Liver medicine – Rogalevich http://rogalevich.org/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 18:55:52 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://rogalevich.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.png Liver medicine – Rogalevich http://rogalevich.org/ 32 32 BNP holds prayer sessions across the country for Khaleda’s recovery https://rogalevich.org/bnp-holds-prayer-sessions-across-the-country-for-khaledas-recovery/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 15:57:11 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/bnp-holds-prayer-sessions-across-the-country-for-khaledas-recovery/ In the capital, the program took place in the southern premises of the Baitul Mukarram National Mosque TBS Report 26 November 2021, 15:15 Last modification: November 26, 2021, 9:57 PM Photo: Joynal Abedin Shishir “> Photo: Joynal Abedin Shishir BNP held special prayer sessions after Jummah’s prayers across the country on Friday, in anticipation of […]]]>

In the capital, the program took place in the southern premises of the Baitul Mukarram National Mosque

TBS Report

26 November 2021, 15:15

Last modification: November 26, 2021, 9:57 PM

Photo: Joynal Abedin Shishir

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Photo: Joynal Abedin Shishir

BNP held special prayer sessions after Jummah’s prayers across the country on Friday, in anticipation of a speedy recovery for party chairman Khaleda Zia.

In the capital, the program was organized by the political party in the southern premises of the Baitul Mukarram National Mosque.

BNP standing committee member Khandaker Mosharraf Hossain, who was the main guest of the prayer ceremony, said: “We pray to Allah for the reestablishment of our leader in mosques and other religious institutions across the country.

There are no legal obstacles preventing Khaleda from going abroad for advanced medical treatment, but the government does not allow him to leave without presenting a valid reason, the BNP leader added.

“Her [Khaleda] the physical condition is very critical and is gradually deteriorating. At present, there is no other treatment for her in the country. We therefore ask the government to organize his treatment abroad, “said Mosharraf Hossain.

However, the government says she cannot leave Bangladesh under the conditions of temporary release from prison.

Among others, BNP standing committee member Nazrul Islam Khan, Mirza Abbas, Dhaka city BNP unit manager Aman Ullah Aman and member secretary Aminul Haque were also present on the occasion.

Earlier Wednesday, the BNP announced an 8-day program from November 25 to December 4 demanding the release and treatment of its party leader Khaleda Zia abroad.

Dr AZM Zahid Hossain, a personal physician to the former prime minister and a member of the medical board trained to treat Khaleda Zia, told BBC Bangla she suffered from arthritis, diabetes, kidney and heart problems.

By now her liver problem has become more complicated and that is why the medicine for other diseases is not working properly.

“Chronic liver disease has reached such a critical stage that it sometimes has gastrointestinal bleeding (bleeding in the stomach),” said Dr Zahid Hossain.

He added that a liver operation has become an emergency but there are no modern facilities for such an operation in Bangladesh.

In recent days, BNP leaders and activists across the country have staged protests to assert their demands and clash with law enforcement in different parts of the country.

BNP lawmakers had previously threatened to resign if their party leader was not allowed to travel abroad.

The BNP chief landed in prison in February 2018 in the Zia Orphanage Trust corruption case. On October 30 of the same year, the High Court extended his sentence to 10 years, dismissing his appeal.

Following the Covid-19 epidemic, the government granted him temporary conditional release on March 25 at the request of his family. So far, his release time has been extended four times.

She still faces at least 36 ongoing cases.


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A woman ate a mushroom from her garden in Newport. it almost killed her https://rogalevich.org/a-woman-ate-a-mushroom-from-her-garden-in-newport-it-almost-killed-her/ Wed, 24 Nov 2021 17:52:04 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/a-woman-ate-a-mushroom-from-her-garden-in-newport-it-almost-killed-her/ That night, however, at a meeting at a friend’s house, she didn’t really feel like champagne, which was unusual for her, she said. That night she became extremely ill. And it wasn’t ripe cheese or vintage wine. The mushroom she had eaten, she was later told, turned out to have a name: the hat of […]]]>

That night, however, at a meeting at a friend’s house, she didn’t really feel like champagne, which was unusual for her, she said. That night she became extremely ill. And it wasn’t ripe cheese or vintage wine. The mushroom she had eaten, she was later told, turned out to have a name: the hat of death. It also has a reputation: one of the deadliest mushrooms in the world. His toxins attacked his organs and caused vomiting and, at the same time, diarrhea. Her doctor told her that her loved ones should come soon and that she may need a liver transplant to save her life.

A month and a half later, King, 62, is alive to talk about it, assigning care at Newport Hospital and a combination of treatments, including a non-FDA approved drug made from thistle extract. -Marie, for saving her life. liver. This week, she’s getting ready for Thanksgiving in her New York City apartment. Counting her blessings, she will eat turkey.

“But no wild mushrooms,” she says. “No foraging at all.”

Definitive statistics on mushroom poisonings in Rhode Island are difficult to come by. But they appear to be relatively rare: According to Newport hospital’s parent company, Lifespan Corp., this hospital has had fungal poisoning this year and one last year. Miriam Hospital also had one in both years. The state’s largest and busiest hospital, Rhode Island Hospital, had four this year, up from two last year – double a very small sample.

But enthusiasts say mushroom research is growing in popularity, especially as the COVID-19 pandemic has forced people to indulge their leisure time outdoors. It is safe, if you take precautions.

“I am an example of how it can be done well and safely – it is so important to know what you are doing, to follow the rules and to be 100% sure that you identify a fungus”, said Dr. Victoria Leytin, a brunette emergency doctor who has worked at Miriam and Newport hospitals and has been looking for mushrooms for a few years. “It’s a fun hobby, but you have to do it very carefully and take it very seriously. “

Leytin has never seen mushroom poisoning in his medical career, aside from a few cases of magic mushrooms and one case where someone had general stomach problems after eating mushrooms with no long-term effects. Leytin, who was not involved in King’s care, said that as a rule, she did not eat mushrooms with “gills” on the underside. This includes the Death Hat, as well as some edible varieties, but Leytin is playing it safe. There is a saying in the mushroom community: “There are old mushroom hunters, and there are daring mushroom hunters, but there are no old daring mushroom hunters. “

Walter Sturgeon, the Ohio-based author of several mushroom field guides who also consulted with poison control centers, said a photograph of the mushroom King had eaten could have been a death hat, but also a species called “angel of destruction”. “They are both similar and deadly.

King is from Nottinghamshire, England, the home of Robin Hood, who, King noted, would likely have eaten mushrooms himself.

