number of people at risk of advanced fibrosis and cirrhosis in remote areas and areas of Australia. Referral to specialized liver services is advised for patients with indeterminate or advanced fibrosis or cirrhosis, or when concurrent liver disorders or liver cancer are suspected.

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fastest growing cause of cancer death in Australia. It also has one of the lowest survival rates, with only 22% of patients surviving 5 years.. Early diagnosis through monitoring using biannual ultrasound and serum α-fetoprotein (AFP) levels has a significant impact on the chances of accessing curative therapies and improving survival. Previously, more than 80% of HCCs occurred in patients with chronic viral hepatitis; however, with the widespread availability of effective treatments for hepatitis C and hepatitis B, the proportion of HCC associated with MAFLD is increasing. Patients with cirrhosis are most at risk of developing HCC and monitoring is strongly recommended.

However, 37% of HCCs associated with MAFLD occur in the absence of cirrhosis, posing a significant public health challenge given the large number of patients living with MAFLD in Australia. There are currently no guidelines recommending monitoring for HCC in patients with MAFLD who do not have cirrhosis. Unfortunately, when patients without cirrhosis develop HCC, it is too often a late presentation with no curative treatment options.

With the growing burden of MAFLD, GPs have a crucial role in long-term management to prevent complications. As there are no approved drug therapies specifically for MAFLD, the cornerstone of therapy remains lifestyle intervention, including diet modification. Weight loss can lead to a reduction in liver fat content, resolution of steatohepatitis, and regression of fibrosis. These benefits are typically seen with at least 7-10% weight loss. A low-fat, low-carbohydrate, or Mediterranean-style diet is recommended, along with regular moderate to vigorous exercise, smoking cessation, and the reduction or avoidance of alcohol consumption. Adjunctive pharmacotherapy for weight loss should be considered.

As in other metabolic disorders, dietary interventions are particularly challenging due to the ease of access and affordability of energy-dense and ultra-processed foods and beverages, and the rising prices of fresh foods. . Along with dietary intervention, aggressive management of cardiometabolic risk factors such as diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension is essential.

Currently, there is no consensus on the optimal strategy for the long-term follow-up of MAFLD patients. Since the progression of fibrosis in MAFLD alone is slow, it was suggested that MAFLD patients without fibrosis can be followed with noninvasive scores such as FIB-4 at 2-3 year intervals in the absence of worsening metabolic risk factors. Patients with advanced fibrosis or double liver disease should be monitored annually and referred for hepatology advice. People with cirrhosis should be monitored biannually for liver cancer and should be evaluated for other complications, including esophageal varices and hepatic decompensation.

The prevalence of MAFLD is increasing, leading to immense health and economic consequences. Prevention policy, community engagement and health care delivery focused on the underlying risk factors and growing burden of MAFLD and its complications will be paramount in managing the MAFLD epidemic.

Dr Rachael Jacob is a Fellow in Hepatology at the AW Morrow Gastroenterology and Liver Centre, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital.

Associate Professor Simone Strasser is Senior Personnel Specialist at the AW Morrow Gastroenterology and Liver Centre, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital and Director of the Liver Foundation.

Statements or opinions expressed in this article reflect the views of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official policy of WADA, the MJA Where Preview+ unless otherwise stated.

Subscribe for free Preview+ weekly newsletter here. It is accessible to all readers, not just licensed physicians.

If you would like to submit an article for consideration, send a Word version to mjainsight-editor@ampco.com.au.

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UT Southwest geneticists identify novel mechanism for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease without obesity: Newsroom https://rogalevich.org/ut-southwest-geneticists-identify-novel-mechanism-for-non-alcoholic-fatty-liver-disease-without-obesity-newsroom/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 20:01:24 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/ut-southwest-geneticists-identify-novel-mechanism-for-non-alcoholic-fatty-liver-disease-without-obesity-newsroom/ Zhao Zhang, Ph.D. DALLAS – September 07, 2022 – Using a genetic screening platform developed by a UT Southwestern Nobel Laureate, scientists from the Center for the Genetics of Host Defense at UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified genetic mutations that contribute to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)providing a potential future target for therapeutic interventions. […]]]>




Zhao Zhang, Ph.D.

