Liver disease – Rogalevich http://rogalevich.org/ Sat, 27 Nov 2021 18:53:04 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://rogalevich.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.png Liver disease – Rogalevich http://rogalevich.org/ 32 32 ‘Best Treatment’ Weight Loss Surgery for Fatty Liver Disease https://rogalevich.org/best-treatment-weight-loss-surgery-for-fatty-liver-disease/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 17:08:15 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/best-treatment-weight-loss-surgery-for-fatty-liver-disease/ Bariatric surgery significantly reduces the risk of major adverse liver outcomes as well as major acute cardiovascular events (MACE) in patients with biopsy-proven non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), compared to similar patients who did not undergo biopsy. surgery, according to new research. “This is the first study in the medical field to report a treatment modality associated […]]]>

Bariatric surgery significantly reduces the risk of major adverse liver outcomes as well as major acute cardiovascular events (MACE) in patients with biopsy-proven non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), compared to similar patients who did not undergo biopsy. surgery, according to new research.

“This is the first study in the medical field to report a treatment modality associated with a decreased risk of major adverse events in patients with biopsy-proven NASH,” lead author Steven Nissen, MD, of Heart, Vascular and Thoracic Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Ohio, said in a hospital statement.

“The SPLENDOR study shows that in patients with obesity and NASH, substantial and lasting weight loss achieved through bariatric surgery can simultaneously protect the heart and decrease the risk of progression to end-stage liver disease “, he underlined.

The study was published online on November 11 in JAMA.

SPLENDEUR study

The SPLENDOR study (Surgical Procedures and Long-Term Effectiveness in NASH Disease and Obesity Risk) included 1158 patients with biopsy-proven NASH without cirrhosis; 650 underwent weight loss surgery and the remaining 508 served as controls. Participants had a median age of 49.8 years, a median body mass index (BMI) of 44.1 kg / m2, and almost 64% were women.

Bariatric procedures included Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery, performed in 83% of patients, and sleeve gastrectomy, performed in the remaining 17%.

“The predefined primary endpoints were the incidence of major hepatic adverse reactions and MACE,” notes lead author Ali Aminian, MD, director, Bariatric & Metabolic Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Ohio. Major hepatic adverse events included progression to clinical or histologic cirrhosis, development of liver cancer, need for liver transplantation, or liver-related death.

MACE was a composite of coronary events, cerebrovascular events, heart failure, or cardiovascular death.

At a median follow-up of 7 years, five patients in the bariatric surgery group versus 40 patients in the non-surgical controls had presented a major adverse hepatic event.

At 10 years, the cumulative incidence of major hepatic adverse reactions was 88% lower in the bariatric surgery group, occurring in 2.3% of the surgical group, compared to 9.6% in the non-surgical group (hazard ratio [HR], 0.12; P = .01), report the investigators.

At the end of the study, 39 patients in the surgical group had undergone MACE compared to 60 patients in the control group. After 10 years, the cumulative incidence of MACE was 70% lower in the bariatric surgery group, at 8.5%, compared to 15.7% in the control group (RR: 0.30; P = .007).

Also at age 10, bariatric surgery also reduced mean body weight by 22.4% in those who had undergone an operation versus weight loss, on average, by 4.6% in non-surgical controls (P <0.001), while in diabetic patients, bariatric surgery also resulted in a significant reduction in A1c.

However, the risk of major adverse events within 30 days of weight loss surgery was relatively high, at 9.5%, the authors note.

But in the first year after undergoing the procedure, only four patients (0.6%) had died from surgical complications, including two patients from a gastrointestinal leak.

The main treatment for NASH is weight loss

As the authors point out, obesity is the primary pathophysiological driver of NASH, and weight loss – regardless of how it is achieved – is currently the primary treatment for NASH.

“However, weight loss surgery is the most effective therapy available for obesity,” they point out.

Shanu Kothari, MD, president of the American Society for Metabolic & Bariatric Surgery, agrees, saying in a statement: “No treatment other than weight loss surgery has been shown to have such a significant effect on reducing the risk of ‘severe outcomes or death in patients with NASH. “

“Bariatric surgery should be considered a first-line treatment for these patients,” he said.

And as Aminian pointed out, there is currently no drug approved by the FDA for the treatment of fatty liver disease.

“The striking results of this study provide strong evidence that bariatric surgery should be considered an effective treatment option for patients with advanced fatty liver disease and obesity,” he added in the statement.

Aminian said he received research support and speaking fees from Medtronic. Nissen said he received research support from Medtronic and Ethicon.