She moved across the pond to New York about 30 years ago and has also had a home in Newport for about 25 years. About six years ago, she bought a house on Bellevue Avenue, with a yard that could accommodate some light food. She had attended a lecture at the library on finding and identifying fungi, and had also purchased a calendar about them. But she missed a guided walk in Norman Bird Sanctuary because it was full.

One of the lecturers at the library, Ryan Bouchard of the Rhode Island-based Mushroom Hunting Foundation, said they explicitly mentioned the death ceiling as something to be avoided.

“Our conversation is fraught with warnings,” said Bouchard, who added that he and his fiancee, Emily Schmidt, had taught thousands of people to feed themselves safely. “Mushroom hunting is safe, but you have to identify the species. “

Bouchard says people should never eat a mushroom they can’t identify, let alone a wild mushroom with gills, which should only be eaten by experts – as the calendar book he sells suggests. to people. “When in doubt,” the book says, “throw it away”.

Some people he knows have fallen ill from mildly poisonous mushrooms which cause stomach upset but are not fatal, but this is the first case he knows where someone has eaten a deadly mushroom. But recently, some people’s dogs have died after eating mushrooms, he said.

For the past few years, King had eaten an edible mushroom called lion’s mane mushroom from his yard, on a tree stump. When she returns to the UK, she also searches for her food there, although her husband did not participate: he joked that she was trying to poison him with her cooking.

A few mistakes led King to poison himself in October. She admitted that they tell you to watch out for mushrooms. But she had loaned the mushroom calendar guide to the person who does her lawn, she said. And she usually asks him for advice on mushrooms, but he wasn’t in town that day. She sent a photo to a friend, requesting a consultation, but the friend did not respond.

When she went ahead and ate it anyway, it really didn’t taste that different from other mushrooms – “It was pretty good, I hate to say it,” King said – but luckily , she stopped at one of them. One of them made her sick enough.

As she fought for her life in the hospital, her husband James called friends for advice. A friend in the pharmaceutical industry – the husband of the lady with whom she had drunk champagne with the first night, in this case – helped them find the milk thistle extract drug, an intravenous drug sold. under the brand name Legalon.

It took a long time to get the drug, which prevents toxins from shutting down the liver. It is not approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration. The manufacturer, Mylan, had to get clearance from the FDA to use it as a new investigational drug in this case.

King credits the team of doctors and nurses at Newport Hospital for saving his life. She’s not sure whether milk thistle made a difference or not, but she believes she received more careful care there from a team led by Dr Eric Wright than she could have. ‘have if she had been back to New York.

In the meantime, she has eaten mushrooms since she was close to death, but only the ones she bought from Stop and Shop.

“People need to know to be really, really careful,” she said. “I don’t want anyone else to go through this. They may not be so lucky.


Brian Amaral can be reached at brian.amaral@globe.com. Follow him on twitter @ bamaral44.



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Alcohol does not prevent heart disease https://rogalevich.org/alcohol-does-not-prevent-heart-disease/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 17:30:27 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/alcohol-does-not-prevent-heart-disease/ Dr Gabe Mirkin If you think moderate alcohol consumption helps prevent heart attacks, think again. The alcoholic beverage industry promotes studies showing that moderate drinkers live slightly longer than non-drinkers, but the non-drinker groups in these studies included people who gave up alcohol on the instructions of the drinker. their doctors: those with high blood […]]]>
Dr Gabe Mirkin

If you think moderate alcohol consumption helps prevent heart attacks, think again. The alcoholic beverage industry promotes studies showing that moderate drinkers live slightly longer than non-drinkers, but the non-drinker groups in these studies included people who gave up alcohol on the instructions of the drinker. their doctors: those with high blood pressure, diabetes, high cholesterol, certain types of cancer, heart, kidney, liver or lung disease or other health problems, and recovering alcoholics. A recent study with a 20-year follow-up of 4,028 German adults aged 18 to 64 found that when people who had stopped drinking for medical reasons were removed from the control group, moderate drinkers did not live longer. than non-drinkers (PLOS MedicineNov 2 2021; 18 (11): e1003819).

An earlier analysis of 45 studies of over 9,000 UK adults showed that once researchers removed people who quit drinking alcohol for critical health reasons, the drinkers showed no benefit. on non-drinkers. The authors of this review believe that no one should drink because they have been told that alcohol has health benefits (J Stud Alcohol and Drugs2017 May; 78 (3): 375-386).

Alcohol and heart damage
Drinking any amount of alcohol is associated with an increased risk of irregular heartbeat or atrial fibrillation (European Heart J, Mar 21, 2021; 42 (12): 1170-1177). A study of 79,000 Swedish adults, aged 45 to 83, followed up to 12 years, showed that those who drank any amount of wine or alcohol daily had an increased risk of atrial fibrillation, a abnormally fast heartbeat which can cause clots, stroke and heart failure (J American College of Cardiology, July 14, 2014). The more they drank, the more likely they were to develop atrial fibrillation.

People who have only one drink a day have an increased risk of heart disease (J American College of Cardiology, December 5, 2016) and an enlarged upper heart and irregular heartbeat that causes clots and strokes (J Am Heart Assoc2016 Sep 14; 5: e004060; J Am Coll Cardiol, 2016; 68 (23): 2567-2576). Binge drinking, defined as having five or more drinks at one time, further increased the risk. Data from six studies of more than 12,500 cases of atrial fibrillation showed that each additional drink per day of any type of alcohol increased the risk of an irregular heartbeat by eight percent (J Am Coll Card, July 14, 2014). Many other studies have linked alcohol use to atrial fibrillation, high blood pressure, heart failure, and stroke. The association is not a cause, but I think these studies call for caution.

Some heart benefits of drinking small amounts of alcohol continue to appear in other studies. A recent study of 48,423 British men and women found that light drinking was associated with a reduced risk of heart attack, stroke or death in people with heart disease (BMC MedicineJul 26, 2021; 19 (167)). However, the authors conclude that their study “should not encourage non-drinkers to drink lightly because of the known harmful effects on other health problems, such as cancer.” See Alcohol at any dose can increase the risk of cancer

Alcohol and your liver
Alcohol is a poison that has a strong affinity to bind to water, so it extracts water from cells and causes them to shrivel up like a prune. Alcohol can damage all types of cells in your body, and your liver is the only organ that protects you. Your liver breaks down alcohol at a relatively constant rate, but the alcohol is first converted to acetaldehyde, which is even more toxic. It can make you want to throw up and burn your face.