DALLAS – September 07, 2022 – Using a genetic screening platform developed by a UT Southwestern Nobel Laureate, scientists from the Center for the Genetics of Host Defense at UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified genetic mutations that contribute to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)providing a potential future target for therapeutic interventions.

While obesity and diabetes are well-known risk factors for fatty liver disease, researchers at UT Southwestern were able to identify a new cause of fatty liver disease in the absence of obesity – a reduced level of the gene predicted 4951 (gm4951), which in turn leads to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. There are currently no approved drugs or treatments for this disease, which is rapidly becoming a major cause of chronic liver disease in the United States. Identifying the role of this gene in disease development provides an important new direction for those studying the disease to find potential treatments.

Bruce Beutler, Ph.D.

“We have identified a rare non-obese mouse model of NAFLD caused by GM4951 deficiency. This study lays the groundwork for the future development of approaches to activate the gm4951 counterpart to combat NAFLD,” said the lead author Zhao Zhang, Ph.D., Assistant Professor in the Center for Host Defense Genetics and the Division of Internal Medicine Endocrinology. The findings appear in Nature Communication.

The Host Defense Genetics Center is led by Bruce Beutler, Ph.D., Professor Regental and one of four Nobel Laureates at UT Southwestern. Dr. Beutler was awarded the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for discovering an important family of receptors that allow mammals to detect infections when they arise, triggering a powerful inflammatory response. Dr. Beutler has also developed the largest mouse mutagenesis program in the world, as well as an advanced genetic screening platform that allows Center researchers to screen for more than half of all genes in the mouse genome. In addition to a means of instantly identifying the mutations responsible for quantitative and qualitative phenotypes, the program enables the rapid discovery of many new components of the immune system.

“This study identified a potential human homolog of mouse GM4951 and the interaction of GM4951 with another human NAFLD/NASH-associated protein HSD17B13, suggesting that the finding is likely conserved in humans,” said Dr. Zhang. , whose laboratory is trying to understand the molecular mechanism. metabolic diseases, with the underlying aim of translating this knowledge into new therapeutic strategies.

The current study is based on the Advanced Genetic Screening Platform, which allowed researchers to identify two semi-dominant allelic missense mutations (oily and carboniferous) of gm4951 and define a critical role for GTPase-mediated translocation in hepatic lipid metabolism. Among their findings, the researchers found that loss of GM4951 causes NAFLD without obesity, GM4951 promotes lipid oxidation to prevent lipid accumulation in the liver, and GM4951 functions as a GTPase to translocate HSD17B13 into lipid droplets.

GM4951 is a poorly characterized protein, and this study defined GM4951’s role as a GTPase involved in lipid oxidation, Dr. Zhang said. GM4951-deficient mice developed nonalcoholic fatty liver disease on a high-fat diet with no changes in body weight or glucose metabolism, the researchers noted.

The research is supported by NIH grants R00DK115766 and R01DK130959 to Dr. Zhang; NIH grants R01AI125581 and U19AI100627 to Dr. Beutler; funding from the Lyda Hill Foundation to Dr. Beutler, and in part through a sponsored research agreement from Pfizer, Inc. to Dr. Beutler.

An estimated one-quarter of adults in the United States have non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), excess fat in liver cells that can cause chronic inflammation and liver damage, increasing the risk of liver cancer, d liver failure and requiring a transplant. NAFLD has become the most common cause of liver disease worldwide. Over the past few decades, it has been suggested that changes in lifestyles clearly drive the risk of NAFLD prevalence. However, liver fat content varies significantly between individuals with equivalent adiposity, indicating that genetic factors contribute to the development of NAFLD. Dr. Zhang’s lab is studying more than 20 genes in which mutations affect liver triglycerides without changes in body weight to identify new mechanisms of NAFLD.