JAMA. Published online November 11, 2021. Summary

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Causes of death in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), alcoholic liver disease, and chronic viral hepatitis B and C https://rogalevich.org/causes-of-death-in-patients-with-non-alcoholic-fatty-liver-disease-nafld-alcoholic-liver-disease-and-chronic-viral-hepatitis-b-and-c/ Sat, 20 Nov 2021 06:00:00 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/causes-of-death-in-patients-with-non-alcoholic-fatty-liver-disease-nafld-alcoholic-liver-disease-and-chronic-viral-hepatitis-b-and-c/ This article was originally published here Anne Hépatol. November 17, 2021: 10556. doi: 10.1016 / j.aohep.2021.100556. Online ahead of print. ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVES: The cause of death in patients with chronic liver disease (CHD) may differ depending on the underlying etiology of the liver disease. Our goal was to assess different causes of death […]]]>

This article was originally published here

Anne Hépatol. November 17, 2021: 10556. doi: 10.1016 / j.aohep.2021.100556. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVES: The cause of death in patients with chronic liver disease (CHD) may differ depending on the underlying etiology of the liver disease. Our goal was to assess different causes of death in patients with the most common types of CPM using a US national database.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: 2008 and 2018 death data from the National Vital Statistics System (NVSS) of the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) were used. The rank of cause of death for each etiology of CPM was assessed. The causes of death were classified according to ICD-10 codes. Liver-related deaths included liver cancer, cirrhosis, and CPD.

RESULTS: Of a total of 2,826,531 deaths in 2018, there were 85,807 (3.04%) with underlying CGD (mean age at death 63.0 years, 63.8% males, 70 , 8% white). Liver-related mortality was the leading cause of death for all types of CPM [45.8% in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), 53.0% in chronic hepatitis C (CHC), 57.8% in chronic hepatitis B (CHB), 81.8% in alcoholic liver disease (ALD)]. Next come cardiac deaths (NAFLD 10.3%, CHC 9.1%, CHB 4.6%, ALD 4.2%) and extrahepatic cancer (NAFLD 7.0%, CHC 11.9%, CHB 14.9%, ALD 2.1%). Although liver cancer is the leading cause of cancer death, lung, colorectal and pancreatic cancers were also common causes of cancer deaths.

CONCLUSIONS: Among the deceased patients with CPM, underlying liver disease was the leading cause of death. Among solid cancers, liver cancer was the leading cause of cancer-related death.

PMID: 34800721 ​​| DOI: 10.1016 / j.aohep.2021.100556


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Sure Signs You Have Liver Disease, Experts Say – Eat This, Not That https://rogalevich.org/sure-signs-you-have-liver-disease-experts-say-eat-this-not-that/ Wed, 17 Nov 2021 13:16:00 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/sure-signs-you-have-liver-disease-experts-say-eat-this-not-that/ The liver is one of our most essential organs. It helps regulate chemicals in our blood and flushes wastes out of our body. It performs vital functions and without a healthy liver we cannot survive. According to Cleveland Clinic, “About 30 million people have some form of liver disease. More than 8,000 people in the […]]]>

The liver is one of our most essential organs. It helps regulate chemicals in our blood and flushes wastes out of our body. It performs vital functions and without a healthy liver we cannot survive. According to Cleveland Clinic, “About 30 million people have some form of liver disease. More than 8,000 people in the United States received liver transplants in 2017, and more than 17,000 people are on the waiting list for one. liver transplant. ” Read the tips below to learn more about liver disease and signs to look out for, and to ensure your health and the health of others, don’t miss it. Sure Signs You Have Ever Had COVID.

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According to My Med, there are four stages of liver disease.

Step 1

“The first stage of liver disease involves inflammation of the individual’s bile ducts or liver. Abdominal pain is often the first symptoms of this inflammation when the person’s body tries to fight off the disease or infection.” , explains MyMed.

2nd step

“In a number of people with liver disease, the disease does not become evident until stage two or stage three, as the initial symptoms often go unnoticed. Stage two is scarring or inflammation (damage ) starting to block the natural flow of blood in the liver, ”explains MyMed.

Step 3

“Cirrhosis, pronounced” si-roh-sis, “is the result of the progression of liver disease, usually due to lack of treatment, in which scar tissue from the liver replaces healthy tissue. This process occurs when healthy liver cells have been damaged over time (normally several years) with an active disease or infection, ”MyMed explains.

Step 4

“During the final stage of the disease, liver failure will signal the end of liver function. This will require immediate medical attention in order to avoid death,” MyMed explains.

RELATED: Symptoms of COVID often appear in this order

Young woman with nausea in all denim clothes sitting on bed
Shutterstock / New Africa

According to Cleveland Clinic the following are symptoms of liver disease to watch out for.

  • Tired
  • Nausea
  • Loss of appetite
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting blood
  • Blood in stool

“As liver failure progresses, symptoms get worse. In later stages, symptoms of liver failure can include:

  • Jaundice (yellowing of the skin and eyes)
  • Extreme fatigue
  • Disorientation (confusion and uncertainty)
  • Fluid buildup in the abdomen and extremities (arms and legs)

Sometimes the liver suddenly fails, which is known as acute liver failure. People with acute liver failure may have the following symptoms: “

  • Bleeding
  • Changes in mental state
  • Musty smell or sugary breath
  • Movement problems
  • Loss of appetite
  • General feeling of unease
  • Jaundice

RELATED: Secret Tips for Staying Healthy After 60

Pour the whiskey drink into the glass
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There are several causes of liver disease depending on the Mayo Clinic, which include infections, immune system abnormalities, genetics, cancer, chronic alcohol abuse, and some prescription and over-the-counter drugs.

RELATED: If you have this in your blood, you are at risk for dementia.

Tattoo artist posing in a tattoo parlor.
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While some people will get liver disease from genetics, there are things that can increase your risk.

