alcohol consumption – Rogalevich http://rogalevich.org/ Sat, 26 Mar 2022 12:37:05 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://rogalevich.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.png alcohol consumption – Rogalevich http://rogalevich.org/ 32 32 Liver Health Supplements Market Size, Latest Trends, Research Insights, Key Profile and Applications by 2030 – The Bollywood Ticket https://rogalevich.org/liver-health-supplements-market-size-latest-trends-research-insights-key-profile-and-applications-by-2030-the-bollywood-ticket/ Mon, 14 Mar 2022 06:06:41 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/liver-health-supplements-market-size-latest-trends-research-insights-key-profile-and-applications-by-2030-the-bollywood-ticket/ the global liver health supplements market the size is estimated at 827.24 million USD in 2020 and can reach $1,077.28 million, with a CAGR of 4.5% from 2021 to 2027. The liver is the largest internal organ that typically finds invertebrates, which play a crucial role in removing toxins from the body. Improving the health […]]]>

the global liver health supplements market the size is estimated at 827.24 million USD in 2020 and can reach $1,077.28 million, with a CAGR of 4.5% from 2021 to 2027. The liver is the largest internal organ that typically finds invertebrates, which play a crucial role in removing toxins from the body. Improving the health and well-being of the liver and keeping it functioning properly is a top priority for a healthy body. However, the prevalence of chronic liver diseases has recently increased due to various factors, such as decreasing food quality, increasing alcohol consumption, and many others. As a result, liver health supplements become a preferable option to enhance the smooth and healthy functioning of the liver in the human body.

Growing geriatric population, high incidence of obesity in children and adults, and increasing inclination towards fast food and alcohol consumption will increase the demand for liver health supplements, providing a enormous potential for growth in the global market.

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Factors such as increase in chronic liver diseases including alcoholic liver disease, chronic viral hepatitis, fatty liver disease, liver cancer and hemochromatosis are expected to drive the global growth of supplements market for liver health.

Growing consumer awareness of the need for good liver health coupled with growing government initiatives to promote good health is also fueling the growth of liver health supplements market in health and pharmaceutical sectors across the world.

However, stringent rules and regulations regarding liver health supplements and intense competition among major players may restrain the growth of the global liver health supplements market during the forecast period.

Impact of COVID-19 on Liver Health Supplements Market:

COVID-19 is a global contagious disease that has affected almost every industry, including healthcare and pharmaceuticals. The COVID-19 outbreak has increased the demand for liver health supplements globally, primarily in North America and Asia-Pacific. As the coronavirus crises engulf the world and lead to curfews and shutdowns, it has severely affected many companies operating across the globe, which has directly affected the production and demand for these supplements. This creates many lucrative opportunities for new players and small-scale players to mark their presence in the regional market and offer low prices and high quality products to end users. Therefore, with the outbreak of COVID-19, a significant increase in the demand for these supplements has been observed globally, which has positively impacted the liver health supplements market value in 2020. and the following years.

Report scope

The report outlines the liver health supplements market study based on product, dosage, and end-user.

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On the basis of product, the liver health supplements market has been segmented into –

  • Vitamins and minerals
  • herbal supplements
  • Others

On the basis of dosage, the liver health supplements market has been segmented into –

  • capsules
  • Tablets
  • Liquid
  • Others

Depending on the distribution channel, the market for liver health supplements has been segmented into –

  • Hospital pharmacies
  • Retail pharmacies
  • Online pharmacies

Liver Health Supplements Market: Regional Outlook

Based on region, the global liver health supplements market has been segmented into five key geographical regions namely, North America, Asia-Pacific, Europe, South America, Middle East and Africa. In 2020, North America held the largest market share in the liver health supplements market, followed by Europe and Asia-Pacific, owing to the rise in beverage addiction alcohol abuse and a high prevalence of chronic liver disease in the region. On the contrary, Asia-Pacific is expected to show the highest CAGR during the forecast period, due to people’s increasing awareness of healthy products and increasing disposable income of individuals, as well as the presence growth of online retail platforms for drug supply in the region. .

Leading competitors in Liver Health Supplements Market include-

The market for liver health supplements is highly fragmented, with a large number of small players across the globe. Manufacturers of Vital Liver Health Supplements operating in the global market are-

  • Himalayan Herbal Health Care
  • Natures Craft Switzerland
  • Enzymedica
  • Thompson (Integria Healthcare)
  • Jarrow Formulas, Inc.
  • The bounty of nature
  • Irwin Natural
  • Swanson Health Products
  • NATURALife Health Products, Inc.
  • NOW Food

The Liver Health Supplements Market report provides an in-depth analysis of macroeconomic factors and market attractiveness of each segment. The report will include an in-depth qualitative and quantitative assessment of the industry/regional outlook with the presence of market players in the respective segment and region/country. The information concluded in the report includes the entries.

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Liver Health Supplements Market Report Covers Comprehensive Analysis on:

  • Market Segmentation and Regional Analysis
  • 10 year market size
  • Price analysis
  • Supply and demand analysis
  • Product life cycle analysis
  • Porter’s Five Forces and Value Chain Analysis
  • Analysis of developed and emerging economies
  • PEST analysis
  • Factor analysis of the market and forecasts
  • Opportunities, risks and market trends
  • Conclusion and recommendation
  • Regulatory landscape
  • Patent Analysis
  • Competition landscape
  • More than 15 company profiles

Regional Analysis For Liver Health Supplements Market Includes:

  • North America (United States, Canada, Mexico)
  • South America (Brazil, Argentina, Colombia, Peru, Rest of Latin America)
  • Europe (Germany, Italy, France, United Kingdom, Spain, Poland, Russia, Slovenia, Slovakia, Hungary, Czech Republic, Belgium, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Rest of Europe)
  • Asia-Pacific (China, Japan, India, South Korea, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, Vietnam, Myanmar, Cambodia, Philippines, Singapore, Australia and New Zealand, Rest of Asia-Pacific)
  • The Middle East and Africa (Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, South Africa, North Africa, Rest of MEA

Request for Report Description @ https://www.marketstatsville.com/liver-health-supplements-market

Liver Health Supplements Market: Target Audience

  • Liver Health Supplement Service Providers
  • Hospitals and diagnostic laboratories
  • Drug discovery and development research centers
  • Investors and trading experts
  • Manufacturers, Distributors and Healthcare Providers
  • Trade publications and magazines
  • Government authorities, associations and organizations

About Us:

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We are the leading market research and strategy builder with the depth and breadth of solutions that perfectly meet all your needs. MSG provides solutions across a wide range of industry verticals in market sizing, analytics and incisive business intelligence. MSG’s experienced research analysts are skilled at digging deep and providing a variety of customizable data that helps you make decisions with clarity, confidence, and impact.