Regular alcohol consumption increases the risk of permanent liver damage called cirrhosis (Journal of hepatology, January 26, 2015). Wine is associated with a lower risk of liver damage than beer or alcohol. The authors of this study warn that older drinkers are more likely to have health problems affected by alcohol or to take drugs that impair their ability to metabolize alcohol.

My recommendations
Many people mistakenly believe that it is safe for women to have up to one drink per day and for men to have up to two drinks per day. Almost 30 percent of North Americans drink more than this. The studies I have listed in this article and many others suggest that no amount of alcohol is “safe” or beneficial. Whatever decision you make regarding your own alcohol consumption, don’t base your decision on bad information from the alcoholic beverage industry.

Dr Gabe Mirkin is a villager. Learn more about www.drmirkin.com


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Health Benefits of Turmeric in Winter https://rogalevich.org/health-benefits-of-turmeric-in-winter/ Sun, 21 Nov 2021 03:25:05 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/health-benefits-of-turmeric-in-winter/ Image source: IMAGE FILE Health Benefits of Turmeric in Winter Winters are one of the most beautiful times of the year. Delicious baked goods, accompanied by a cup of hot chocolate, are an absolute treat. The winter season brings us closer to family and friends around festive celebrations. Nevertheless, winters are harsh and can be […]]]>
Image source: IMAGE FILE

Health Benefits of Turmeric in Winter

Winters are one of the most beautiful times of the year. Delicious baked goods, accompanied by a cup of hot chocolate, are an absolute treat. The winter season brings us closer to family and friends around festive celebrations. Nevertheless, winters are harsh and can be harmful to health. While being in the festive mood, it’s essential to remember to keep warm and watch out for potential infections.

The holiday season sees an exchange of many gifts. To fully enjoy the holiday spirit, you need to stay healthy. Turmeric is a magical ingredient that can be used in almost any dish and helps you stay healthy. It acts as an antifungal, antibacterial and antiviral which acts as an immunity booster.

Here are some exclusive benefits of adding turmeric to your winter diet:

Physical Illnesses: Turmeric is a natural substance found on earth. Its healing properties include relief of common winter sinuses, sore joints, indigestion, colds, and coughs. For instant relief, you can add a pinch of turmeric to drinks like milk and tea. Daily consumption of turmeric can also help control blood sugar.

Winters: The holiday season is a happy time and we tend to indulge in alcohol and other unhealthy foods. What we call “vacation weight” may be an unidentified health issue by the end of the season. A dash of turmeric can go a long way in improving liver function. Turmeric is an antioxidant that benefits the body from the inside out.

To survive harsh winters, you need to eat foods high in fat and protein. We also consume hot drinks which can be soothing but disturb the digestive system. Turmeric adds flavor to foods and aids digestion. Consuming foods with turmeric also gives your skin a healthy glow as the body gets rid of toxins.

Ancient Medicine: Turmeric has been a part of Asian foods and Ayurveda for many centuries. The healing properties of turmeric, especially important in winter, are magical. The main advantage is that it is a natural antioxidant. It helps you cleanse your body of harmful substances.

Flu Season: The onset of winter marks the start of flu season. In most Asian homes, turmeric milk is a natural medicine. Many pregnant women also seek comfort in turmeric milk for mild flu. Turmeric helps clear bacterial infections and relieves sore throat.

Conclusion

Turmeric is a household favorite all year round. It is not only a good condiment, but also a healer. It is wise to spice things up with turmeric because artificial flavors and chemicals are part of our food groups. The healing properties of turmeric have been studied for its blood thinning properties, reducing the risk of cancer and treating Alzheimer’s disease.


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Philips Evolves its Ultrasound Line with New Radiology Imaging Tools and Features to Increase Diagnostic Confidence and Workflow Efficiency https://rogalevich.org/philips-evolves-its-ultrasound-line-with-new-radiology-imaging-tools-and-features-to-increase-diagnostic-confidence-and-workflow-efficiency/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 04:08:51 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/philips-evolves-its-ultrasound-line-with-new-radiology-imaging-tools-and-features-to-increase-diagnostic-confidence-and-workflow-efficiency/ November 18, 2021 – Philips Royal, a healthcare technology leader, announced that it has received 510 (k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for its new liver fat quantification tools as part of the latest release of its EPIQ Elite and Affiniti ultrasound systems, bringing the cost and affordability advantages of ultrasound […]]]>

November 18, 2021 – Philips Royal, a healthcare technology leader, announced that it has received 510 (k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for its new liver fat quantification tools as part of the latest release of its EPIQ Elite and Affiniti ultrasound systems, bringing the cost and affordability advantages of ultrasound for the diagnosis of early stage liver disease. Presented to this year Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), the new tools will allow clinicians to monitor liver health.

Fatty liver disease is the most common and earliest stage of chronic liver disease. The incidence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is increased by various risk factors, including type 2 diabetes and obesity. It is estimated that NAFLD may be present in approximately 25% of the world’s population.1 NAFLD includes milder fatty liver disease, as well as more severe forms that include inflammation, a condition called non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), and fibrosis. Research suggests that early intervention empowers patients to make lifestyle changes that can help prevent liver disease,1 while early assessment of fatty liver disease is essential to potentially reverse this progression of liver disease.2

“With a quantitative way of measuring liver fat, it’s much easier for us to let the attending physician know where the patient is quantitatively on the NAFLD spectrum,” said Richard G. Barr, MD, Ph.D. , President, Radiology Consultant Inc. and Medical Director of Southwoods Imaging. “With traditional grayscale imaging, we could only tell whether the liver had a high degree of fatty infiltration or whether it was normal, but it was very difficult to assess whether the fatty liver was benign. , moderate or severe. The attenuation imagery now gives us a numerical value that will allow us to follow the patient over time. With the combination of a quantitative assessment of liver fat and stiffness, the likelihood of NASH can be assessed. “

With the extended remote functionality of Live collaboration On the EPIQ and Affiniti platforms, technicians can also securely access on-demand, real-time advice and decision support to improve diagnostic reliability and workflow efficiency during exams.