The Mayo Clinic lists the following factors that can

  • Excessive consumption of alcohol
  • Obesity
  • Type 2 diabetes
  • Tattoos or piercings
  • Injecting drugs using shared needles
  • Blood transfusion before 1992
  • Exposure to blood and body fluids of other people
  • Unprotected sex
  • Exposure to certain chemicals or toxins
  • Family history of liver disease

RELATED: This vitamin can stop dementia, new study finds

do not drink alcohol
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There are several ways to help prevent liver disease. The Mayo Clinic recommends the following:

  • Drink less alcohol
  • Avoiding unprotected sex
  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • Don’t share needles
  • Wash your hands thoroughly before preparing food and eating. And to get through this pandemic in better health, don’t miss these 35 places where you’re most likely to catch COVID.


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Weight Loss Surgery Reduces Risk of Severe Liver Disease in Obese People: Study | Health Info https://rogalevich.org/weight-loss-surgery-reduces-risk-of-severe-liver-disease-in-obese-people-study-health-info/ Fri, 12 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/weight-loss-surgery-reduces-risk-of-severe-liver-disease-in-obese-people-study-health-info/ By Robert Preidt and Robin Foster, Health Day reporter (Health day) FRIDAY, Nov 12, 2021 (HealthDay News) – Weight loss surgery has reduced the risk of severe liver disease or liver cancer in obese people with fatty liver disease, according to a new study. It included more than 1,100 patients with an aggressive type of […]]]>

By Robert Preidt and Robin Foster, Health Day reporter

(Health day)

FRIDAY, Nov 12, 2021 (HealthDay News) – Weight loss surgery has reduced the risk of severe liver disease or liver cancer in obese people with fatty liver disease, according to a new study.

It included more than 1,100 patients with an aggressive type of fatty liver disease. Patients who had weight loss (bariatric) surgery had an almost 90% reduced risk of advanced liver disease, liver cancer, or related death over the next decade, The New York Times reported.

These results were seen in just five of 650 patients who underwent weight loss surgery, compared with 40 of 508 patients who did not have the surgery, according to the study published Nov. 11 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Consistent with previous research, the study also found that patients who had weight loss surgery were also 70% less likely to have a cardiac event, stroke, heart failure, or death from heart disease.

“Obesity is the main driver of fatty liver disease – it all starts with obesity,” said study author Dr. Ali Aminian, director of the Bariatric and Metabolic Institute at the Cleveland Clinic. Times. “When we have excess fat building up in the liver, it causes fatty liver disease; then the inflammation comes on and gets worse, then scar tissue forms and leads to cirrhosis.”

“When a patient loses weight, the fat disappears from everywhere, including the liver; the inflammation goes away and some of the scar tissue can reverse and improve,” Aminian explained. “Weight loss is the main factor here.”

The results are remarkable, according to the study’s lead author Dr. Steven Nissen, academic director of the Heart and Vascular Institute at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio.

The liver risk after bariatric surgery “was the lowest I have seen in 30 years of studies, an 88% reduction in progression to advanced liver disease,” he told Times.

This was an observational study in which researchers looked at cases at the Cleveland Clinic over 12 years, so it does not prove that weight loss surgery directly reduces the risk of serious liver or heart disease.

However, this adds to the growing evidence that weight loss surgery may offer additional health benefits beyond weight loss, according to the Times. But the operation was not without risk: Sixty-two of 650 patients who underwent weight loss surgery in the study group developed serious complications after the operation, and four of them died in the year following the operation.

About 250,000 bariatric surgeries are performed each year in the United States, which has approximately 100 million critically obese adults.

THE SOURCE: The New York Times

Copyright © 2021 Health Day. All rights reserved.


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Newly discovered genetic link to non-alcoholic inflammatory liver disease – sciencedaily https://rogalevich.org/newly-discovered-genetic-link-to-non-alcoholic-inflammatory-liver-disease-sciencedaily/ Wed, 10 Nov 2021 05:37:30 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/newly-discovered-genetic-link-to-non-alcoholic-inflammatory-liver-disease-sciencedaily/ Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the accumulation of fat in the liver unrelated to alcohol abuse or other liver disease. It is often associated with obesity and diabetes and is considered a manifestation of metabolic syndrome. It progresses to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) with the onset of inflammation, although it is currently not known how […]]]>

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the accumulation of fat in the liver unrelated to alcohol abuse or other liver disease. It is often associated with obesity and diabetes and is considered a manifestation of metabolic syndrome. It progresses to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) with the onset of inflammation, although it is currently not known how this occurs. NASH can cause serious complications such as liver failure, cirrhosis, and liver cancer. Now, a team led by the University of Tsukuba has found that albino mice with a point mutation in the tyrosinase gene are more sensitive to NASH than mice carrying the unmutated gene.

The prevalence and severity of NAFLD are known to vary between different human ethnicities, with the highest prevalence observed in Hispanic populations. The tyrosinase gene codes for an enzyme involved in the production of melanin, affecting skin tone. The team observed in preliminary computer analyzes that different point mutations in the tyrosinase gene also vary in frequency between different ethnic groups, with the two main variants being seen at high frequencies in Hispanic populations. The researchers therefore speculated that variants of the tyrosinase gene could possibly affect the sensitivity and severity of NAFLD and NASH.