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World leaders celebrate liver disease successes and prepare for challenges ahead https://rogalevich.org/world-leaders-celebrate-liver-disease-successes-and-prepare-for-challenges-ahead/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 20:14:45 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/world-leaders-celebrate-liver-disease-successes-and-prepare-for-challenges-ahead/ Yale’s liver program began with a biopsy in October 1947, one of the first liver biopsies ever performed. Gerald Klatskin, MD, founded the Liver Study Unit and developed the techniques that allowed him to perform the biopsy, even designing the biopsy needle. Klatskin, who was David Paige Smith Professor at the Yale School of Medicine […]]]>

Yale’s liver program began with a biopsy in October 1947, one of the first liver biopsies ever performed. Gerald Klatskin, MD, founded the Liver Study Unit and developed the techniques that allowed him to perform the biopsy, even designing the biopsy needle. Klatskin, who was David Paige Smith Professor at the Yale School of Medicine (YSM), was also an amateur photographer. During his career, he assembled about 50,000 Kodachromes from 10,000 liver biopsies, said James L. Boyer, MD, FACEP, who trained with Klatskin in 1969.

Boyer, an associate professor of medicine (digestive diseases) and director emeritus of the Yale Liver Center, recalled how Klatskin recorded his data with a McBee Card Co punch card system. were when they were taken,” Boyer said at a talk celebrating Yale’s liver program.

The Yale Diamond Jubilee, Celebrating 75 years of Academic Hepatology at Yale, was held on February 25. The virtual meeting attracted an international roster of presenters and audience members, many of whom were former or current members of the Liver Program. Nearly 350 people registered for the one-day event. Presenters discussed the program’s global impact, its many successes in diagnosing and treating liver disease, while preparing for the challenges ahead.

The day began with welcoming remarks from Michael H. Nathanson, MD, PhD, Gladys Phillips Crofoot Professor of Medicine (Digestive Diseases) and Professor of Cell Biology, and Director of the Yale Liver Center. The keynote address was delivered by Dean Nancy J. Brown, MD.

The Liver Center is one of only three research centers in the country that focuses entirely on the liver and is sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIH/NIDDK). Now in his 36’sand year of funding, the center has 86 members from 24 YSM departments and sections. Of those, 75% have joint posts with other center members, Nathanson said. The three thematic areas of the center are immunology/inflammation, hepatic metabolism and epithelial biology.

Nathanson pointed to the growing need for liver care in Connecticut. In the past year, one in seven people discharged from Yale New Haven Hospital had a primary or secondary liver diagnosis; The Yale Liver Tumor Committee discussed 619 patients; 2,170 liver-related interventional radiology procedures were performed; and 1,024 liver biopsies were reviewed. Yale has 65 outpatient liver clinics each week, including fatty liver clinics; liver cancer; Gaucher disease and other inherited liver diseases; viral hepatitis; liver transplant; alcohol and addiction in liver disease; and undiagnosed liver disease.

Today, the Yale Liver Center is more diverse than ever, Nathanson said. Of the clinical hepatology faculty members, half are women and more than 20% belong to underrepresented minorities.

One of its pioneering wives, Guadalupe Garcia-Tsao, MD, FRCP, Professor of Medicine (Digestive Diseases) and Chief of Digestive Diseases at VA-CT Hospital in West Haven, discussed groundbreaking hypertension research portal that she conducted with her mentor, Roberto Groszmann, MD. Garcia-Tsao also reported on the VA Hospital’s clinical practice of evaluating all veterans for hepatitis C (HCV) risk factors. The West Haven VA was one of four National Hepatitis C Resource Centers that created and implemented performance measures and initiatives to ensure patients with HCV were diagnosed and treated, a- she declared. Currently, about 90% of veterans with HCV have been treated and cured, she said.

The clinical practice also includes a tele-hepatology clinic that allows West Haven hepatologists to speak to veterans at clinics in central and western Massachusetts. “We can save patients a lot of time that it would take them to travel to us,” she said.

A tumor tracking system, based on radiology reports, was first implemented in West Haven VA, and has been expanded to include many other sites. The system was created by Tamar Taddei, MD, who will succeed Garcia-Tsao as VA Liver Chief beginning in July 2022.

In his presentation, Mario Strazzabosco, MD, PhD, professor of medicine and co-director of the Yale Liver Center, discussed future challenges in the diagnosis and treatment of liver disease. “Despite the tremendous therapeutic advances generated by academic hepatology, liver disease remains a growing global and national healthcare challenge, and the second leading cause of lost working life years,” Strazzabosco said. He urged the medical community to focus on prevention, screening, early diagnosis and therapy. “Clinical guidance in patients with liver disease is always oriented towards advanced disease and its complications, whereas the early and reversible stages of disease are often ignored and overlooked,” he explained. Liver disease results from potentially preventable epidemics of viral hepatitis, alcohol consumption, obesity, diabetes, and inequalities in underserved populations, including lack of health insurance that does not allow for a proper prevention.

Addressing the stigma often associated with liver disease should also be a priority, he added. Fear of being stigmatized causes people to delay or avoid seeing a doctor, and can lead to an increase in unhealthy behaviors as well as social isolation. As a result, more people will have serious liver disease in the future, he said.

As an introduction to subsequent sessions, Strazzabosco showed that liver research at Yale transcends the boundaries of specialties, sections, and departments. He reminded the audience that although improvements in medicine have thus far been driven by specialization, this will not hold in a future where hepatology must adopt models of care geared towards centered liver care. on the patient beyond traditional medical boundaries. The Liver Center can facilitate this transition by ensuring that clinical practice and research remain close, because there is research in health care and health care in research, he said.