“[The] This announcement demonstrates the continued advancement of our ultrasound portfolio to increase diagnostic confidence and workflow efficiency, ”said Jeff Cohen, general manager of ultrasound at Philips. “The quantification of hepatic fat accessible by ultrasound is a screening and early diagnosis tool that will allow many more patients to take charge of their health by making simple changes to their lifestyle. “

Improve the diagnosis and treatment of early and late stage liver disease

Philips Ultrasound Systems EPIQ and Affiniti on version 9.0 now support radiologists and hepatologists in the diagnosis and treatment of early to advanced liver disease, making it easier to conduct longitudinal studies to assess disease progression hepatic. With this latest release, the company further strengthens its liver solution and extends its full availability to Affiniti 70 and Affiniti 50, supported by the innovative PureWave C5-1 Curved transducer, now also available on Affiniti 50, to improve confidence abdominal diagnosis, hepatology, as well as vascular and gynecological ultrasound examinations. The new liver fat quantification tools complement the company’s existing ultimate solution for liver assessment with real-time shear wave imaging, contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS), and fusion and navigation. Liver fat quantification tools, which provide ease of use as well as intuitive workflow and reporting, are available on the C5-1 transducer and the mC7-2 small footprint MicroConvex transducer, to accommodate to different body types, from smaller patients to high BMI patients.3

Philips liver fat quantification solution launched at RSNA 2021

Philips will launch its liver fat quantification solution at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) annual meeting later this month. For more information on Philips Liver Fat Quantification, including live demonstrations, follow @PhilipsLiveFrom for updates throughout the RSNA event. For more information on Philips’ liver ultrasound solutions portfolio, visit Philips Liver Assessment Webpage, and join Philips at RSNA 2021 where the company will highlight its latest portfolio of radiology workflow solutions and smart imaging systems connected to increase efficiency and diagnostic confidence in precision care and treatment.

The references:

1 Asrani et al. Burden of liver disease around the world. J Hepatology. 2019; 1.
2 Younossi ZM. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease – A global public health perspective. J Hepatol. 2019; 70 (3): 531-544.
3 Chen J. Achieve dramatic improvements in the efficiency, sensitivity and bandwidth of ultrasonic transducers. Koninklijke Philips Electronics NV 2006.



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SBIR grant awarded to develop treatment for hepatorenal syndrome associated with alcoholic liver disease https://rogalevich.org/sbir-grant-awarded-to-develop-treatment-for-hepatorenal-syndrome-associated-with-alcoholic-liver-disease/ https://rogalevich.org/sbir-grant-awarded-to-develop-treatment-for-hepatorenal-syndrome-associated-with-alcoholic-liver-disease/#respond Tue, 09 Nov 2021 17:24:00 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/sbir-grant-awarded-to-develop-treatment-for-hepatorenal-syndrome-associated-with-alcoholic-liver-disease/ The Institute of Human Virology (IHV) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) and MitoPower LLC (“MitoPower”) have received a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant of up to $ 6.5 million. dollars over five years from the National Institutes. of the National Institute of Health on alcohol abuse and alcoholism. The funds […]]]>

The Institute of Human Virology (IHV) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) and MitoPower LLC (“MitoPower”) have received a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant of up to $ 6.5 million. dollars over five years from the National Institutes. of the National Institute of Health on alcohol abuse and alcoholism. The funds will support the development of MitoPower’s flagship compound, MP-04, for the treatment of kidney dysfunction due to alcoholic liver disease, a condition known as hepatorenal syndrome associated with alcoholic liver disease (SHR). The IHV, a center of excellence of the Global Virus Network (GVN), will conduct ascending single and multiple dose studies in humans to test the safety of the compound, followed by a phase 1b study in patients.

There are currently no treatment options that specifically address the cellular dysfunction and systemic inflammatory response that contribute to severe impairment of liver and kidney function and progressive organ failure in patients with alcoholic hepatitis. severe. We are working to complete studies enabling IND for MP-04 and are delighted to collaborate with IHV to characterize this promising compound in human studies. “

Mani Subramanian, MD, PhD and CEO of MitoPower

More than 250,000 hospitalizations each year in the United States are due to complications from alcoholic liver disease. SHR is an acute complication of progressive cirrhosis (scarring of the liver) or severe alcoholic hepatitis (inflammation of the liver) leading to kidney failure. SHR is associated with death rates as high as 50%, with many patients requiring invasive treatments such as dialysis and / or liver transplantation.

“There is an urgent and unmet need for effective treatment to treat RHS caused by severe alcoholic hepatitis and cirrhosis. Globally, the incidence and prevalence of alcoholic liver disease continues to increase and remains a major cause of liver failure and liver transplantation, ”said Prof. Shyam Kottilil, MBBS, PhD, Professor of Medicine and Director of the Division of Clinical Care and Research, Institute of Human Virology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, and Senior Advisor to the Global Virus Network (GVN). “MP-04 is a new therapy that has shown promise in preclinical studies for reversing organ dysfunction and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) which shows promise for potentially reversing SHR.”

Theodore E. Woodward Stephen N. Davis Chair in Medicine, MBBS, FRCP, FACE, MACP, said, “We are honored to collaborate with academic research with industry to develop therapies that improve the health and quality of life of our patients, especially for chronic diseases. diseases for which we have no known cure.

UMSOM Dean E. Albert Reece, MD, PhD, MBA, Executive Vice President of Medical Affairs, UM Baltimore, and Distinguished Professor John Z. and Akiko K. Bowers, Said: Black Americans and Mexican Americans are more likely to suffer worse results. Developing an effective treatment will be the first step in finding a way to address these disparities. “

Robert Gallo, MD, Homer & Martha Gudelsky Distinguished Professor of Medicine, Co-Founder and Director of the Institute of Human Virology at UMSOM, and Co-Founder and International Scientific Director of the Global Virus Network (GVN), said: “The Institute is pleased to see that the portfolio of our clinical trials unit continues to grow under the formidable leadership of Professor Kottilil. As we continue to focus on therapies for viruses such as HIV and SARS-CoV-2, it is also important that we research innovations that can combat devastating chronic diseases, such as liver disease and heart disease. kidney dysfunctions. “

This award was presented by the National Institutes of Health under number U44 AA029833. The contents of this press release are the sole responsibility of the author and do not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.