The team studied a particular mouse line known as “C57BL / 6” or B6, to test this hypothesis. Albino B6 mice exhibit a single change, known as a point mutation, in the tyrosinase gene. This affects the function of the enzyme tyrosinase so that albino mice cannot produce melanin properly, losing their pigmentation and turning white instead of black.

Dietary cholesterol contributes to the development of inflammation of the liver. So the team fed albino and black B6 mice a high cholesterol diet for 10 weeks. They found that the black B6 mice showed no symptoms throughout the diet, while about 50% of the albino B6 mice exhibited a severe phenotype, developing liver damage after just one day that progressed to NASH after 2 weeks. .

The team further showed that albino B6 mice exhibited elevated expression of tyrosinase in the small intestine. “This could affect the sensitivity of mice to NASH by affecting the absorption of cholesterol in the small intestine,” says assistant professor Michito Hamada, lead author, “indicating a potential mechanism for this increased sensitivity”.

“As the point mutation in the tyrosinase gene is the only genetic difference between albino B6 mice and black B6 mice,” explains Assistant Professor Hamada, “our work will facilitate the identification of genetic susceptibility factors for the development of NASH and will broaden the understanding of the pathophysiology of NASH. “

Source of the story:

Material provided by Tsukuba University. Note: Content can be changed for style and length.


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Maternal obesity increases the risk of fatty liver disease in children https://rogalevich.org/maternal-obesity-increases-the-risk-of-fatty-liver-disease-in-children/ Tue, 09 Nov 2021 22:27:26 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/maternal-obesity-increases-the-risk-of-fatty-liver-disease-in-children/ Maternal obesity and overweight were linked to a higher risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in their children. Children and young adults with advanced fibrosis or cirrhosis were also more likely to have had obese or overweight mothers during pregnancy, according to the results of a study published in the Journal of Hepatology. Resulting […]]]>

Maternal obesity and overweight were linked to a higher risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in their children. Children and young adults with advanced fibrosis or cirrhosis were also more likely to have had obese or overweight mothers during pregnancy, according to the results of a study published in the Journal of Hepatology.

Resulting from the accumulation of fat in the liver, NAFLD and its most severe form, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), are responsible for an increasing proportion of advanced liver disease worldwide. Due to inflammation, NAFLD can lead to buildup of scar tissue (fibrosis), cirrhosis (advanced scarring), and even liver cancer. In the absence of effective and approved medical therapies, disease management depends on lifestyle changes, such as weight loss and exercise.

Although maternal obesity leads to heart disease and diabetes in children, the link to NAFLD is unknown. Hannes Hagström, MD, PhD, of Karolinska University Hospital in Sweden, and colleagues used data from the national ESPRESSO cohort to identify people up to 25 years of age with a biopsy-verified diagnosis of NAFLD between 1992 and 2016. These 165 people were matched by age, sex, and calendar year to up to five control subjects without NAFLD. The researchers also linked data on maternal body mass index (BMI) in early pregnancy as well as confounding factors from the Swedish National Medical Birth Registry.

The researchers found that maternal BMI was linked to fatty liver disease in their children. That is, women who were overweight or obese during pregnancy were more likely to have children who would develop NAFLD. Additionally, children and young adults were at greater risk of developing fibrosis or cirrhosis if their mothers were overweight or obese. Some 19% of people with NAFLD had obese mothers during pregnancy, compared to 8% of those without NAFLD. Additionally, maternal obesity appeared to be an independent risk factor, since adjusting for socioeconomic and metabolic factors did not change the association.

“In this national, population-based case-control study, we demonstrate an increased risk of biopsy-proven NAFLD in infants born to mothers with a high BMI during early pregnancy,” the researchers wrote. “Mothers with a high BMI should receive active counseling on how to reduce the risk of NAFLD in their offspring. “

Click here to read the study in the Journal of Hepatology.

Click here to learn more about fatty liver disease.



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Epidemic liver disease in the regions https://rogalevich.org/epidemic-liver-disease-in-the-regions/ https://rogalevich.org/epidemic-liver-disease-in-the-regions/#respond Sun, 07 Nov 2021 11:11:02 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/epidemic-liver-disease-in-the-regions/ Live New figures suggest Australia is making its way into an epidemic of liver disease – with nearly half of the region’s people over 60 affected. The epidemic has been spreading quietly for at least 30 years – and yet the extent of the problem is not fully known. Alcohol is not the main driver. […]]]>

Live

New figures suggest Australia is making its way into an epidemic of liver disease – with nearly half of the region’s people over 60 affected.

The epidemic has been spreading quietly for at least 30 years – and yet the extent of the problem is not fully known.

Alcohol is not the main driver. Viral hepatitis either, fortunately on the decline.

Instead, “metabolic factors” – notably obesity and diabetes – are to blame.

In other words, Australia’s persistent unhealthy diet and lack of exercise is catching up with us in the form of non-alcoholic liver disease (NAFLD) – a condition that often goes undiagnosed and is l ‘one of the main causes of cirrhosis (scarring) and primary liver. Cancer.

New research lifts the veil

In a one-of-a-kind study, researchers in Melbourne looked at the prevalence of liver disease in a number of regional communities.