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World leaders celebrate liver disease successes and prepare for challenges ahead https://rogalevich.org/world-leaders-celebrate-liver-disease-successes-and-prepare-for-challenges-ahead-2/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 18:55:09 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/world-leaders-celebrate-liver-disease-successes-and-prepare-for-challenges-ahead-2/ Yale’s liver program began with a biopsy in October 1947, one of the first liver biopsies ever performed. Gerald Klatskin, MD, founded the Liver Study Unit and developed the techniques that allowed him to perform the biopsy, even designing the biopsy needle. Klatskin, who was David Paige Smith Professor at the Yale School of Medicine […]]]>

Yale’s liver program began with a biopsy in October 1947, one of the first liver biopsies ever performed. Gerald Klatskin, MD, founded the Liver Study Unit and developed the techniques that allowed him to perform the biopsy, even designing the biopsy needle. Klatskin, who was David Paige Smith Professor at the Yale School of Medicine (YSM), was also an amateur photographer. During his career, he assembled about 50,000 Kodachromes from 10,000 liver biopsies, said James L. Boyer, MD, FACEP, who trained with Klatskin in 1969.

Boyer, an associate professor of medicine (digestive diseases) and director emeritus of the Yale Liver Center, recalled how Klatskin recorded his data with a McBee Card Co punch card system. were when they were taken,” Boyer said at a talk celebrating Yale’s liver program.

The Yale Diamond Jubilee, Celebrating 75 years of Academic Hepatology at Yale, was held on February 25. The virtual meeting attracted an international roster of presenters and audience members, many of whom were former or current members of the Liver Program. Nearly 350 people registered for the one-day event. Presenters discussed the program’s global impact, its many successes in diagnosing and treating liver disease, while preparing for the challenges ahead.

The day began with welcoming remarks from Michael H. Nathanson, MD, PhD, Gladys Phillips Crofoot Professor of Medicine (Digestive Diseases) and Professor of Cell Biology, and Director of the Yale Liver Center. The keynote address was delivered by Dean Nancy J. Brown, MD.

The Liver Center is one of only three research centers in the country that focuses entirely on the liver and is sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIH/NIDDK). Now in his 36’sand year of funding, the center has 86 members from 24 YSM departments and sections. Of those, 75% have joint posts with other center members, Nathanson said. The three thematic areas of the center are immunology/inflammation, hepatic metabolism and epithelial biology.

Nathanson pointed to the growing need for liver care in Connecticut. In the past year, one in seven people discharged from Yale New Haven Hospital had a primary or secondary liver diagnosis; The Yale Liver Tumor Committee discussed 619 patients; 2,170 liver-related interventional radiology procedures were performed; and 1,024 liver biopsies were reviewed. Yale has 65 outpatient liver clinics each week, including fatty liver clinics; liver cancer; Gaucher disease and other inherited liver diseases; viral hepatitis; liver transplant; alcohol and addiction in liver disease; and undiagnosed liver disease.

Today, the Yale Liver Center is more diverse than ever, Nathanson said. Of the clinical hepatology faculty members, half are women and more than 20% belong to underrepresented minorities.

One of its pioneering wives, Guadalupe Garcia-Tsao, MD, FRCP, Professor of Medicine (Digestive Diseases) and Chief of Digestive Diseases at VA-CT Hospital in West Haven, discussed groundbreaking hypertension research portal that she conducted with her mentor, Roberto Groszmann, MD. Garcia-Tsao also reported on the VA Hospital’s clinical practice of evaluating all veterans for hepatitis C (HCV) risk factors. The West Haven VA was one of four National Hepatitis C Resource Centers that created and implemented performance measures and initiatives to ensure patients with HCV were diagnosed and treated, a- she declared. Currently, about 90% of veterans with HCV have been treated and cured, she said.

The clinical practice also includes a tele-hepatology clinic that allows West Haven hepatologists to speak to veterans at clinics in central and western Massachusetts. “We can save patients a lot of time that it would take them to travel to us,” she said.

A tumor tracking system, based on radiology reports, was first implemented in West Haven VA, and has been expanded to include many other sites. The system was created by Tamar Taddei, MD, who will succeed Garcia-Tsao as VA Liver Chief beginning in July 2022.

In his presentation, Mario Strazzabosco, MD, PhD, professor of medicine and co-director of the Yale Liver Center, discussed future challenges in the diagnosis and treatment of liver disease. “Despite the tremendous therapeutic advances generated by academic hepatology, liver disease remains a growing global and national healthcare challenge, and the second leading cause of lost working life years,” Strazzabosco said. He urged the medical community to focus on prevention, screening, early diagnosis and therapy. “Clinical guidance in patients with liver disease is always oriented towards advanced disease and its complications, whereas the early and reversible stages of disease are often ignored and overlooked,” he explained. Liver disease results from potentially preventable epidemics of viral hepatitis, alcohol consumption, obesity, diabetes, and inequalities in underserved populations, including lack of health insurance that does not allow for a proper prevention.

Addressing the stigma often associated with liver disease should also be a priority, he added. Fear of being stigmatized causes people to delay or avoid seeing a doctor, and can lead to an increase in unhealthy behaviors as well as social isolation. As a result, more people will have serious liver disease in the future, he said.

As an introduction to subsequent sessions, Strazzabosco showed that liver research at Yale transcends the boundaries of specialties, sections, and departments. He reminded the audience that although improvements in medicine have thus far been driven by specialization, this will not hold in a future where hepatology must adopt models of care geared towards centered liver care. on the patient beyond traditional medical boundaries. The Liver Center can facilitate this transition by ensuring that clinical practice and research remain close, because there is research in health care and health care in research, he said.