UT Southwestern has several lines of research into the unknown causes of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease as well as potential treatments. Among them:

  • A groundbreaking 2008 study by Drs. Helen Hobbs and Jonathan Cohen, who run a joint lab at the Eugene McDermott Center for Human Growth and Development, came from the Dallas Heart Study and discovered a genetic basis for the risk of developing NAFLD. The study found that a variation in the PNPLA3 gene may make people more likely to develop fatty liver disease and progress to NAFLD, and while the troublesome gene variant is rare among African Americans, nearly half of Hispanics have it. The results reflected and helped explain clinically observed differences in NAFLD between these two groups. In 2017, the two reported how obesity significantly amplifies the effects of three genetic variants that increase the risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease through different metabolic pathways.
  • Investigations by Dr. Jay Horton, director of the Center for Human Nutrition at UT Southwestern, showed that removing a protein known as Scap reduced fat production and prevented fatty liver disease in mice despite obesity, high fat diets and hyperglycemia. This happened, Dr. Horton reported, because without Scap, the mice could not make the SREBPs involved in lipid manufacturing and storage. He later reported that liver fat can be reduced in humans with fatty liver disease by inhibiting two enzymes involved in the manufacture of fatty acids – acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 and 2. Although this inhibition is associated with a increased levels of triglycerides in the blood, there are ways to prevent or treat this condition.
  • UT Southwestern researchers in the division of liver and digestive diseases have been involved in clinical trials evaluating potential pharmaceuticals like Emricasan, an anti-inflammatory drug with fast-track FDA designation for the treatment of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis cirrhosis. TARGET-NASH is a longitudinal observational cohort study of patients cared for for NASH and related conditions across the NAFLD spectrum in routine clinical practice. TARGET-NASH is a research registry of patients with NAFL or NASH in real-life academic and community-based practice settings to assess the safety and effectiveness of current and future therapies.
  • Scientists at UT Southwestern’s Division of Digestive and Liver Diseases and UT Southwestern’s Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center recently developed a simple blood test to predict which NAFLD patients are most likely to develop a liver cancer. Studies have shown that people with NAFLD have an up to 17 times higher risk of liver cancer. For NAFLD patients considered most at risk for cancer, doctors recommend a demanding screening program involving liver ultrasound every six months. But identifying patients who belong to this group is difficult and usually involves invasive biopsies.

About UT Southwestern Medical Center

UT Southwestern, one of the nation’s leading academic medical centers, integrates pioneering biomedical research with exceptional clinical care and education. The institution’s faculty has received six Nobel Prizes and includes 26 members of the National Academy of Sciences, 17 members of the National Academy of Medicine, and 14 researchers from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Full-time faculty of more than 2,900 are responsible for groundbreaking medical advances and committed to rapidly translating scientific research into new clinical treatments. UT Southwestern physicians provide care in more than 80 specialties to more than 100,000 inpatients, more than 360,000 emergency room cases, and oversee nearly 4 million outpatient visits annually.



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Global Liver Disease Treatment Market Report 2022-2027: Rising Incidence of Liver Disease and Rising Government and Non-Government Awareness Programs Driving Growth – ResearchAndMarkets.com https://rogalevich.org/global-liver-disease-treatment-market-report-2022-2027-rising-incidence-of-liver-disease-and-rising-government-and-non-government-awareness-programs-driving-growth-researchandmarkets-com/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 09:09:00 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/global-liver-disease-treatment-market-report-2022-2027-rising-incidence-of-liver-disease-and-rising-government-and-non-government-awareness-programs-driving-growth-researchandmarkets-com/ DUBLIN–(BUSINESS WIRE)–The “Global Liver Disease Treatment Market (2022-2027) by Disease, Treatment, Geography, Competitive Analysis and Impact of Covid-19 with Ansoff Analysis” report has been added to from ResearchAndMarkets.com offer. Global Liver Disease Treatment Market is estimated to be valued at USD 177.12 Million in 2022 and is projected to reach USD 317.76 Million by 2027, […]]]>

DUBLIN–(BUSINESS WIRE)–The “Global Liver Disease Treatment Market (2022-2027) by Disease, Treatment, Geography, Competitive Analysis and Impact of Covid-19 with Ansoff Analysis” report has been added to from ResearchAndMarkets.com offer.

Global Liver Disease Treatment Market is estimated to be valued at USD 177.12 Million in 2022 and is projected to reach USD 317.76 Million by 2027, growing at a CAGR of 12.4%.