They found that at least 36% of regional Victorians live with NAFLD – with 45% of people over 60 affected.

The study involved more than 700 people from the Goulburn Valley.

The numbers were based on their position on the Fatty Liver Index, which uses pathology data combined with body mass index (BMI) and other measures.

These results suggest that we have seriously underestimated the prevalence of NAFLD, which is thought to have affected 20 to 30 percent of the population, or about 5.5 million Australians.

Professor Stuart Roberts, senior author and chief of hepatology and consultant gastroenterologist at Alfred Hospital, said: ”.

He said the study shows that rates in regional communities “are
cause for concern, and more research is needed to uncover the prevalence of the disease in metropolitan areas, which may be higher than current estimates ”.

Data from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare provides a clue.

Trend supported by independent research

In 2017-2018, 71% of people living in regional areas were overweight or obese, according to the AIHW.

This compares to 65 percent in major cities.

Last year, Professor Roberts co-authored an article that predicted that annual liver deaths from NAFLD could nearly double over the next decade, from 1,900 in 2019 to 3,500 deaths in 2030.

A total of 30,000 deaths from NAFLD are expected over the next 10 years. And they are pretty much all preventable.

The rising trends in obesity and diabetes in Australia have paralleled the emergence of liver cancer as the fastest growing cause of cancer-related deaths in the country for the past 30 years.

A 2013 article found that primary liver cancer was the only malignant tumor to show a significant increase in death rate between 1991 and 2010.

Excessive alcohol consumption and viral hepatitis have long been considered the two main contributors to primary liver cancer, but as the 2013 article observed, NAFLD was increasingly to blame.

A tipping point that could be avoided

NAFLD is the most common form of chronic liver disease caused by a buildup of fat in the liver of people who drink little or no alcohol.

It is largely asymptomatic, but some people will experience fatigue and experience pain or discomfort in the upper right abdomen.

Age, obesity, insulin resistance, and diabetes are risk factors, but it’s reversible with eating a healthy diet and exercising.

But few of us take this self-healing path.

Richard Wylie, CEO of the Liver Foundation, said: “In some ways we have become complacent about the trajectory of obesity-related diseases such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes, but fatty liver disease and its direct links to cirrhosis and liver cancer just might be the tipping point the community needs to start taking their overall lifestyle more seriously ”.

The new daily has reported a number of lifestyle and diet changes that may be helpful in avoiding or reversing NAFLD.

See here and here. Going for a regular walk is one of your best options.


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Scientists discover new therapeutic target to treat fatty liver disease https://rogalevich.org/scientists-discover-new-therapeutic-target-to-treat-fatty-liver-disease/ https://rogalevich.org/scientists-discover-new-therapeutic-target-to-treat-fatty-liver-disease/#respond Wed, 03 Nov 2021 14:29:50 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/scientists-discover-new-therapeutic-target-to-treat-fatty-liver-disease/ About 80 million Americans suffer from fatty liver disease unrelated to alcohol abuse. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is associated with obesity and diabetes, and can lead to more serious liver damage such as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), cirrhosis, and liver cancer. Cardiovascular disease, colorectal cancer, and breast cancer are actually the leading causes of death in […]]]>

About 80 million Americans suffer from fatty liver disease unrelated to alcohol abuse. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is associated with obesity and diabetes, and can lead to more serious liver damage such as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), cirrhosis, and liver cancer. Cardiovascular disease, colorectal cancer, and breast cancer are actually the leading causes of death in patients with fatty liver disease.

Several drugs in late stages of development have failed due to the complexity of the disease, poor efficacy or toxicity of the drugs. Although several clinical trials have been conducted over the past decades, there is currently no FDA approved pharmaceutical treatment for NASH.

To understand the complexity of the progression of fatty liver disease, a team of USC scientists explored the molecular mechanism in experimental NAFL / NASH. The project led to the discovery of a plausible therapeutic target gene, SH3BP5, also known as BSA.

“This discovery is the culmination of years of work by the team including USC bioinformatics specialists, pathologists, students, visiting researchers and collaborators,” said Sanda Win, MD, PhD, Assistant professor of medicine research in the GI / liver division of the department. of Medicine at USC’s Keck School of Medicine.

As Win explains, BSA is a protein in the outer membrane of mitochondria, known as the powerhouse of the cell. The biological function of BSA was not known until researchers at USC discovered it 10 years ago. BSA is a pivotal protein, and the level of BSA determines the severity of liver injury in a model of acetaminophen-induced liver injury and a model of acute tumor necrotic factor (TNF) -induced liver failure. BSA is a target of stress activated kinase (JNK) which then leads to impaired mitochondrial function and an increase in toxic reactive oxygen species. Interestingly, SAB gene activation and protein levels increase in diet-induced fatty liver disease and correlate with disease progression in experimental models and human fatty liver disease, Win added.

“We could prevent all of this progression by removing the BSA gene in the liver at the start of these experiments on adult animals which were then fed a high fat diet,” said Neil Kaplowitz, MD, professor of medicine and Thomas H Brem Chair of Medicine at the Keck School.

The project was started with a pilot grant to Win funded by the USC Research Center for Liver Diseases, and the Donald E. and Delia Baxter Foundation Faculty Fellows Award. The research was recently published in Hepatology, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Disease.

