carcinoma hcc – Rogalevich http://rogalevich.org/ Sat, 26 Mar 2022 12:35:37 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://rogalevich.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.png carcinoma hcc – Rogalevich http://rogalevich.org/ 32 32 Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) related to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease differs clinically from HCC due to other causes https://rogalevich.org/hepatocellular-carcinoma-hcc-related-to-non-alcoholic-fatty-liver-disease-differs-clinically-from-hcc-due-to-other-causes/ Tue, 15 Mar 2022 07:26:38 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/hepatocellular-carcinoma-hcc-related-to-non-alcoholic-fatty-liver-disease-differs-clinically-from-hcc-due-to-other-causes/ 1. Patients with NAFLD-related HCC have longer disease-free survival than those with HCC from other causes. 2. Tumors from patients with HCC related to NAFLD were often larger in diameter than patients with HCC from other causes. Level of evidence assessment: 1 (Excellent) Summary of the study: This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to compare […]]]>

1. Patients with NAFLD-related HCC have longer disease-free survival than those with HCC from other causes.

2. Tumors from patients with HCC related to NAFLD were often larger in diameter than patients with HCC from other causes.

Level of evidence assessment: 1 (Excellent)

Summary of the study: This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to compare the clinical presentation and outcome of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) due to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) with HCC from other causes. Outcome measures of interest included: proportion of HCC secondary to NAFLD as well as a comparison of patient and tumor characteristics, overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival outcomes, and other measures between NAFLD-related HCC and HCC due to other causes. The proportion of HCC secondary to NAFLD was 15.1% and an increasing trend over time was noted. Patients who had HCC due to NAFLD were older with higher BMI and had a higher likelihood of comorbidities, including diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, or cardiovascular disease, compared to patients with HCC due to other causes. Patients with NAFLD-related HCC also had a higher likelihood of being non-cirrhotic. The tumors of patients with HCC due to NAFLD were larger in diameter and these patients had a higher likelihood of uninodular lesions. OS results did not differ between patients with HCC due to NAFLD and those with HCC from other causes, but disease-free survival was longer in patients with HCC due to NAFLD. Limitations of this study include those intrinsic to the meta-analyses, the exclusion of pediatric populations, and a smaller number of studies from the Southeast Asian and South American regions. Overall, the proportion of HCCs linked to NAFLD is increasing over time and an increase in surveillance strategies would be valuable for high-risk patients with NAFLD.

Click to read the study in The Lancet Oncology

Relevant reading: Hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

In depth [systematic review and meta-analysis]: This systematic review and meta-analysis included 94,636 patients in 61 studies from many countries completed between January 1980 and May 2021. The proportion of HCC secondary to NAFLD was 15.1% (95% confidence interval (CI) , 11.9%-18.9%). Patients with HCC due to NAFLD had higher BMI (mean difference 2.99 kg/m^2, 95% CI 2.20 – 3.78 kg/m^2) and were older ( mean difference 5.62 years, 95% CI 4.63 – 6.61 years). Patients with NAFLD-related HCC had a higher likelihood of comorbidities, including diabetes (odds ratio (OR) 4.31, 95% CI 3.19, 5.80), hypertension (OR 2.84, 95% CI, 2.09 – 3.86), hyperlipidemia (OR 3.43, 95% CI, 2.39 – 4.95) or cardiovascular disease (OR 2.23, 95% CI, 1.43, 3.48) compared to patients with HCC due to other causes. Patients with NAFLD-related HCC also had a higher probability of being non-cirrhotic: 38.5% (95% CI, 27.9% – 50.2%) versus 14.6% (CI at 95%, 8.7% – 23.4%). NAFLD HCC patients often had larger diameter tumors (mean difference 0.67 cm, 95% CI 0.35 to 0.98 cm) and more often uninodular lesions (OR 1.36; CI at 95%, 1.19 to 1.56). Comparison of OS results revealed that there was no difference between the groups (risk ratio (HR) 1.05; 95% CI, 0.92, 1.20). However, patients with NAFLD-related HCC had increased disease-free survival (HR 0.79; 95%, 0.63-0.99).

Picture: PD

©2022 2 Minute Medicine, Inc. All rights reserved. No work may be reproduced without the express written consent of 2 Minute Medicine, Inc. Learn about licensing here. No article should be construed as medical advice and is not intended as such by the authors or by 2 Minute Medicine, Inc.