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Ascletis and Suzhou Alphamab Extend Partnership to Global License Agreement for ASC22 (Envafolimab) to Treat Hepatitis B and Other Viral Diseases https://rogalevich.org/ascletis-and-suzhou-alphamab-extend-partnership-to-global-license-agreement-for-asc22-envafolimab-to-treat-hepatitis-b-and-other-viral-diseases/ https://rogalevich.org/ascletis-and-suzhou-alphamab-extend-partnership-to-global-license-agreement-for-asc22-envafolimab-to-treat-hepatitis-b-and-other-viral-diseases/#respond Mon, 08 Nov 2021 00:30:00 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/ascletis-and-suzhou-alphamab-extend-partnership-to-global-license-agreement-for-asc22-envafolimab-to-treat-hepatitis-b-and-other-viral-diseases/ HANGZHOU, China and SHAOXING, China and SUZHOU, China, November 7, 2021 / PRNewswire / – Ascletis Pharma Inc. (1672.HK) and Suzhou Alphamab Co., Ltd. (Suzhou Alphamab) jointly announce today that Ascletis subsidiary and Suzhou Alphamab have entered into an exclusive and global licensing agreement outside Greater China for ASC22 (Envafolimab) to treat all viral diseases, […]]]>

HANGZHOU, China and SHAOXING, China and SUZHOU, China, November 7, 2021 / PRNewswire / – Ascletis Pharma Inc. (1672.HK) and Suzhou Alphamab Co., Ltd. (Suzhou Alphamab) jointly announce today that Ascletis subsidiary and Suzhou Alphamab have entered into an exclusive and global licensing agreement outside Greater China for ASC22 (Envafolimab) to treat all viral diseases, including hepatitis B. ASC22, also known as KN035, is a first PD-L1 antibody injected subcutaneously. The oncology indications are under development by Jiangsu Alphamab Biopharmaceuticals Co., Ltd. and an application for a Biologic Oncology License (“BLA”) of KN035 has been submitted to the China National Medicine Products Administration. december 2020.

Under the terms of this agreement, Ascletis obtained an exclusive and worldwide license excluding Greater China of Suzhou Alphamab to develop and commercialize ASC22 for all viral diseases, including hepatitis B. Ascletis will pay Suzhou Alphamab an upfront cash payment and Suzhou Alphamab will be eligible to receive payments from Ascletis on development, regulatory milestones and commercial as well as mid-teens tiered royalties of approximately twenty percent on future sales of ASC22. Suzhou Alphamab will manufacture ASC22 for clinical trials and the commercialization of viral indications for Ascletis.

With the exclusive license agreement in Greater China jointly announced by Ascletis and Suzhou Alphamab on January 14, 2019 (Details referring to the press release: https://www.ascletis.com/news_detail/171/id/290.html), Ascletis has now obtained a worldwide and exclusive license from Suzhou Alphamab to develop and commercialize ASC22 for all viral diseases, including hepatitis B. Ascletis has worldwide sales for ASC22 of all viral diseases.

ASC22 is the world’s most advanced clinical stage immunotherapy for the functional cure of chronic hepatitis B (CHB), i.e. loss of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) , by blocking the PD-1 / PD-L1 pathway. A phase IIa clinical trial of AUC22 in patients with HCB has been completed and data indicated that there was a trend for dose-dependent reduction of HBsAg after dosing. single 0.3, 1.0 or 2.5 mg / kg ASC22. Among three patients receiving a dose of 2.5 mg / kg, one patient achieved a maximal reduction in HBsAg of 1.2 logten IU / mL during the 12 week follow-up. The results of Phase IIa will be presented in parallel oral session at The Liver Meeting® 2021 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD), one of the world’s largest meetings on liver disease and will be held during November 12 to November 15 This year. ASC22 is currently in a Phase IIb clinical trial in China with the full enrollment of 149 CHB patients completed in July of this year and preliminary phase IIb data indicated that a reduction in HBsAg was observed in the 1 mg / kg ASC22 group once every two weeks plus nucleos

Jinzi J. Wu, PhD, Founder, CEO of Ascletis said, “Suzhou Alphamab is a leading biopharmaceutical company and we are delighted to partner with them globally. Ascletis is a world leader in the development of antiviral drugs such as hepatitis B which remains a Thanks to the strategic partnership with Alphamab, we are accelerating the global development of ASC22 as a first class immunotherapy against HBV with data encouraging the efficacy of phases IIa and IIb as well as the benefit in terms of safety and convenience, and I hope to offer a functional remedy to patients with hepatitis B soon. “

About Ascletis

Ascletis is an innovative R&D-driven biotechnology listed on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange (1672.HK), a global platform spanning the entire value chain from discovery and development to manufacturing and commercialization . Ascletis is committed to developing and commercializing innovative drugs in the areas of viral diseases, NASH / PBC and cancer (oral cancer metabolic checkpoint and immune checkpoint inhibitors) to meet unmet medical needs both in China and globally. Led by a management team with deep expertise and proven track record, Ascletis targets therapeutic areas with unmet medical needs from a global perspective and effectively advances pipeline developments with the aim of dominating global competition. To date, Ascletis has three commercialized products and 18 strong R&D pipelines of globally competitive drug candidates, and is actively exploring new therapeutic areas.

1. Viral diseases: (1) Hepatitis B virus (functional cure): focus on breakthrough therapies for functional cure of CHB with PD-L1 antibody injected subcutaneously – ASC22 and Pegasys® as drugs basic. (2) HIV / AIDS: ASC22, an immune therapy to restore HIV-specific immune responses and eventually lead to functional recovery in HIV-infected patients. (3) Hepatitis C: successful launch of an all-oral treatment regimen combining ASCLEVIR® and GANOVO® (RDV / DNV regimen). 2. Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis / primary biliary cholangitis: Gannex, a company 100% owned by Ascletis, is engaged in the R&D and commercialization of new drugs in the field of NASH. Gannex has three clinical-stage drug candidates against three different targets – FASN, THRβ and FXR, three fixed-dose combinations for NASH, and a PBC program targeting FXR. 3. Cancer (oral cancer metabolic checkpoint and immune checkpoint inhibitors): a pipeline of oral inhibitors targeting FASN, which plays a key role in cancer lipid metabolism, and a pipeline of point inhibitors next-generation small molecule PD-L1 immune control system. 4. Exploratory indications: Acne: Following NASH and recurrent GBM, the third indication for AUC40 has been approved for entry into the Phase 2 clinical trial.

SOURCE Ascletis Pharma Inc.