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Long or irregular periods can put a woman’s liver at risk – Consumer Health News https://rogalevich.org/long-or-irregular-periods-can-put-a-womans-liver-at-risk-consumer-health-news/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 12:44:36 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/long-or-irregular-periods-can-put-a-womans-liver-at-risk-consumer-health-news/ FRIDAY, March 4, 2022 (HealthDay News) — According to a new study, women with long or irregular periods are at an increased risk of contracting a serious condition called non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic disease in which excess fat builds up in the liver. It affects about 24% […]]]>

FRIDAY, March 4, 2022 (HealthDay News) — According to a new study, women with long or irregular periods are at an increased risk of contracting a serious condition called non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic disease in which excess fat builds up in the liver. It affects about 24% of American adults, according to the March 3 report in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism.

“The results of our study show that long or irregular menstrual cycles may be associated with an increased risk of developing NAFLD, and this link was not explained by obesity,” said Dr. Seungho Ryu of the Kangbuk Samsung Hospital at Sungkyunkwan University Medical School in Seoul, South Korea.

“Previous studies have shown that long or irregular menstrual cycles are associated with type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, but our study is the first to find a link between long or irregular menstrual cycles and NAFLD,” Ryu noted. in a press release.

NAFLD that is not caused by heavy alcohol consumption may progress to chronic liver damage and is associated with a higher risk of death. There are no approved drugs to treat the condition, so diet and exercise are the standard of care.

For the study, the researchers analyzed data from more than 72,000 women under the age of 40. About 28% of women had long or irregular menstrual cycles and 7% had NAFLD.

After four years of follow-up, new cases of NAFLD had been diagnosed in nearly 9% of women. The researchers concluded that there was an association between long or irregular menstrual cycles in young premenopausal women and an increased risk of NAFLD.

“Young women with long or irregular menstrual cycles may benefit from lifestyle changes to reduce the risk of NAFLD as well as other cardiometabolic diseases,” Ryu concluded.

More information

There’s more on NAFLD at the US National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.

THE SOURCE: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolismpress release, March 3, 2022

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Fatty liver disease: four signs of the disease explained https://rogalevich.org/fatty-liver-disease-four-signs-of-the-disease-explained/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 15:08:11 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/fatty-liver-disease-four-signs-of-the-disease-explained/ Warning signs that suggest you are at risk of developing fatty liver disease. Accumulation of fat in the liver can cause non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a condition seen in overweight or obese people. NAFLD is not caused by alcohol, but if left untreated, it can lead to cirrhosis resembling liver damage caused by excessive […]]]>

Warning signs that suggest you are at risk of developing fatty liver disease.

Accumulation of fat in the liver can cause non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a condition seen in overweight or obese people.

NAFLD is not caused by alcohol, but if left untreated, it can lead to cirrhosis resembling liver damage caused by excessive alcohol consumption.

However, foods and drinks containing alcohol or sugar can make the situation worse, so it is advisable to limit their consumption.

NAFLD is the most common liver disease in the world.

More than 90% of obese people, 60% of diabetics and 20% of people with a healthy weight suffer from this disease.

The human liver normally contains some fat, but when fat exceeds 5% of liver weight, fatty liver can develop.

In the early stages, NAFLD usually has no symptoms, but it can be detected by a liver function test from the blood sample.

The warning signs appear when it progresses to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) or fibrosis in which the liver has become inflamed.

A person with NASH may experience:

  1. extremely tired,
  2. tiredness,
  3. pain in the upper right of the belly on the lower right side of the ribs,
  4. and lose weight for no reason.

Prolonged fibrosis and persistent inflammation will cause cirrhosis where the liver is severely scarred and damaged.

Permanent damage can lead to liver cancer, liver failure, and ultimately death.

Symptoms of cirrhosis can include:

  • itchy skin,
  • edema (swelling of the legs or stomach),
  • and jaundice (the skin and the whites of the eyes turn yellow).

We don’t know how mild fatty liver disease develops into serious disease such as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and liver fibrosis.

To understand the process, the researchers performed a genetic analysis of hepatocytes, the main functional cells of the liver.

Professor Stephan Herzig, co-author of the study, said:

“Understanding the mechanism by which this condition becomes fatal is essential in our quest to find therapeutic solutions and preventive measures.”

The research team developed a method targeting particular nodes of the protein network to halt disease progression or even prevent fibrosis.

A network of proteins called “transcription factors” is involved in the process of hepatocyte reprogramming.

Failure of the process could lead to dysfunction of hepatocyte cells.

For example, during the development of NASH, hepatocyte cells lose their identity.

Dr Ana Alfaro, the first author of the study, said:

“These findings are important because they unravel the cellular mechanisms underlying non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.

Knowing the role of protein networks and the loss of hepatocyte identity gives us potential intervention targets for the development of effective therapies.

The study was published in the journal Cell metabolism (Loft et al., 2021).

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Women with irregular periods may be at risk for liver disease https://rogalevich.org/women-with-irregular-periods-may-be-at-risk-for-liver-disease/ Tue, 01 Mar 2022 14:00:00 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/women-with-irregular-periods-may-be-at-risk-for-liver-disease/ News – WASHINGTON –Women with long or irregular periods are known to have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes and heart disease, but researchers have found that these women may also be at risk for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), according to a study. new study published in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical […]]]>

News – WASHINGTON –Women with long or irregular periods are known to have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes and heart disease, but researchers have found that these women may also be at risk for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), according to a study. new study published in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism.

About 24% of American adults have NAFLD, a chronic disease in which excess fat builds up in the liver. This fat accumulation is not caused by heavy alcohol consumption. NAFLD can progress to chronic liver damage and is associated with a higher risk of death. Diet and exercise are the standard of care for NAFLD because no drugs have been approved to treat the disease.

“The results of our study show that long or irregular menstrual cycles may be associated with an increased risk of developing NAFLD, and this link was not explained by obesity,” said Seungho Ryu, MD, Ph. D., from the Center for Cohort Studies, Total Healthcare Center, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine in Seoul, South Korea. “Previous studies have shown that long or irregular menstrual cycles are associated with type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, but our study is the first to find a link between long or irregular menstrual cycles and NAFLD.”

The researchers studied a dataset of 72,092 women under the age of 40. About 28% of these women had long or irregular menstrual cycles and 7% had NAFLD. Researchers followed up four years later and found that new cases of NAFLD occurred in nearly 9% of women. The researchers concluded that there was an association between long or irregular menstrual cycles in young premenopausal women and an increased risk of NAFLD.