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Positive results in the early detection of liver cancer https://rogalevich.org/positive-results-in-the-early-detection-of-liver-cancer/ Tue, 08 Mar 2022 02:21:21 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/positive-results-in-the-early-detection-of-liver-cancer/ Helio Health, an AI-driven healthcare company focused on commercializing tests for early detection of cancer from a simple blood draw, today announced that Hepatology Communications has released positive results from the ENCORE study validating the strong clinical performance of HelioLiver in detecting the presence of early hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common form of liver […]]]>

Helio Health, an AI-driven healthcare company focused on commercializing tests for early detection of cancer from a simple blood draw, today announced that Hepatology Communications has released positive results from the ENCORE study validating the strong clinical performance of HelioLiver in detecting the presence of early hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common form of liver cancer and the seventh most common cancer in the world, but the second in terms of cancer-related mortality, often due to late diagnosis.1 In this prospective, multicenter, blinded phase 2 study, HelioLiver demonstrated high specificity %) and high sensitivity (76%) in detecting the Early-stage HCC (stage I and II), significantly outperforming other clinically available detection tools such as AFP (57%), GALAD (65%) and ultrasound (47%). 2,3 Considering HCC as a whole, HelioLiver performed at 85% sensitivity with the same specificity of 91%.2

Diagnostic tests for HCC Early Stage Susceptibility (I + II) Overall Sensitivity
HelioLiver2 76% 85%
PFA (≥ 20 ng/mL)2 57% 62%
GALAD score (≥ -0.63)2 65% 75%
Ultrasound3 47% 84%
Note: Table shows HelioLiver sensitivities at 91% specificity2
2 Lin N, et al. 2021.
3 Tzartzeva K, et al. 2018.

Helio has developed its next-generation sequencing platform, ECLIPSETM, to identify 77 methylation targets across 28 genes. These DNA markers work in combination with serum HCC proteins AFP, AFP-L3% and DCP to enhance the multi-analyte algorithm.

• The area under receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) for HelioLiver was 0.944, demonstrating significantly better predictive ability than the other tests.

• At a fixed specificity of 87.5%, HelioLiver achieved 87% sensitivity for early stage HCC and 90% overall sensitivity.

• 10 of the 28 genes used in the HelioLiver assay were found to be directly involved in molecular pathways known to be involved in the pathogenesis of HCC while only one of the 497 genes studied but not selected met the same criteria, suggesting that the markers in HelioLiver are more biologically relevant than tests that use these other genes.

Hepatology Communications is the official open access, peer-reviewed journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD), dedicated to the rapid dissemination of high-quality research in hepatology. AASLD is the most respected medical guidelines organization for liver disease in the United States.

HelioLiver is being further evaluated in Helio’s prospective pivotal biomarker study, CLiMB (NCT03694600), where test performance will be directly compared to ultrasound using multiphasic MRI as the standard of care for the diagnosis of HCC.

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Supporting the 3rd leading cause of cancer-related death https://rogalevich.org/supporting-the-3rd-leading-cause-of-cancer-related-death/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 15:18:52 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/supporting-the-3rd-leading-cause-of-cancer-related-death/ Liver cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, and the incidence of primary liver cancer in the United States has tripled over the past four decades. While chronic viral hepatitis is the primary route to liver cancer in the United States, non-infectious causes such as morbid obesity, type 2 diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty […]]]>

Liver cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, and the incidence of primary liver cancer in the United States has tripled over the past four decades. While chronic viral hepatitis is the primary route to liver cancer in the United States, non-infectious causes such as morbid obesity, type 2 diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and non-infectious steatohepatitis associated alcoholism (NASH) increased rapidly. We will describe each of these pathways, starting with viral hepatitis (HCV and HBV) and alcoholic cirrhosis.


There is a morbid saying that cancer eventually affects us all, unless something else affects us first.

While some cancers currently have no accessible prevention, some can be effectively prevented. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of those that can be prevented, but once HCC is established and symptomatic, survival rates drop sharply. While liver cancer is the 8and location of cancer site by prevalence (Figure 1), this is the 3rd leading cause of death (Figure 2). HCC has a high mortality profile with a median survival after diagnosis of 6-20 months, and in the United States it has a 5-year survival rate of only 10% (Golabi, et al., 2017)

Figure 1. Top 10 cancer sites by case (Sung et al, 2021)

Top 10 cancer sites by death

Figure 2. Top 10 cancer sites by death (Sung et al, 2021)

The COVID-19 pandemic has rightly occupied the minds and efforts of nearly everyone in healthcare for the past two years, but HCC has not gone away and continues to cause daily damage. . HCC was on 4and leading cause of cancer-related death in 2019 (Yang et al., 2019), and has been steadily increasing – it has tripled in the United States (Rawla, Sunkara, Muralidharan & Raj, 2018).

Although your daily chance of encountering a patient with HCC is still small, it increases year by year and there is a serious risk of missing the window of opportunity to prevent full-blown HCC.