The mice were fed – supercharged, really – a diet of high fat food pellets with added sucrose and fructose water. Long-term eating of a diet high in fat and sugar causes obesity, diabetes, and fatty liver disease. But even in mice that had been on a diet high in fat and sugar for a year, “if we introduced this antisense targeting liver cells, when the mice had already established disease with inflammation and fibrosis in the liver, we could reverse it all, normalize their insulin resistance and dramatically decrease the buildup of fat in the liver as well as inflammation and fibrosis in the liver, ”Kaplowitz said.

One of the advantages, Win said, is that “we don’t need to remove or cut down or eliminate BSA protein entirely. Giving the dose just to maintain the normal level of BSA prevents or reverses the progression of the disease. With the benefit of advanced science in antisense oligonucleotides (ASO), designed and synthesized by collaborators at Ionis Pharmaceuticals Inc., of Carlsbad, Calif., The team is optimistic about SAB targeting DNA therapy.

Research shows how much liver damage – due to food choices – could be prevented with modest changes in behavior. Giving the mice antisense therapy for the first six months actually helped them lose weight. The authors caution that studies involving mice don’t always translate into assumptions about humans.

“There’s no question that a lot of the things that worked in mice don’t work in humans,” Kaplowitz said. But “our data suggest that this is a very strong potential therapeutic target, and we see no harm in directly interfering with BSA as it decreases.”

About the study

This research was funded by NIH Grants R01DK067215 (NK), Veronica Garrie Budnick Chair in Liver Disease (NK), Donald E. Award and Delia Baxter Foundation Faculty Fellows (SW), Pilot Project Award (SW ) by the USC Research Center for Liver Diseases (P30DK048522), and pilot project (SW) funding by the Rodent Metabolic Core of the Saban Research Institute at Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles.


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Walter Payton battled rare bile duct cancer caused by liver disease https://rogalevich.org/walter-payton-battled-rare-bile-duct-cancer-caused-by-liver-disease/ https://rogalevich.org/walter-payton-battled-rare-bile-duct-cancer-caused-by-liver-disease/#respond Mon, 01 Nov 2021 15:24:26 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/walter-payton-battled-rare-bile-duct-cancer-caused-by-liver-disease/ Remembering Walter Payton NFL great Walter Payton died 22 years ago today from a rare form of bile duct cancer called cholangiocarcinoma, possibly caused by his liver disease, primary sclerosing cholangitis. Payton was only 45 at the time and was hoping to get a liver transplant, but was no longer considered a viable host once […]]]>

Remembering Walter Payton

  • NFL great Walter Payton died 22 years ago today from a rare form of bile duct cancer called cholangiocarcinoma, possibly caused by his liver disease, primary sclerosing cholangitis.
  • Payton was only 45 at the time and was hoping to get a liver transplant, but was no longer considered a viable host once diagnosed with cancer.
  • Although it can occur in younger people, bile duct cancer is usually found in people over the age of 70. This type of cancer can be treated with surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy.

“Never die easily. “

That was the motto of the great Walter Payton of the NFL, who died 22 years ago today from a rare form of biliary cancer known as cholangiocarcinoma.

At just 45 years old at the time, Payton’s cancer was a complication of an equally rare form of liver disease known as primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) which causes inflammation, narrowing of the bile ducts and prevents bile to drain properly.

A liver transplant was the Hall of Fame’s only chance to survive PSC, but applicants are no longer viable hosts for a new organ once diagnosed with cancer.

Payton had a long career as a college footballer before being drafted by the Chicago Bears with the team’s first-round pick in the 1975 draft.

Considered by many to be the greatest running back to ever play, Payton would spend all 13 seasons of his career with the Bears, winning league MVP honors in 1977 and the Super Bowl in 1985.

His style of play was unique and aggressive, refusing to go out of bounds to avoid a hit, no matter what the dire straits were.

Walter Payton (above in 1981) was only 45 at the time of his death

Payton also specializes in inflicting as much pain on his tackles as he does on him, sometimes dragging two or three men onto the pitch with him to gain an extra yard.

In an era when professional athletic records only last a few years at best, he remains second in rushing yards of all time behind Emmitt Smith.

It was ten years after leaving football that Payton learned he had PSC.

His friends and former teammates opened up about Payton’s response to this news and his subsequent cancer diagnosis in the controversial 2011 biography. Sweetness: the enigmatic life of Walter Payton.

“I never heard him say, ‘Why me?’ Former Bears linebacker Mike Singletary noted. “I know I would have said, ‘Why me? Why me? There are other guys killing people, why me? I never heard Walter say that.

Bears offensive lineman Jimbo Covert echoed that sentiment.

“I was there with about 30 other guys. Walter took the time to go and see everyone personally, grab him and say, “What are you doing? – just to understand how you had been, ”recalls Covert. “Can you imagine how strong he must have been to do this?” He knew he was going to die.

Perhaps Payton put it best at his induction ceremony in 1993 when he told those gathered, “I’ll close by saying that life is short. It’s oh, so sweet.

What is bile duct cancer?