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He cannot heal his father. But a scientist’s research can help everyone. https://rogalevich.org/he-cannot-heal-his-father-but-a-scientists-research-can-help-everyone/ https://rogalevich.org/he-cannot-heal-his-father-but-a-scientists-research-can-help-everyone/#respond Thu, 04 Nov 2021 15:18:29 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/he-cannot-heal-his-father-but-a-scientists-research-can-help-everyone/ CAMBRIDGE, Massachusetts – When Sharif Tabebordbar was born in 1986, his father, Jafar, was 32 years old and already had symptoms of muscle atrophy. The mysterious illness would come to define Sharif’s life. Jafar Tabebordbar could walk when he was in his thirties but stumbled and often lost his balance. Then he lost his ability […]]]>

CAMBRIDGE, Massachusetts – When Sharif Tabebordbar was born in 1986, his father, Jafar, was 32 years old and already had symptoms of muscle atrophy. The mysterious illness would come to define Sharif’s life.

Jafar Tabebordbar could walk when he was in his thirties but stumbled and often lost his balance. Then he lost his ability to drive. When he was 50, he could use his hands. Now he has to support one hand with the other.

No one could answer the question plaguing Sharif and his younger brother, Shayan: What was this disease? And would they develop it like their father did?

Growing up and seeing his father gradually decline, Sharif vowed to solve the mystery and find a cure. His quest led him to a PhD in Developmental and Regenerative Biology, the most competitive ranks in academic medical research, and a discovery, published in September in the journal Cell, which could transform gene therapy – a drug that corrects genetic defects – for almost any muscle wasting disease. This includes muscular dystrophies that affect approximately 100,000 people in the United States, according to the Muscular Dystrophy Association.

Scientists often use a deactivated virus called adeno-associated virus, or AAV, to deliver gene therapy to cells. But damaged muscle cells like the ones plaguing Dr Tabebordbar’s father are difficult to treat. Forty percent of the body is made up of muscles. To transmit the virus to these muscle cells, researchers have to administer huge doses of drugs. Most viruses end up in the liver, damaging it and sometimes killing patients. The trials have been halted, the researchers are blocked.

Dr Tabebordbar has successfully developed viruses that go directly to the muscles – very few end up in the liver. Its discovery could allow treatment with a fraction of the dose, and without the crippling side effects.

Dr Jeffrey Chamberlain, who studies therapies for muscle disease at the University of Washington and is not involved in Dr Tabebordbar’s research, said the new method “could be taken to the next level,” adding that the same The method could also allow researchers to precisely target almost all tissues, including brain cells, which are only beginning to be seen as targets for gene therapy.

And Dr Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health, which helped fund the research, said in a blog post that it holds “potential to target other organs”, “thus potentially providing treatment for a wide range of genetic diseases”.

Dr Tabebordbar’s small office at the Broad Institute has a glass door that opens directly onto his bench. It’s not intimate. There are no photos, no books, no papers strewn on the white counter that serves as a desk. Even the whiteboard is clean. There, fueled by caffeine, he typically works 14 hours a day, except on days he plays football with a group at MIT.

“It’s incredibly productive and incredibly efficient,” said Amy Wagers, who held a PhD from Dr Tabebordbar. Advisor and is Professor and Co-Chair of the Department of Stem Cells and Regenerative Biology at Harvard. “He works all the time and has this incredible passion and incredible dedication. And it’s contagious. It spreads to everyone around it. That’s a real skill – his ability to take a bigger picture and communicate it. “

Dr Tabebordbar and his wife live in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He enjoys cooking Persian dishes and hosts a feast in his tiny apartment every Thanksgiving for a dozen friends. While working on his bench, he listens to Persian music, podcasts or audiobooks. He loves biographies and mentioned a passage he found significant in the autobiography of one of his heroes, England footballer Michael Owen.

Mr Owen writes that when he learned he had been voted European Football Player of the Year in Europe, his reaction was moderate. “All I wanted was to score the next goal, the next hat trick and lift the next trophy,” Owen wrote. “Looking back, I was relentless in this regard and I have no doubt that this mindset was the key to my success.”

“It’s like me,” said Dr Tabebordbar. “It’s amazing that we achieved this goal, but now” – he snaps his fingers – “we have to get down to business.

Dr Tabebordbar was born in Shiraz, Iran, but moved to Rasht when he was 9 years old.

Based on his score on a national test, he was admitted to a high school that is part of the Iranian National Organization for the Development of Outstanding Talent. There, motivated by his willingness to help his father, he focused on the biological sciences. His mother, Tahereh Fallah, who aspired to be a doctor but was unable to continue her education in Iran, pushed Sharif and his brother to excel and celebrated their successes.

After high school, Sharif was determined to be one of eight to ten students in the country admitted to an accelerated program at the University of Tehran. It leads to a bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degree in just nine years.

“It was my dream,” he said. “I had to study really hard for this exam – English, Arabic, Science.” It paid off – he placed sixth out of 1.3 million.

At the University of Tehran, he majored in biotechnology. After four and a half years, he obtained a master’s degree but started applying for a doctorate. programs at top international universities researching muscular dystrophies, hoping it would lead to a discovery that might help her father. It ended up in Dr. Wagers’ lab at Harvard.

All the while, the question hung over him: what caused his father’s illness?

When his father came to Harvard to attend the 2016 graduation ceremony, Dr Tabebordbar took the opportunity to have Jafar’s genes sequenced and uncovered the mystery. No mutation was found.

“How is it possible?” Dr. Tabebordbar asked.

More detailed and sophisticated testing ultimately revealed the answer: Her father suffers from an extraordinarily rare genetic condition, facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy, or FSHD, which affects about four to 10 in 100,000 people. It is not caused by a disease. mutation in a gene. Instead, it’s caused by a mutation in an area between genes, causing a toxic chemical to be excreted that kills muscle cells.

Much to Dr Tabebordbar’s horror, he learned that he had a 50-50 chance of inheriting the mutation from his father. If he had it, he would contract the disease.

He was tested by a friend, who called him with the result.

Dr Tabebordbar had inherited the mutation but, surprisingly, the mutated gene was missing the last piece of toxic DNA, preventing the onset of the disease.

“You are the luckiest of the unlucky guys,” he recalls telling his friend.

In Dr Wagers’ lab, Dr Tabebordbar worked on muscular dystrophy using CRISPR, the gene editing technique. He attempted to use AAV to transport CRISPR enzymes to muscle cells where he could correct the mutation. As others have discovered before him, it was not that simple.

In 2014, Dr Chamberlain of the University of Washington reported that AAV could deliver gene therapy to the muscles of mice. But treatment required “astronomical doses” of the disabled virus, Dr Chamberlain recalled.

“At these very high doses, you are on the verge of other problems,” Dr. Chamberlain said, and the liver is overwhelmed.