Market dynamics

Market dynamics are forces that are impacting pricing and stakeholder behaviors in the global Liver Disease Treatment market. These forces create price signals that result from changes in the supply and demand curves for a given product or service. The forces of market dynamics can be related to macro-economic and micro-economic factors. There are dynamic market forces other than price, demand and supply. Human emotions can also drive decisions, influence the market and create price signals. As market dynamics impact supply and demand curves, policymakers aim to determine how best to use various financial tools to stem various strategies aimed at accelerating growth and reducing risk.

Market segmentation

The global liver disease treatment market is segmented on the basis of disease, treatment, and geography.

  • By disease, the market is categorized into hepatitis, autoimmune diseases, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), cancer, genetic disorders, and others.

  • By treatment, the market is categorized into antiviral drugs, immunosuppressants, vaccines, immunoglobulins, corticosteroids, targeted therapy, and chemotherapy.

  • By geography, the market is categorized into Americas, Europe, Middle East & Africa, and Asia-Pacific.

Countries studied

  • America (Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Peru, United States, Rest of Americas)

  • Europe (Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Russia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom, Rest of Europe)

  • Middle East and Africa (Egypt, Israel, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, United Arab Emirates, Rest of MEA)

  • Asia-Pacific (Australia, Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Taiwan, Rest of Asia-Pacific)

Competitive Quadrant

The report includes Competitive Quadrant, a proprietary tool to analyze and assess the position of companies based on their industry position score and market performance score. The tool uses various factors to classify players into four categories. Some of these factors considered for analysis are financial performance over the past 3 years, growth strategies, innovation score, new product launches, investments, market share growth, etc

Ansoff analysis

The report presents a detailed analysis of the Ansoff matrix for the global liver disease treatment market. Ansoff Matrix, also known as Product/Market Expansion Grid, is a strategic tool used to design business growth strategies. The matrix can be used to assess approaches in four strategies viz. Market development, market penetration, product development and diversification. The matrix is ​​also used for risk analysis to understand the risk associated with each approach. The analyst analyzes the use of the Ansoff Matrix to provide the best approaches a company can take to improve its market position. Based on the SWOT analysis conducted on the industry and industry players, the analyst has designed appropriate strategies for market growth.

Why buy this report?

  • The report offers a comprehensive assessment of the global liver disease treatment market. The report includes in-depth qualitative analysis, verifiable data from authentic sources, and market size projections. Projections are calculated using proven research methodologies.

  • The report has been compiled through extensive primary and secondary research. The main research is done through interviews, surveys and observations of renowned personnel in the industry.

  • The report includes in-depth market analysis using Porter’s 5 forces model and Ansoff’s matrix. Additionally, the impact of Covid-19 on the market is also presented in the report.

  • The report also includes the regulatory scenario in the industry, which will help you to make an informed decision. The report discusses the major regulatory bodies and major rules and regulations imposed on this industry across various geographies.

  • The report also contains competitive analysis using Positioning Quadrants, the analyst’s proprietary competitive positioning tool.

Market dynamics

Drivers

  • Increased incidence of liver disease

  • Increase in the geriatric population

  • Increased governmental and non-governmental awareness programs

Constraints

  • Strict regulatory approvals related to drugs and vaccines for the treatment of liver disease

  • Resistance to antiviral drugs used in the treatment of hepatitis B and hepatitis C

Opportunities

  • Presence of solid pipeline products

  • Challenges

  • Risks of long-term health side effects

Main topics covered:

1 Description of the report

2 Research methodology

3 Executive summary

4 Market dynamics

5 Market Analysis

6 Global Liver Disease Treatment Market, By Disease

7 Global Liver Disease Treatment Market, By Treatment

8 Americas Liver Disease Treatment Market

9 Europe Liver Disease Treatment Market

10 Middle East & Africa Liver Disease Treatment Market

11 APAC Liver Disease Treatment Market

12 Competitive landscape

13 company profiles

14 Appendix

Companies cited

  • Abbott Laboratories

  • AbbVie

  • Astellas Pharmaceuticals

  • Bristol-Myers Squibb Company

  • Eli Lilly and company

  • Emerging BioSolutions

  • F. Hoffmann-La Roche

  • Gilead Sciences

  • GlaxoSmithKline

  • Merck & Co.