This blog will describe how to be alert to the causes and cases of HCC, and we will provide you with tools and resources to help you identify HCC, ways to connect your patient with appropriate specialists, and help you find appropriate studies and trials for your patient.

There are four main HCC risk factors:

  1. Hepatitis B (HBV)
  2. Hepatitis C (HCV)
  3. Excessive consumption of alcohol
  4. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) resulting in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH)

How likely are you to encounter hepatocellular carcinoma in patients?

In the near future, it is unlikely that any specific patient you see will already have HCC. That’s great, but it’s also a problem because you’re less likely to recognize it immediately. For HCC, delay is the killer.

However, you are very likely to see a patient who, regardless of their primary complaint, is already on one or more of the four main HCC pathways. The picture is also skewed when race is taken into account – while the overall rate of HBV infection has declined significantly since 1991, it remains a concern for the African American population. In 2017, non-Hispanic African Americans were 1.5 times more likely to die from viral hepatitis than whites, and almost twice as likely to die from HCV. (HHS-OMH”Hepatitis and African Americans”)

Anything you can do to increase HBV vaccination rates and prevent HCV infection will help steer your patients away from the viral pathway. It is therefore important to use screening tests for HBV and HCV and to strongly encourage HBV vaccination even if patients are not in high-risk categories. Likewise, addressing alcohol use and encouraging your patients to follow guidelines will help steer them away from alcohol’s path to HCC.

the NAFLD/NASH pathway talks about lifestyle changes that are inherently healthier and worth discussing. Discussing healthy eating, limiting portion sizes, and maintaining a healthy weight with your patients can help steer them away from this path.

Patient history that should raise your index of suspicion includes past unprotected sex, use of needles, binge drinking or binge drinking, or increasing obesity. However, it is important to keep in mind that many patients who had no obvious risk factors in their history nevertheless went on to have HCC. Although atypical, HCC can be the result of maternal HBV infection or HCV transmitted to children. For an example, see “Better off bald: a life in 147 days

How to discuss staging with patients

Discussing staging with patients can be difficult, and the literature is often either aimed at clinicians or contains misleading information. Blue Faery provides clinically accurate yet understandable materials to help you describe the staging and help the patient understand where they are on the spectrum.

These materials include:

  • The HCC patient education brochures is written in plain language and intended to be read by the patient.
  • The Blue Faery and Exelixis staging discussion pad contains anatomical graphics and easy-to-understand text. Each double-sided sheet allows the doctor to add notes that his patient can use after the appointment.
  • the Liver Cancer Patient Resource Guide is a 20-page booklet containing relevant explanations and resources for HCC patients and their caregivers.

Blue Faery will send these documents free of charge to any doctor who requests them.

How to Find Hepatocellular Carcinoma Specialists, Treatment Options and Clinical Trials

Treatment of HCC is best approached with a multidisciplinary team coordinated by a primary care physician. The most effective approach will likely require the expertise of multiple healthcare professionals, including the primary care physician, and may include an oncologist with experience in HCC, gastroenterologist, hepatologist, radiologist interventionist, a radiation oncologist, a surgical oncologist and a transplant surgeon.

Where to find clinical trials specific to hepatocellular carcinoma

To find all clinical trials, the best option is clinicaltrials.gov, but this website can be confusing and difficult to navigate. To help physicians guide their patients to relevant trials, Blue Faery has a custom HCC clinical trial browser.

Where can patients find community support?

Patient communities are very helpful in providing patients with practical guidance for their care journey and are often a source of emotional support from people who understand the experience.

the Blue Fairy Liver Cancer Community is a free, HIPAA-compliant online community where patients and caregivers are invited to join and seek or exchange relevant information about HCC care. Members ask questions, discuss concerns and find common ground along their cancer journey. Forum moderators include Community Ambassadors who were former caregivers of HCC patients.

For individual patient support, Blue Faery has partnered with Imerman Angels, a non-profit organization that provides peer-to-peer support services to the liver cancer community. Blue Faery and Imerman Angels believe that no one should face cancer alone.

Conclusion

With proper screening, testing and inoculation, the viral pathway to HCC can often be interrupted. Blue Faery provides free, patient-readable and clinically accurate materials to help physicians discuss their patients’ staging, options and resources.

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New trial aims to test non-invasive treatment for early-stage liver cancer https://rogalevich.org/new-trial-aims-to-test-non-invasive-treatment-for-early-stage-liver-cancer/ Sat, 26 Feb 2022 04:28:00 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/new-trial-aims-to-test-non-invasive-treatment-for-early-stage-liver-cancer/ Researchers are set to test a non-invasive treatment for inoperable early-stage liver cancer, thanks to an injection of more than $2 million in federal government funding. Led by Professor Alan Wigg of Flinders University College of Medicine and Public Health, the trial aims to test stereotactic ablative body radiation therapy (SABR), a non-invasive technique that […]]]>

Researchers are set to test a non-invasive treatment for inoperable early-stage liver cancer, thanks to an injection of more than $2 million in federal government funding.