Despite the risk associated with high doses of AAV, gene therapy clinical trials are underway for patients with muscle disease, but only in children. Their smaller bodies can cope with lower doses that contain less virus.

Gene therapy with AAV has been approved for a fatal muscle disease, spinal muscular atrophy.

“It’s a horrible disease,” said Dr. Mark Kay, a gene therapy researcher at Stanford. Even with the child-sized doses, some children died from the medicine meant to save them.

“But if you don’t treat them, they will die of the disease,” Dr. Kay said.

Dr. Tabebordbar’s project at Harvard also suffered from high dose issues. Although he was successful in correcting muscular dystrophy in mice – a feat reported at the same time by two other labs – it did not guarantee that gene therapy would work in humans. Different species – even different strains of mice – can have different responses to the same gene therapy. And the AAV doses were dangerously high.

An illness like the one from which Dr Tabebordbar’s father suffers is particularly difficult. The most common muscular dystrophies are caused by a mutation that leaves patients without a particular protein. Gene therapy needs to replenish this protein in some muscle cells, but not all.

The disease afflicting Dr Tabebordbar’s father involves a toxic substance produced by about one percent of muscle cells which then spreads through muscle fibers. To rid the muscles of this toxin, gene therapy must reach every muscle cell.

“It’s a much higher bar,” Dr Tabebordbar said.

After graduating from Harvard, Dr Tabebordbar thought he had the opportunity to develop gene therapy for muscular dystrophy at a biotechnology company. But after about a year, the company called everyone into a conference room to tell them that there was going to be a reorganization and that the muscular dystrophy program was abandoned. Dr Tabebordbar knew he had to go elsewhere.

He got a job in Pardis Sabeti’s lab at the Broad Institute and got to work. His plan was to mutate millions of viruses and isolate those that went almost exclusively to muscle.

The result was what he hoped for – viruses that focused on muscles, in mice and also in monkeys, making them much more likely to work in humans.

As scientists know, most experiments fail before anything succeeds and this work has barely begun.

“I will do 100 experiments and 95 will not work,” said Dr Tabebordbar.

But he said it is the personality that is required of a scientist.

“The mindset I have is, ‘this won’t work’. It makes you very patient.

Dr Chamberlain said that with all of the preclinical work being done by Dr Tabebordbar, the new viruses could move into clinical trials soon, within six months to a year.

Now Dr Tabebordbar has taken his next step. His life, apart from his brief stint in biotechnology, was academic, but he decided he wanted to develop drugs. About a year ago, he co-founded a pharmaceutical company, called Kate Therapeutics, which will focus on gene therapy for muscle disease and settle there for the next phase of his career.

He hopes that his work will save others from suffering. However, the fate of his father weighs on him. Jafar Tabebordbar missed the window when it might still be possible to help him.

“He was born too early,” said his son.


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OncoSec Medical Hosting SITC Key Opinion Leader Webinar on Updated KEYNOTE-695 Study Data https://rogalevich.org/oncosec-medical-hosting-sitc-key-opinion-leader-webinar-on-updated-keynote-695-study-data/ https://rogalevich.org/oncosec-medical-hosting-sitc-key-opinion-leader-webinar-on-updated-keynote-695-study-data/#respond Tue, 02 Nov 2021 12:00:00 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/oncosec-medical-hosting-sitc-key-opinion-leader-webinar-on-updated-keynote-695-study-data/ SITC KOL webinar on November 12 at 7 a.m. ET Pennington, New Jersey and SAN DIEGO, November 2, 2021 / PRNewswire / – OncoSec Medical Incorporated (NASDAQ: ONCS) to host conference call and webcast for investors and analysts on Friday 12 November To 7:00 a.m.ET featuring key opinion leaders (KOLs) Matteo carlino, MD, Westmead and […]]]>

SITC KOL webinar on November 12 at 7 a.m. ET

Pennington, New Jersey and SAN DIEGO, November 2, 2021 / PRNewswire / – OncoSec Medical Incorporated (NASDAQ: ONCS) to host conference call and webcast for investors and analysts on Friday 12 November To 7:00 a.m.ET featuring key opinion leaders (KOLs) Matteo carlino, MD, Westmead and Blacktown Hospitals, Adil daud, MD, from University of California San Francisco, Pablo Fernandez Peñas MD, PhD, FACD, de The University of Sydney, and Montaser Shaheen, MD, from the University of Arizona Cancer center. The KOLs will discuss the clinical relevance of the updated KEYNOTE-695 data presented in a poster at the SITC 2021 annual meeting. Specifically, the KEYNOTE-695 clinical trial recruited patients with metastatic melanoma refractory to blockade. immune checkpoints, non-responders as defined by the recommendations of the Society of Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC).1

Adil daud, MD, professor of medicine at University of California, San Francisco, Director of Clinical Melanoma Research, said: “TAVO works by optimizing cellular uptake of DNA-based IL-12 in the tumor microenvironment, leading to local and sustained production of IL-12 in the tumor, where it matters. TAVO recruits and primers cancer-fighting immune cells in the tumor, resulting in systemic immune responses without systemic toxicity, and we look forward to updated data at SITC 2021 in this highly refractory patient population. “

To register for the event, please click here.

1Kluger HM, Tawbi HA, Ascierto ML et al. Defining tumor resistance to PD-1 pathway blockade: recommendations from the first meeting of the SITC immunotherapy resistance working group. Journal for ImmunoTherapy of Cancer 2020; 8: e000398. doi: 10.1136 / jitc-2019-000398

About OncoSec Medical Incorporated
OncoSec Medical Incorporated (the “Company”, “OncoSec”, “we” or “our”) is a biotechnology company focused on the development of intratumoral cytokine-based immunotherapies. OncoSec’s main investigational product in immunotherapy – TAVO ™ (tavokinogen telseplasmid) – is a DNA plasmid encoding interleukin-12 (IL-12), a naturally occurring protein with immune-stimulating functions, which is administered by intratumoral injection and electroporation. The technology is designed to produce controlled and localized expression of IL-12 in the tumor microenvironment, enabling the activation of a tumor-specific systemic immune response to target and attack tumors throughout the body. OncoSec has built a clinical pipeline using TAVO ™ in combination with checkpoint inhibitors as a potential treatment for multiple cancer indications, with the goal of addressing a large unmet medical need in oncology: disease resistance to treatment with checkpoint inhibitors. The results of clinical studies In clinical studies, TAVO ™, either as monotherapy or in combination with checkpoint inhibitors, demonstrated the induction of a local tumor immune response and a systemic antitumor effect, as well as a acceptable safety profile, justifying further development. In addition to TAVO ™, OncoSec identifies and develops novel DNA-encoded therapeutic candidates and visceral lesion applicator, to target deeper visceral lesions, such as liver, lung or pancreatic lesions. For more information, please visit www.oncosec.com.