  • Novartis

  • Pfizer

  • Sanofi

  • Pharmaceutical Takeda

  • Viatris

For more information on this report, visit https://www.researchandmarkets.com/r/q524us

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Doctors are seeing more women and patients under 40 with liver disease | Local News https://rogalevich.org/doctors-are-seeing-more-women-and-patients-under-40-with-liver-disease-local-news/ Mon, 05 Sep 2022 10:45:00 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/doctors-are-seeing-more-women-and-patients-under-40-with-liver-disease-local-news/ When Dr. Rita German sees a patient walk through the doors of her multidisciplinary alcoholic liver disease clinic at UW-Madison, she has two thoughts. First, she hopes the patient won’t need a liver transplant. Then she wonders what could have happened differently. What could have prevented the patient from coming to see her in the […]]]>

When Dr. Rita German sees a patient walk through the doors of her multidisciplinary alcoholic liver disease clinic at UW-Madison, she has two thoughts.

First, she hopes the patient won’t need a liver transplant. Then she wonders what could have happened differently. What could have prevented the patient from coming to see her in the first place?






Dr. Rita German says more emphasis should be placed on preventing the root causes of liver disease. “There are all these points where we could have intervened before they came to me.”


AMBER ARNOLD, STATE NEWSPAPER


Life expectancy drops by 1.6 years in Wisconsin; doctors order screenings

“We are really good at treating liver disease. We’re not good at getting patients treated for their alcohol disorder,” she said. “There are all these points where we could have intervened before they came to see me. We did them a disservice.”

And those windows to intervene are getting smaller. Increasingly, German said, the patients she sees are in their 20s, 30s and 40s.

“It used to be a disease of the 50s or 60s,” said Dr. Eric Siegal, who directs the intensive care unit at Aurora St. Luke’s Hospital in Milwaukee.

People also read…

More women are being diagnosed with the disease, German said.

In south-central Wisconsin – Dane and its surrounding counties – 55 people died of liver disease in 2009, 35 of them from alcoholic liver disease. This made it the 14th leading cause of death in the region. Sixteen, or 30%, were women.

In 2020, 132 people died from liver disease, including 87 from alcoholic liver disease. Fifty-six, or 42%, were women. It now ranks as the eighth leading cause of death in the state.

During the same period, deaths from other chronic liver diseases, such as nonalcoholic chronic liver disease, also increased, said Dr. Veronica Loy, medical director of the liver transplant program at the Medical College of Wisconsin. . In 2009, 20 people died from the disease, which is often associated with high cholesterol, diabetes and obesity, according to Loy. In 2020, 45 died.

By nearly every available measure, deaths from liver disease — a catch-all term for any condition that damages the liver — are on the rise in south-central Wisconsin. Deaths from alcoholic liver disease, the buildup of fat in the liver that progresses to permanent damage with excessive alcohol consumption, have particularly increased.

In the early stages, mild liver disease is “very reversible,” Loy said.

But it can progress to cirrhosis, the replacement of regular healthy liver tissue with scar tissue, leading to jaundice, fluid buildup in the legs and abdomen, bruising, and liver cancer. In the most serious cases, liver failure will lead to death without a transplant.

In other cases, alcoholic hepatitis — liver damage from excessive alcohol consumption over a short period of time — can cause the same results, Loy said. Without a transplant, alcoholic hepatitis can prove fatal within six months, she said.

From 2007 to 2021, Dane County grew from 613 emergency room visits for chronic alcohol at 3,134 per year, not including hospitalizations for alcohol poisoning.

In 2021, UW Health reported seeing liver disease rates “skyrocket among men and women ages 25 to 34… especially young women.

But 2021 was the “tip of the iceberg” for the impacts of COVID-19 on alcohol consumption, German said. Mortality rates have also increased in younger patients, she said.

“When you see people who have their whole lives ahead of them and who see a liver transplant as the only thing left to save their life, it’s quite shocking,” Siegal said.

Siegal said he now sees young people in need of transplants at least every month. He spoke to parents his own age – Siegal is 55 – watching their own children die of liver disease.

Patients, especially young people, are often shocked when they hear they need a liver transplant, German said. But the 30s and 40s no longer surprise her, they come so often.