“Young women with long or irregular menstrual cycles may benefit from lifestyle changes to reduce the risk of NAFLD as well as other cardiometabolic diseases,” Ryu said.

Other authors of this study include: In Young Cho, Yoosoo Chang, Jae-Heon Kang, Yejin Kim, Eunju Sung, and Hocheol Shin of Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine in Seoul, South Korea; Sarah Wild from the University of Edinburgh in Edinburgh, UK; and Christopher Byrne of the University of Southampton and University Hospital of Southampton in Southampton, UK

The study received funding from Sungkyunkwan University and the NIHR Center for Biomedical Research in Southampton.

The manuscript, “Long or Irregular Menstrual Cycles and Risk of Prevalent and Incident Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease”, was published online, ahead of print.

# # #

Endocrinologists are at the heart of solving the most pressing health issues of our time, from diabetes and obesity to infertility, bone health and hormone-related cancers. The Endocrine Society is the world’s oldest and largest organization of scientists dedicated to hormone research and physicians who care for people with hormone-related diseases.

The Society has more than 18,000 members, including scientists, doctors, educators, nurses and students in 122 countries. To learn more about the Society and the field of endocrinology, visit our site atwww.endocrine.org. Follow us on Twitter at @TheEndoSociety and @EndoMedia.

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Liver Disease: Stages, Symptoms, Lifestyle Changes to Adapt and Prevent It | Health https://rogalevich.org/liver-disease-stages-symptoms-lifestyle-changes-to-adapt-and-prevent-it-health/ Mon, 28 Feb 2022 07:54:06 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/liver-disease-stages-symptoms-lifestyle-changes-to-adapt-and-prevent-it-health/ In addition to removing toxins and other chemical wastes from the blood, the liver is also responsible for continuously filtering the blood circulating through the body and converting nutrients and drugs absorbed through the digestive tract into chemicals ready for use. ‘use. The liver is one of the largest and most extraordinary organs in the […]]]>

In addition to removing toxins and other chemical wastes from the blood, the liver is also responsible for continuously filtering the blood circulating through the body and converting nutrients and drugs absorbed through the digestive tract into chemicals ready for use. ‘use. The liver is one of the largest and most extraordinary organs in the body because it is a super organ that performs countless health functions while all other organs have specific or limited functions.

So far, more than 500 functions have been attributed to the liver, and scientists say more may be discovered over time. The most important function of the liver is the processing of everything we consume, be it food, alcohol, drugs or poisons and the liver is damaged by all the toxins we consume. Blood infections also reach the liver and inflict damage while many other disease processes, inflammations and diseases including cancer in other organs also target the liver.

Symptoms:

In an interview with HT Lifestyle, Dr. Gaurav Chaubal, Program Director of Liver, Pancreas and Bowel Transplantation and HPB Surgery at Global Hospital, Parel, Mumbai, listed the possible symptoms one should not never avoid. They understand:

1. Yellowing of the skin and eyeballs (jaundice)

2. Pain in the upper right part of the abdomen.

3. Abdominal swelling (ascites)

4. Nausea.

5. A general feeling of unease (malaise)

6. Disorientation or confusion. (hepatic encephalopathy)

7. Drowsiness.

5 stages of liver disease:

Explaining that fatty liver disease is an accumulation of fat in the liver that can damage the liver and gradually progress to liver failure, Dr. Sulaiman Ladhani, Consultant Doctor of Thoracology and MD Chest and Tuberculosis at Masina Hospital, Byculla, Mumbai, explained: “It can be due to either excessive alcohol consumption or non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. It mainly occurs in overweight or obese people. Diabetic patients are at greater risk of having fatty liver disease.

He added: “Fatty liver is the result of abnormal merabolism and excess calories, fat taken in from food which is transported to the liver and eventually stored in the liver as fat. There are no symptoms of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which is why it is called a silent disease. It is usually identified by coincidence during an ultrasound or a fibroscan.

Dr. Sulaiman Ladhani and Dr. Gaurav Chaubal talked about the different stages of liver disease or fatty liver disease. They are:

Stage 1. Simple foie gras – This happens when the liver begins to accumulate fat. There is no inflammation or scarring in the liver at this stage. There are no symptoms in the early stage. Thus, many people are unaware that they have a fatty liver. For many people, fatty liver disease does not progress with an unhealthy liver. With a healthy diet and regular physical activity, excess fat in the liver can be reduced. It is observed that about 10 to 20% of people with this simple fatty liver disease will go on to the next stage.

Stage 2: Inflammation – Hepatitis steato occurs when the accumulation of fat in liver cells is accompanied by a certain amount of inflammation. It affects approximately 5% of the population. If the amount of damaged tissue increases, the liver may eventually struggle to repair it fast enough. During this phase, ongoing damage to liver cells from a number of agents and diseases causes the liver to enlarge, and the person experiences abdominal pain in the upper right corner. During this stage, the condition may be treatable. However, in people with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, there may not be significant symptoms.

Stage 3: Fibrosis/Scarring – If the inflammation seen in Stage 1 is not controlled, liver tissue slowly begins to heal and scarred tissue begins to replace healthy liver tissue. The condition is called fibrosis. Here there is persistent scar tissue in the liver and in the blood vessels around the liver. The liver can still function quite well at this stage, and removing or treating the cause of the inflammation can prevent further progression or reverse some of the damage. However, if scar tissue begins to replace much of the normal tissue, liver function gradually begins to be affected. During this phase, proper medications and lifestyle changes can reverse the condition to some degree.

Stage 4: Cirrhosis of the liver – At this point the healing is complete and there is no possibility of the liver healing itself now. At this point the liver stops working properly and symptoms include jaundice where the eyes and fingernails start to turn yellow, a dull ache in the lower part of the ribs, or abdominal distension due to fluid buildup in the belly. The person begins to lose appetite, weight loss occurs, and other organs may be affected such as the kidneys, brain, and heart. Scar tissue in cirrhosis is difficult to remove, although further progression can be halted if the positive agent is removed. Most people have an early stage of the disease which is simple fatty liver disease or steato. Only a small number move on to the next steps.