Bile duct cancer, also called cholangiocarcinoma, is a rare type of cancer that starts in the bile ducts, which are thin tubes that go from the liver to the small intestine. Bile is a liquid that helps digest fat from food. In the United States, approximately 8,000 people are diagnosed with this type of cancer each year, according to the American Cancer Society (ACS). This disease has a higher incidence in Southeast Asia, due to an infection that can lead to cancer of the bile ducts. Patients with PSC, like Payton, have an increased risk of cancer, including cholangiocarcinoma.

Although it can occur in younger people, bile duct cancer is usually found in people over the age of 70. This type of cancer can be treated with surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Side effects of this type of treatment can include nausea, hair loss, fatigue, and nerve pain. Fortunately, some of these side effects can now be reduced.

Stay positive despite cancer

Walter Payton had the love of life, choosing to take advantage of the time he had rather than bemoan the fact that his life would be cut short. Experts say SurvivorNet that having this kind of positive attitude while being able to find the joy of life can make a big difference in the fight against cancer.

In a previous interview, Dr Zuri Murrell said: “My patients who develop, even with stage 4 cancer, from the point that, about a month after diagnosis, I’m good enough to see who is going to be d ‘OK. Doesn’t that mean I’m good at saying cancer won’t develop?

Dr Murell said having a positive attitude can improve the prognosis in some cases. “But I’m good enough to say what kind of patient will still have that attitude and probably live the longest, even with a bad, bad disease.” And these are the patients who, they have gratitude in life.

Stay positive, it’s important

Learn more about SurvivorNet’s rigorous medical review process.


Chris Spargo is a senior reporter at SurvivorNet. Read more

Remembering Walter Payton

  • NFL great Walter Payton died 22 years ago today from a rare form of bile duct cancer called cholangiocarcinoma, possibly caused by his liver disease, primary sclerosing cholangitis.
  • Payton was only 45 at the time and was hoping to get a liver transplant, but was no longer considered a viable host once diagnosed with cancer.
  • Although it can occur in younger people, bile duct cancer is usually found in people over the age of 70. This type of cancer can be treated with surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy.

“Never die easily. “

That was the motto of the great Walter Payton of the NFL, who died 22 years ago today from a rare form of biliary cancer known as cholangiocarcinoma.

Read more

At just 45 years old at the time, Payton’s cancer was a complication of an equally rare form of liver disease known as primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) which causes inflammation, narrowing of the bile ducts and prevents bile to drain properly.

A liver transplant was the Hall of Fame’s only chance to survive PSC, but applicants are no longer viable hosts for a new organ once diagnosed with cancer.

Payton had a long career as a college footballer before being drafted by the Chicago Bears with the team’s first-round pick in the 1975 draft.

Considered by many to be the greatest running back to ever play, Payton would spend all 13 seasons of his career with the Bears, winning league MVP honors in 1977 and the Super Bowl in 1985.

His style of play was unique and aggressive, refusing to go out of bounds to avoid a hit, no matter what the dire straits were.

walter payton
Walter Payton (above in 1981) was only 45 at the time of his death

Payton also specializes in inflicting as much pain on his tackles as he does on him, sometimes dragging two or three men onto the pitch with him to gain an extra yard.

In an era when professional athletic records only last a few years at best, he remains second in rushing yards of all time behind Emmitt Smith.

It was ten years after leaving football that Payton learned he had PSC.

His friends and former teammates opened up about Payton’s response to this news and his subsequent cancer diagnosis in the controversial 2011 biography. Sweetness: the enigmatic life of Walter Payton.

“I never heard him say, ‘Why me?’ Former Bears linebacker Mike Singletary noted. “I know I would have said, ‘Why me? Why me? There are other guys killing people, why me? I never heard Walter say that.

Bears offensive lineman Jimbo Covert echoed that sentiment.

“I was there with about 30 other guys. Walter took the time to go and see everyone personally, grab him and say, “What are you doing? – just to understand how you had been, ”recalls Covert. “Can you imagine how strong he must have been to do this?” He knew he was going to die.

Perhaps Payton put it best at his induction ceremony in 1993 when he told those gathered, “I’ll close by saying that life is short. It’s oh, so sweet.

What is bile duct cancer?

Bile duct cancer, also called cholangiocarcinoma, is a rare type of cancer that starts in the bile ducts, which are thin tubes that go from the liver to the small intestine. Bile is a liquid that helps digest fat from food. In the United States, approximately 8,000 people are diagnosed with this type of cancer each year, according to the American Cancer Society (ACS). This disease has a higher incidence in Southeast Asia, due to an infection that can lead to cancer of the bile ducts. Patients with PSC, like Payton, have an increased risk of cancer, including cholangiocarcinoma.

Although it can occur in younger people, bile duct cancer is usually found in people over the age of 70. This type of cancer can be treated with surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Side effects of this type of treatment can include nausea, hair loss, fatigue, and nerve pain. Fortunately, some of these side effects can now be reduced.

Stay positive despite cancer

Walter Payton had the love of life, choosing to take advantage of the time he had rather than bemoan the fact that his life would be cut short. Experts say SurvivorNet that having this kind of positive attitude while being able to find the joy of life can make a big difference in the fight against cancer.

In a previous interview, Dr Zuri Murrell said: “My patients who develop, even with stage 4 cancer, from the point that, about a month after diagnosis, I’m good enough to see who is going to be d ‘OK. Doesn’t that mean I’m good at saying cancer won’t develop?