Liver transplants go to patients most in need first in south-central and southeastern Wisconsin, based on their Model Score for End-Stage Liver Disease, which determines how well a patient has need a transplant. In 2020, Wisconsin patients underwent 188 liver transplants, the most recorded in state history, according to the federal Department of Health and Human Services. Last year, 150 transplants took place. So far this year, there have been 81.

The rising rate of disease further stretches the medical system and means there aren’t enough livers donated for patients, Loy and Siegal said.

“These incremental increases in the number of sick people are starting to bring us closer and closer to a breaking point,” Siegal said. “We are not there yet. But we are certainly stressed.

“Really quirky”

Wisconsin had problems with binge drinking long before the pandemic, said Maureen Busalacchi, director of the Wisconsin Alcohol Policy Project at the Medical College of Wisconsin.

“We are not close to the rest of the nation,” Busalacchi said. “We are really out of step”

German tells some patients that they can no longer drink without risking death. They sometimes grow back, she says.

“They’re like, ‘Well, what about football Sundays?'”

In 2018, Wisconsin reported a 25.8% prevalence of heavy drinking among adults, according to CDC data — the highest rate in the nation. And Wisconsin residents can buy liquor as early as 6 a.m., due to 2011 legislation.

And doctors have made another point: Women don’t metabolize alcohol at the same rate as men.

“A lot of women are drinking in ways that used to be considered a masculine way of drinking,” Loy said.

Women receive significantly less screening than men for alcohol use disorders, Loy said. When a doctor identifies the disorder, they are less likely to refer it for psychological help or alcohol management. And those who are referred go there less often due to responsibilities such as child care and a perceived stigma, Loy said.

“’Anecdotally, I can see that women are more bothered by this,’ German said.

Pandemic stress

Wisconsin’s drinking culture has only gotten worse during the pandemic, Loy said.

“The consequences of social isolation, working from home and social pressures have really caused people tremendous stress,” she said. A study she co-authored at the start of the pandemic reported that women with children unable to attend school or daycare, or those with a family history of heavy drinking, had the highest risk of drinking more.







Visual of death


Rockefeller Institute for Government


“We’ve definitely seen mothers who have had to deal with the brunt of child care… juggling jobs, staying home more,” German said. “This stress increased their alcohol consumption.”

What to change

To curb excessive alcohol consumption, Busalacchi highlighted a number of interventions detailed in the Wisconsin Alcohol Policy Project document. report on reducing binge drinking in Wisconsin: More liquor age compliance checks at retailers, training volunteers not to overserve customers at festivals, and “putting some checks in place” on who gets a liquor license.

The addition of a statewide “nightcap location” data collection program, which would identify bars and restaurants where those arrested for OWI and assault were served for the last time would reveal which establishments regularly overserve, she said.

“The vast majority of owners are doing a good job,” Busalacchi said. “And then there are a few that are way out there.”

Reforming Wisconsin’s beverage culture presents a challenge, Busalacchi said. But most people don’t want to worry about drunk attendees at events – and she’s also met law enforcement officials who believe that less alcohol consumption will lead to less crime, he said. she declared.

Critically, the public needs better alcohol education. German said: Some patients do not consider drinking beer and wine to be alcohol consumption.

“Patients underreport their alcohol use to physicians,” Shah said. “Whatever they say, we can multiply by 1.5 or 2.”

Early referral or diagnosis can be critical, Shah said. It emphasizes the importance of quitting smoking for the patient. And in the early stages of liver disease, abstaining from drinking can allow the liver to “regenerate completely and recover in 30 to 60 days,” Loy said.

At German’s new clinic, which has seen 50 patients from across the region since it opened last fall with an average age of 48, she refers patients to counseling, Alcoholics Anonymous, social workers and rehabilitation, among other tools – aimed at providing multidisciplinary treatment.

The healthcare system must intervene before patients begin self-medication for mental health issues, Siegal said.

“It’s going to take a huge campaign to get people to understand that responsible and appropriate drinking can be part of normal life,” Siegal said. “But we’ve gone too far for far too many people.”

“It was a disease of the 50s, 60s.”