Stage 5: End-stage liver disease (ESLD) – Liver failure is of 2 types – acute liver failure occurs quickly with a duration of 48-72 hours and is usually caused by reasons other than alcohol, while chronic liver failure takes a long time to develop. happen and is often caused by alcohol abuse, uncontrolled diabetes, hypertension or obesity. Other more common reasons are viral hepatitis, autoimmune diseases and certain metabolic diseases. Cognitive or mental health is also affected and the person often feels confused or disoriented. ESLD is usually fatal.

Stage 6: Liver cancerThis results in liver cancer which can occur at any time in the liver and for reasons other than liver disease (primary liver cancer). It can also develop during any of the 4 stages above and is not necessarily the last in the sequence. Just like ESLD, liver cancer is also fatal unless the tumor is removed, resected, or a liver transplant is performed.

Everything you need to know about liver transplantation:

Dr Gaurav Chaubal said: “Overall, a liver transplant is needed in three scenarios. First, when cirrhosis of the liver progresses and symptoms worsen despite medical treatment. Second, when other organs also begin to be involved due to cirrhosis, namely the brain, kidneys, and coagulation. Third, when liver cancer develops against the background of cirrhosis of the liver.

Dr. Akash Shukla, Director of Hepatology at Sir HN Reliance Foundation Hospital, revealed that after liver transplantation, there are 3 things that can affect long-term results and therefore need to be taken care of. He pointed out: “First, the drugs used to prevent rejection and make sure the body accepts the liver, these are called immunosuppressive drugs, initially there are 3 drugs and they gradually reduce to one drug per day beyond 1 year from transplant, but this one pill should be continued indefinitely. There is no restriction on how long the new liver will last, if proper medications are taken. It can last a very long time.”

He added: ‘The second important precaution a person should take is to prevent infection. The risk of infection is highest during the first 3 months, and during this period one should avoid unnecessary contact with people, live in a hygienic environment and eat well-cooked or very clean food. However, there is no need for complete isolation, and normal life activities can be continued, beyond 3 months the risk of infection drops significantly and is generally not a problem unless there is major exposure to infectious microbes.

The third point to consider, according to Dr. Akash Shukla, is to take care of the other organs of the body. He pointed out, “Although the liver is doing very well, in the long term we need to take care of other organs in the body and important metabolic fictions like controlling diabetes, blood pressure and ischemic heart disease by changing the mode living in a healthy lifestyle. lifestyle and nutritious diet. In addition, we must be extremely vigilant about the development of cancers in people who have received an organ transplant and for this, a regular visit to the doctor and screening for cancers, in particular head and neck cancers and skin cancers, are extremely important for the longevity of people after transplants.

Tips for preventing liver disease:

According to Dr. Sulaiman Ladhani, all stages of the liver are associated with an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease such as heart attack and stroke before liver failure occurs. Therefore, maintaining a healthy diet and limiting sugar intake, quitting smoking and alcohol consumption, and exercising will help in the long run.

He advised: “Vitamin E is useful in preventing further progression. It is very important to have more clarity on this subject. Diet modification and calorie reduction, avoiding fast foods, carbonated drinks and heavy meals should be done. Having healthy meals and increasing the physical movement of the body as advised by the doctor is imperative. Regular liver tests and appropriate medications are essential. The progression of the disease is slow, therefore, the lifestyle is managed with proper diet as this can help prevent the disease from progressing further.

Echoing the same, Dr Gaurav Chaubal suggested: “Making small changes to your lifestyle and eating habits, such as – starting your day off right by eating a healthy breakfast, reducing salt and fat intake, avoiding too many processed or junk foods, detoxifying your system by taking plenty of fluids, indulging in healthy snacks including plenty of fruits and vegetables in your diet, avoiding excessive alcohol consumption and daily exercise are some of the ways to prevent liver disease.

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No recurring AIP attacks with Givlaari, small real-life study reports https://rogalevich.org/no-recurring-aip-attacks-with-givlaari-small-real-life-study-reports/ Wed, 16 Feb 2022 22:02:54 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/no-recurring-aip-attacks-with-givlaari-small-real-life-study-reports/ Almost all people with severe and recurrent acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) were free of symptomatic attacks after treatment with Givlaari (givosiran), a small real-world study has shown. Givlaari “significantly reduced the attack rate in our cohort, as 96% were attack-free at the time of the study,” the researchers wrote. Early treatment resulted in significantly better […]]]>

Almost all people with severe and recurrent acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) were free of symptomatic attacks after treatment with Givlaari (givosiran), a small real-world study has shown.

Givlaari “significantly reduced the attack rate in our cohort, as 96% were attack-free at the time of the study,” the researchers wrote.

Early treatment resulted in significantly better responses, allowing dosage reduction in some patients.

However, the study also confirmed the high prevalence of adverse events,”most of which are benign but can affect the patient’s quality of life, such as feveroften reported fatigue and nausea,” the team wrote.

Thus, they suggested that the The impact of Givlaari on urinary heme metabolites should be monitored monthly to allow for dose adjustments and an individual approach to treatment.

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The study, “Givosiran in acute intermittent porphyria: a personalized medicine approachwas published in the journal Molecular genetics and metabolism.

AIP is caused by a genetically inherited deficiency in HMBS, an enzyme that helps produce heme, a molecule essential for transporting oxygen in the body.

Although most people with HMBS mutations do not develop symptoms, acute attacks can occur due to activation of a related enzyme called ALAS1. It can be triggered by hormonal changes, infections, alcohol consumption, smoking, reduced calorie intake, and stress.

Activated ALAS1 leads to the accumulation of two heme precursors – delta-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and porphobilinogen (PBG) – in the liver, triggering symptoms such as abdominal pain with nausea and vomiting. and, in severe cases, convulsions, states of confusion and hallucinations.

Most patients will experience one or a few attacks in their lifetime, but less than 10% will develop recurrent symptoms. AIP patients and mutation carriers are also known to be at increased risk of developing high blood pressure and kidney and liver disease.