Dr Murell said having a positive attitude can improve the prognosis in some cases. “But I’m good enough to say what kind of patient will still have that attitude and probably live the longest, even with a bad, bad disease.” And these are the patients who, they have gratitude in life.

Stay positive, it’s important

Learn more about SurvivorNet’s rigorous medical review process.


Chris Spargo is a senior reporter at SurvivorNet. Read more


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USC Scientists Discover New Therapeutic Target to Treat Fatty Liver Disease https://rogalevich.org/usc-scientists-discover-new-therapeutic-target-to-treat-fatty-liver-disease/ https://rogalevich.org/usc-scientists-discover-new-therapeutic-target-to-treat-fatty-liver-disease/#respond Fri, 29 Oct 2021 21:11:15 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/usc-scientists-discover-new-therapeutic-target-to-treat-fatty-liver-disease/ (Illustration / iStock) About 80 million Americans suffer from fatty liver disease unrelated to alcohol abuse. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is associated with obesity and diabetes and can lead to more serious liver damage such as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), cirrhosis, and liver cancer. Cardiovascular disease, colorectal cancer, and breast cancer are actually the leading causes […]]]>

(Illustration / iStock)

About 80 million Americans suffer from fatty liver disease unrelated to alcohol abuse. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is associated with obesity and diabetes and can lead to more serious liver damage such as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), cirrhosis, and liver cancer. Cardiovascular disease, colorectal cancer, and breast cancer are actually the leading causes of death in patients with fatty liver disease.

Several drugs in late stages of development have failed due to the complexity of the disease, poor efficacy or toxicity of the drugs. Although several clinical trials have been conducted over the past decades, there is currently no FDA approved pharmaceutical treatment for NASH.

To understand the complexity of fatty liver disease progression, a team of scientists from USC explored the molecular mechanism in experimental NAFL / NASH. The project led to the discovery of a plausible therapeutic target gene, SH3BP5, also known as BSA.

Sanda wins

“This discovery is the culmination of years of work by the team including USC bioinformatics specialists, pathologists, students, visiting researchers and collaborators,” said Sanda Win, MD, PhD, Assistant professor of medicine research in the GI / liver division of the department. of Medicine at USC’s Keck School of Medicine.

As Win explains, BSA is a protein in the outer membrane of mitochondria, known as the powerhouse of the cell. The biological function of BSA was not known until researchers at USC discovered it 10 years ago. BSA is a pivotal protein, and the level of BSA determines the severity of liver injury in a model of acetaminophen-induced liver injury and a model of acute tumor necrotic factor (TNF) -induced liver failure. BSA is a target of stress activated kinase (JNK) which then leads to impaired mitochondrial function and an increase in toxic reactive oxygen species. Interestingly, SAB gene activation and protein levels increase in diet-induced fatty liver disease and correlate with disease progression in experimental models and human fatty liver disease, Win added.

Neil kaplowitz

“We could prevent all of this progression by removing the BSA gene in the liver at the start of these experiments on adult animals which were then fed a high fat diet,” said Neil Kaplowitz, MD, professor of medicine and Thomas H Brem Chair of Medicine at the Keck School.

The project was started with a pilot grant to Win funded by the USC Research Center for Liver Diseases, and the Donald E. and Delia Baxter Foundation Faculty Fellows Award. The research was recently published in Hepatology, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Disease.

The mice were fed – supercharged, really – a diet of high fat food pellets with added sucrose and fructose water. Long-term eating of a diet high in fat and sugar causes obesity, diabetes, and fatty liver disease. But even in mice that had been on a diet high in fat and sugar for a year, “if we introduced this antisense targeting liver cells, when the mice had already established disease with inflammation and fibrosis in the liver, we could reverse it all, normalize their insulin resistance and dramatically decrease the buildup of fat in the liver as well as inflammation and fibrosis in the liver, ”Kaplowitz said.

One of the advantages, said Win, is that “we don’t need to remove or remove or remove the BSA protein entirely. Giving the dose just to maintain the normal level of BSA prevents or reverses the progression of the disease. With the benefit of advanced science in antisense oligonucleotides (ASO), designed and synthesized by collaborators at Ionis Pharmaceuticals Inc., of Carlsbad, Calif., The team is optimistic about DNA therapy targeting BSA.

Research shows how much liver damage – due to food choices – could be prevented with modest changes in behavior. Giving the mice antisense therapy for the first six months actually helped them lose weight. The authors caution that studies involving mice don’t always translate into assumptions about humans.

“There’s no question that a lot of the things that worked in mice don’t work in humans,” Kaplowitz said. But “our data suggest that this is a very strong potential therapeutic target, and we see no harm in directly interfering with BSA when reducing it.”

About the study

This research was funded by NIH Grants R01DK067215 (NK), Veronica Garrie Budnick Chair in Liver Disease (NK), Donald E. Award and Delia Baxter Foundation Faculty Fellows (SW), Pilot Project Award (SW ) by the USC Research Center for Liver Disease (P30DK048522), and a Grant Funding Pilot (SW) by the Rodent Metabolic Core at the Saban Research Institute at Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles.


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