Dr. Eric SiegalAurora St. Luke’s Hospital

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“We are not close to the rest of the nation. We are really out of step. »

Maureen BusalacchiDraft Wisconsin Alcohol Policy

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Rarely studied liver disease disparities in Europe, review finds https://rogalevich.org/rarely-studied-liver-disease-disparities-in-europe-review-finds/ Fri, 02 Sep 2022 15:27:47 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/rarely-studied-liver-disease-disparities-in-europe-review-finds/ A new analysis found that only 1 in 10 studies of liver cancer inequality had a European focus or origin. Despite the high prevalence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and other liver disorders in Europe, relatively little scientific research has focused on disparities in liver disease rates and outcomes among diverse […]]]>

A new analysis found that only 1 in 10 studies of liver cancer inequality had a European focus or origin.

Despite the high prevalence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and other liver disorders in Europe, relatively little scientific research has focused on disparities in liver disease rates and outcomes among diverse populations, according to a new report.

In an article in the Journal of Hepatology, correspondent Juan M. Pericàs, MD, PhD, MPH, of the Vall d’Hebron Research Institute, Spain, and his colleagues, argued that more attention needs to be paid to health care disparities in liver disease in Europe. They say better research could allow clinicians and academics to focus more on the social determinants underlying these disparities.

Pericàs and colleagues said inequality is an important topic in liver disease because social factors can impact both a person’s developing disease and their ability to access appropriate care. once she has the disease. For example, previous research has suggested that people with low levels of education or who come from socioeconomically disadvantaged areas have higher cirrhosis mortality rates. Research in the United States has also suggested that men with cirrhosis are more likely than women with cirrhosis to receive a liver transplant, and that 1-year survival after a liver transplant varies by racial and ethnic group. .

“The impact of inequality on liver disease is not direct, but rather the interaction of multiple factors that could act synergistically and have delayed and multi-layered effects on how liver disease is distributed among populations and how it affects some groups and individuals more severely than others,” the investigators wrote.

Yet most data regarding disparities in liver disease prevalence and outcomes are either based on studies of populations outside of Europe or have been conducted by institutions outside of Europe, found Pericàs and his colleagues.

They performed a literature search looking for articles examining health inequalities and disparities in liver disease that were published between 1966 and June 7, 2022. They initially identified 474 studies, but after excluding duplicates and out-of-scope studies, they ended up with a total of 303 studies.

Investigators reported a number of “striking” findings. They found no studies before the 2000s, and most of the studies they found were from the last 5 years. Most of the studies, they said, took a “reductionist approach” and only dealt with simple quantitative differences.

The geography of the search was also remarkable, said Pericàs and his colleagues. All but 16.1% of the studies were performed by institutions in the United States. Only 10.2% of the studies identified were conducted by European institutions or populations examined in Europe.

When the investigators analyzed the existing literature by disease category, they found that studies of liver transplants were the most common. However, most of these studies focused on the United States, and most focused on how rules and prioritization scores affected wait times and outcomes for different populations.

“In short, although many studies have investigated the frequency and impact of inequity on liver transplantation, this is probably the clearest example of a topic that has been widely discussed from the perspective of “disparities,” where the mechanisms of inequalities have often been overlooked,” they wrote.

The authors cited a number of potential reasons why inequalities in liver disease in Europe have not been thoroughly studied. They said it could be linked to the lack of courses and educational programs available in Europe that focus on health inequalities. Also, they said people might be unaware of potential disparities in access to healthcare since most European countries have universal healthcare schemes.

Pericàs and his colleagues said researchers and practitioners can stem the problem, but only if they take an active role. The solution will need to include more comprehensive data collection and analysis, as well as a commitment to interventions based on that data and those disparities.

“To achieve this goal, Europe should increase its awareness of liver health inequalities, conduct high-quality research, and guide and inspire health policymakers and society as a whole to close this gap. gap so that all of our communities are protected and effectively protected from liver disease,” they concluded.

Reference

Ventura-Cots M, Bataller R, Lazarus JV, Benach J, Pericas JM. Applying an equity lens to liver health and research in Europe. J Hepatol. Published online August 16, 2022. doi:10.1016/j.jhep.2022.07.021

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