TAVO ™ is a trademark of OncoSec Medical Incorporated.

Risk factors and forward-looking statements
This press release, as well as other information provided from time to time by the Company or its employees, may contain forward-looking statements which involve a number of risks and uncertainties which could cause actual results to differ materially from those. anticipated in the declarations. Forward-looking statements provide the Company’s current beliefs, expectations and intentions regarding future events and involve risks, uncertainties (some of which are beyond the control of the Company) and assumptions. For these statements, we claim the safe harbor protection for the forward-looking statements contained in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. You can identify the forward-looking statements by the fact that they do not relate strictly to historical facts or current. These statements may include words such as “anticipate”, “believe”, “might”, “estimate”, “expect”, “intend”, “may”, “” “and” would. And similar expressions (including the negative of these terms). Although we believe that the expectations reflected in forward-looking statements are reasonable, we cannot guarantee future results, levels of activity, performance or achievements. Company intends that these forward-looking statements speak only as of the time they are issued on or as otherwise specified and does not undertake to update or revise these statements as more information becomes available, except as required by federal securities laws and the rules and regulations of the Securities Exchange Commission (“SEC”). In particular, you should be aware that success and the timing of our clinical trials, including the safety and efficacy of our product candidates, the accumulation of patients, unexpected or expected safety events, the impact of COVID-19 on the supply of our candidates or The initiation or completion of clinical trials and the ease of use of the data generated by our trials may differ and not meet our estimated timeframes. Please refer to the risk factors and other caveats provided in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended July 31, 2020 and subsequent periodic and current reports filed with the SEC (each of which can be viewed on the SEC website www.sec.gov), as well as other factors described from time to time in the Company’s filings with the SEC.

Company contact
Investor contact
Mike Moyer
LifeSci Advisors
+ 1-617-308-4306
mmoyer@lifesciadvisors.com

Logo of OncoSec Medical Incorporated (PRNewsfoto / OncoSec Medical Incorporated)

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Perspectum and HepQuant Announce Partnership to Provide Fuller Picture of Liver Health | Business https://rogalevich.org/perspectum-and-hepquant-announce-partnership-to-provide-fuller-picture-of-liver-health-business/ https://rogalevich.org/perspectum-and-hepquant-announce-partnership-to-provide-fuller-picture-of-liver-health-business/#respond Mon, 01 Nov 2021 12:32:24 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/perspectum-and-hepquant-announce-partnership-to-provide-fuller-picture-of-liver-health-business/ SAN FRANCISCO & DENVER – (BUSINESS WIRE) – November 1, 2021– Perspectum and HepQuant are proud to announce a strategic business partnership to provide seamless delivery of HepQuant’s liver function assessment technology through Perspectum’s Contract Research Organization (CRO) services. This press release features multimedia. See the full version here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20211101005151/en/ The collaboration will allow pharmaceutical […]]]>

SAN FRANCISCO & DENVER – (BUSINESS WIRE) – November 1, 2021–

Perspectum and HepQuant are proud to announce a strategic business partnership to provide seamless delivery of HepQuant’s liver function assessment technology through Perspectum’s Contract Research Organization (CRO) services.

This press release features multimedia. See the full version here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20211101005151/en/

The collaboration will allow pharmaceutical companies sponsoring clinical trials in liver disease, including cirrhosis of the liver, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), autoimmune liver disease and liver cancer, to benefit from expertise in imaging and functional testing from Perspectum’s Pharma Solutions. A combined functional analysis and imaging platform could provide the next generation assessment needed to get a complete picture of liver health.

“We are delighted to collaborate with HepQuant,” said Dr Rajarshi Banerjee, CEO of Perspectum. “We have witnessed the unmet need for liver function testing and recognize HepQuant as a leader in the non-invasive functional assessment of the liver. Along with our premier quantitative imaging platform, we believe that collaborating to improve the way we diagnose, treat and monitor chronic liver disease, cirrhosis and liver cancer will best serve the large and growing number. of people suffering from these diseases. “

The partnership will also include the study of the clinical utility of the combination of functional and imaging modalities in potential clinical pathways for the future diagnosis and treatment of liver disease. A comprehensive picture of liver health could be helpful to payers making decisions about coverage for current and future treatments, especially fatty liver and fibrotic disease.

“HepQuant believes that combinations of new non-invasive testing platforms could improve the safety and reliability of patient assessment with liver disease,” said Dr. Gregory T. Everson, Founder and CEO of HepQuant. “Function is a key part of this overall assessment. This functional assessment coupled with Perspectum’s Liver Multi-scan provides a comprehensive picture of liver health with the goal of improving patient management, both in clinical trials and in the clinic.

About Perspectum

Perspectum, a global medical technology company with offices in the UK, US and Singapore, provides cutting-edge digital technologies that help clinicians provide better care for patients with chronic metabolic diseases, multi-pathologies -organic and cancer. With a strong emphasis on precision medicine using advanced imaging and genetics, our vision is to empower patients and clinicians through quantitative health assessments enabling early detection, diagnosis and targeted treatment. With a diverse team of physicians, biomedical scientists, engineers and technologists, Perspectum offers a way to manage complex health issues on a large scale.

For more information, please visit: Perspectum.com, LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter.

About HepQuant

HepQuant, LLC, headquartered in Denver, Colorado, is a privately held diagnostics company. HepQuant products are experimental drug and in vitro diagnostic device combinations and have not yet been evaluated or reviewed by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for commercial sale. They are currently available for experimental use through the FDA guidelines for Investigational Device Exemptions (IDEs).

For more information visit www.hepquant.com.

View source version on businesswire.com:https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20211101005151/en/

CONTACT: For Perspectum Nellie Wild

VP Corporate Affairs

nellie.wild@perspectum.com For HepQuantBradley C. Everson

Director of Business Development

brad.everson@hepquant.com

KEYWORD: CALIFORNIA COLORADO UNITED STATES NORTH AMERICA

INDUSTRY KEYWORD: GENETIC BIOTECHNOLOGY HEALTH ONCOLOGY

SOURCE: Perspective

Copyright Business Wire 2021.

PUB: 01/11/2021 08:30 / DISC: 01/11/2021 08:32

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