Givlaari, a therapy developed by Alnylam Pharmaceuticals and designed to suppress ALAS1, was recently approved for porphyrias that affect the liver, including AIP. In clinical trials, patients treated with monthly subcutaneous (under the skin) injections had significantly fewer acute attacks and lower levels of ALA and PBG in urine.

In this report, researchers from the University of Paris, together with collaborators from various sites across France, described the impact of Givlaari in 24 AIP patients, in whom the dosing frequency was adjusted according to the levels individual ALAs throughout their treatment.

“We decided to evaluate a personalized medicine approach based on each patient’s ALA level and follow up individually,” the team wrote.

Patients eligible for AIP experienced four or more attacks per year and/or were treated with heme arginate, a drug that suppresses porphyrin production, as a preventive measure. They initially received 2.5 mg/kg of Givlaari every month, regardless of early response, and were treated and followed for a median of 16 months (one year, three months).

At the time of analysis, Givlaari produced a sustained overall reduction in urinary ALA levels, which fell by a median of 89.9%. Notably, 23 of the 24 participants (95.8%) did not experience an acute attack.

Prior to treatment, urinary ALA levels ranged from 7.9 to 51.4 micromoles per millimole (mcmol/mmol) of creatinine, well above the normal maximum of 3 mcmol/mmol of creatinine. It should be noted that ALA values ​​are normalized to creatinine concentrations to account for differences in urine volume.

After treatment with Givlaari, 20 patients (83%) consistently had creatinine below 5 mcmol/mmol, and of these some measurements were below 3 mcmol/mmol creatinine. The other four individuals showed a moderate decrease in ALA levels.

One participant (patient 9) showed a limited (78.1%) and variable decrease in ALA, which never fell below 5 mcmol/mmol creatinine. She had regular attacks requiring heme arginate every four or six weeks and was given opioids to manage her daily abdominal pain. Three other patients with a partial response – a 51.5% to 76.9% drop in ALA levels – no longer had acute attacks.

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Givlaari |  News Porphyria |  illustration of a graph

Statistical analysis showed a significant positive association between the year of AIP onset and the reduction in ALA percentage, demonstrating that “treatment efficacy was better in patients whose disease course was the shortest,” the researchers wrote.

Clinicians adjusted the frequency of Givlaari administration based on monthly ALA measurements, which led to two distinct groups of patients: 14 (58%), who required Givlaari every three months or more frequently , due to moderate or unstable declines in ALA levels; and 10 (42%) who were treated less frequently and maintained low ALA levels.

“The heterogeneity [variability] individual responses over time strongly supports that personalized therapeutic adaptation is necessary,” the researchers wrote.

Among those who required more frequent treatment, there was either a moderate decrease in ALA or a rapid increase after starting Givlaari. There was an overall 82.8% drop in ALA levels on treatment in this group, with an average ALA level of 5.6 mcmol/mmol. Six of these patients were treated every two to three months, while eight received treatment every four to six weeks.

Patients treated less frequently had an overall reduction of 95.6% in ALA levels, which remained at an average of 1.4 mcmol/mmol. Dosing frequency ranged from four to 14 months (median 7.5 months), which was only expected when ALA levels increased. These people did not experience acute symptoms on Givlaari.

A higher injection frequency was more likely in those who had acute symptoms for a longer period. Consistently, there was a significant difference in the mean number of years since disease onset between patients requiring less or more frequent treatments (6.7 vs 19.6 years).

All participants reported at least one adverse event. Elevated ALT levels, a sign of liver damage, were documented in eight patients (32%), occurring within the first six months of treatment in all but one case. Fatigue was felt in 17 (68%), nausea in 10 (40%), and six (24%) had increased hair loss and/or spontaneous nail loss.

A moderate and short-lasting increase in blood creatinine levels, a sign of impaired renal function, was observed in 91% of patients. High levels of homocysteine, which can damage blood vessels, were present in all 23 patients with measurements. Homocysteine ​​levels tended to increase with treatment (median increase 305%).

One patient experienced a serious adverse event leading to study discontinuation after four months due to acute pancreatitis, a sudden inflammation of the pancreas. Another patient was interrupted for 2.5 months due to a marked increase in pancreatitis markers and then resumed at a lower dose without relapse. Other serious adverse events included elevated liver enzyme levels, pulmonary embolism and decline in kidney function.

“In our cohort under [Givlaari] treatment, all but one (95.8%) severe AIP patients, defined as 4 or more acute attacks per year or requiring heme arginate prophylaxis, were acute attack free,” the authors wrote. . “The long-lasting treatment effect in some patients allowed us to reduce the frequency of administration under close monitoring of heme precursor levels without reduction in biological or clinical efficacy.”

“Early treatment with [Givlaari] was associated with a better biological response and allowed us to decrease dosing frequency,” they wrote.

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VCU Receives $104 Million Donation to Support New Liver Health Institute | Education https://rogalevich.org/vcu-receives-104-million-donation-to-support-new-liver-health-institute-education/ Tue, 15 Feb 2022 16:30:00 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/vcu-receives-104-million-donation-to-support-new-liver-health-institute-education/ Virginia Commonwealth University has received a $104 million pledge to support its new Liver Health Institute. It is the largest individual donation in the history of the university. Dr. R. Todd Stravitz, former director of liver transplantation — and grandson of the founder of the Boar’s Head deli company — will make the donation. Liver […]]]>

Virginia Commonwealth University has received a $104 million pledge to support its new Liver Health Institute. It is the largest individual donation in the history of the university.

Dr. R. Todd Stravitz, former director of liver transplantation — and grandson of the founder of the Boar’s Head deli company — will make the donation. Liver disease specialist Dr. Arun Sanyal will lead the initiative.

The university will call it the Stravitz-Sanyal Institute for Liver Disease and Metabolic Health at VCU, and its work will include research, education, and clinical care.

VCU President Michael Rao called it “a tectonic shift in VCU’s journey”.

The money comes from the Barbara Brunckhorst Foundation, a charitable fund established in 1969 by Frank Brunckhorst, the founder of Boar’s Head. Stravitz’s mother, Barbara Brunckhorst, died in 2020 and left her estate to the foundation.

Stravitz has worked at VCU Health for about 30 years and says his liver research is among the best in the country.

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He originally committed $50 million plus an additional $4 million to staff two president positions. Then he added another $5 million a year for 10 years, for a total of $104 million, paid over 13 years.

It is the second-largest donation ever publicly shared for a Virginia college, VCU said. In 2019, the University of Virginia received $120 million to establish a data science school.

Stravitz, 61, retired in 2020 to care for his mother but intends to return part-time.

“I miss clinical medicine,” he said.

The donation will expand VCU’s ability to study data analysis related to liver health; bacteria in the intestine and its impact on the body; liver imaging; gene editing in liver cells and patient health globally. VCU announced the launch of the institute in December.

Liver disease accounts for about 2% of deaths in the United States, making it roughly the 10th leading cause of death. That’s a growing number, Sanyal said, as alcohol consumption has increased during the pandemic.

But it’s a misconception that alcoholism is the only cause, he says. Obesity and diabetes are also contributing factors, and some of them are unexplainable. When excess fat builds up in the liver, it can cause scarring, cirrhosis, and cancer.

By the time a patient has cirrhosis, there aren’t many treatment options. These patients often spend a long time in hospital and rack up big bills, but struggle to prolong their lives. Liver transplants are the most common remedy, but transplants are “not a public health solution”, Sanyal said.

There were more than 9,000 liver transplants in the United States in 2021, according to the Richmond-based United Network for Organ Sharing. But more and more people are waiting for transplants, and many never receive them. The number of people with liver disease is expected to increase, while the number of available organs will remain relatively stable.

“Liver disease is becoming an important public health problem,” Sanyal said.

Liver disease research is poised to make huge strides, Stravitz said. The institute will focus on liver disease as a public health issue, the role of the liver in body metabolism, and the professional development of liver researchers. And it will bring together researchers from many departments, including transplant surgery, hepatology, microbiology, pharmacology and addiction medicine.

It is undetermined whether the institute will get a new building; eventually, it will have its own dedicated space. Current staff are located in a number of different buildings on the MCV campus.

Sanyal plans to hire 30 to 60 new employees, more than doubling the existing workforce.

ekolenich@timesdispatch.com

(804) 649-6109

Twitter: @EricKolenich

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Discovery paves way for design of new treatment for alcohol-related liver disease https://rogalevich.org/discovery-paves-way-for-design-of-new-treatment-for-alcohol-related-liver-disease/ Mon, 14 Feb 2022 21:54:19 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/discovery-paves-way-for-design-of-new-treatment-for-alcohol-related-liver-disease/ Cedars-Sinai researchers have discovered a new pathway that helps explain how excessive alcohol consumption causes liver damage, specifically mitochondrial dysfunction in alcohol-associated liver disease. The discovery, published in the peer-reviewed journal Nature Communicationmay also contribute to a new therapeutic approach for people with the disease. Cases of alcohol-related liver disease continue to rise and are […]]]>

Cedars-Sinai researchers have discovered a new pathway that helps explain how excessive alcohol consumption causes liver damage, specifically mitochondrial dysfunction in alcohol-associated liver disease.

The discovery, published in the peer-reviewed journal Nature Communicationmay also contribute to a new therapeutic approach for people with the disease.

Cases of alcohol-related liver disease continue to rise and are one of the leading causes of alcohol-related death. The spectrum of disease includes hepatitis, fibrosis to cirrhosis, and liver cancer. Cirrhosis alone causes 1.6 million deaths worldwide and more than 50% of cases are due to alcohol abuse. Other than abstinence, there is currently no effective therapy to treat people with the disease.

“Alcohol-associated liver disease is a major problem worldwide,” said Shelly C. Lu, MD, director of the Karsh Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology in the Department of Medicine and lead study author. . “We’ve known for a long time that alcohol somehow damages mitochondria, but until now the mechanisms by which this damage occurs has been unclear.”

The liver is very rich in mitochondria, known as the powerhouse of all cells, and plays a vital role in liver function. Alcohol, however, can alter the structure and function of mitochondria, leading to liver damage.

To better understand the mechanisms of mitochondrial damage in alcohol-related liver disease, Lu and his team examined the role of an enzyme called MAT?1 that is responsible for supplying the liver with vital nutrients for survival.

Using liver tissue from patients with alcohol-associated liver disease and preclinical models, the team found that levels of this enzyme were selectively reduced in mitochondria.

“Once we saw MAT?1 depletion, we needed to figure out what was causing it to happen,” said Lucia Barbier-Torres, PhD, postdoctoral scientist at the Lu lab and first author of the study.

The team found that alcohol activates protein casein kinase 2 (CK2), which triggers a process called phosphorylation of MAT?1 at a specific amino acid residue. In their experiments, the team found that this process facilitates an interaction between MAT?1 with another protein called PIN1 and prevents MAT?1 from being transported into the mitochondria.

“Once this interaction occurs, MAT?1 cannot enter the mitochondria to deliver the essential nutrient and instead degrades,” Barbier-Torres said.

With this information, the team decided to block this interaction by turning off MAT?1, thereby preventing phosphorylation from occurring. This prevented the interaction of the two proteins, preserving the location and function of mitochondrial MAT?1 in the mitochondria and thus protecting the mitochondria from being damaged by alcohol consumption. They observed the same protection when they reduced CK2 expression to lower MATß1 phosphorylation.

“Our findings support a new, targetable mechanism to help treat alcohol-associated liver disease,” said Lu, who is also a professor of medicine and the Women’s Guild Chair of Gastroenterology.

The next steps in this line of research for Lu and his team include the development of small molecule therapeutics that can interfere with the interaction between MAT?1 and PIN1, which should protect mitochondria from alcohol-induced damage.

Other Cedars-Sinai co-authors include Ben Murray, Jin Won Yang, Jiaohong Wang, Michitaka Matsuda, Wei Fan, Nirmala Mavila, Hui Peng, Komal Ramani, Ekihiro Seki, and Jennifer Van Eyk.

Funding: The research was supported by the National Institutes of Health under award numbers R01AA026759 and R01DK123763.

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