Led by Professor Alan Wigg of Flinders University College of Medicine and Public Health, the trial aims to test stereotactic ablative body radiation therapy (SABR), a non-invasive technique that delivers high doses of radiation very precisely. .

Currently, the standard of care for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common type of liver cancer, is percutaneous ablation therapy, a thermal ablation treatment (using extreme temperatures to remove the cancer) that is given directly into the tumor using a needle. .

“Studies have shown that the current standard of care is not always effective, with cancer likely to come back in over 30% of cases, and a number of people not having access to treatment in the first place, due to the size and position of the tumour,” explains Professor Wigg.

“Stereotactic ablative body radiation therapy, on the other hand, is a relatively new radiation therapy technique that has already been used successfully to treat a number of other cancers, but it is not yet widely used to treat liver cancers. .

“It is delivered non-invasively by targeting the tumor with a number of beams of radiation from different angles, allowing delivery of a high dose and precise treatment over three to five sessions and reducing tissue damage. healthy surroundings.”

The project, a collaboration between leading haematologists, radiation oncologists and radiologists at 16 leading Australian liver centres, will carry out a randomized controlled trial to compare non-invasive treatment to the current invasive standard of care, with the possibility that the results modify the treatment. global protocols.

Currently, SBRT is considered experimental and is only used after first-line treatments have failed. However, preliminary research has shown that the treatment has the potential to control tumors with very few adverse effects and can reach those that would not be treatable by percutaneous ablation, due to the size or difficult location of a tumor. tumor.


Professor Alan Wigg, Faculty of Medicine and Public Health, Flinders University

Researchers say that with the rise in liver cancer rates in Australia, it is essential that the best treatment is proven and applied.

“Rates of hepatocellular carcinoma have risen 378% over the past 30 years, the second highest increase of any cancer type, while its death rate has seen the highest increase of any cancer,” says the Professor Wigg.

“HCC is the only low-survival cancer whose incidence is increasing rapidly. It is therefore essential that we find ways to improve patient outcomes.

“SABR may improve tumor control while being able to be administered on an outpatient basis over fewer treatment sessions, which means it is also likely to be cost effective and capable of rapid adoption into clinical practice. “

The 5-year trial will begin this year with trial sites planned in all major states in Australia.

The project, A randomized controlled trial of Sstandard OF VSare against RbyeAblahJions in Eearly SHCC study (SOCRATES HCC study), was funded by the Rare Cancers, Rare Diseases and Unmet Needs Program of the Medical Research Future Fund.

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a non-invasive treatment trial will soon begin https://rogalevich.org/a-non-invasive-treatment-trial-will-soon-begin/ Fri, 25 Feb 2022 06:17:00 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/a-non-invasive-treatment-trial-will-soon-begin/ A new non-invasive treatment for inoperable early-stage liver cancer is set to be trialled across Australia this year. The trial conducted by Professor Alan Wigg of flinders university The College of Medicine and Public Health aims to test stereotactic ablative body radiation therapy (SABR), a noninvasive technique that allows precise delivery of high doses of […]]]>
Liver cancer: a non-invasive treatment trial will soon begin

A new non-invasive treatment for inoperable early-stage liver cancer is set to be trialled across Australia this year.

The trial conducted by Professor Alan Wigg of flinders university The College of Medicine and Public Health aims to test stereotactic ablative body radiation therapy (SABR), a noninvasive technique that allows precise delivery of high doses of radiation.

Currently, the standard of care for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common type of liver cancer, is treatment with percutaneous ablation, a thermal ablation treatment delivered directly into the tumor using a needle. .

“Studies have shown that the current standard of care is not always effective, with cancer likely to come back in over 30% of cases, and a number of people not having access to treatment in the first place, due to the size and position of the tumour,” Professor Wigg said.

Stereotactic ablative body radiation therapy is a relatively new radiation therapy technique that has already been used successfully to treat a number of other cancers, but it is not yet widely used to treat liver cancers, he said. declared.

“It is delivered non-invasively by targeting the tumor with a number of beams of radiation from different angles, allowing delivery of a high dose and precise treatment over three to five sessions and reducing tissue damage. healthy surroundings.”

The project, a collaboration between leading hepatologists, radiation oncologists and radiologists at 16 leading Australian liver centres, will carry out a randomized controlled trial to compare non-invasive treatment to the current invasive standard of care, with the possibility that the results modify the treatment. global protocols.

“Currently, SBRT is considered experimental and only used after first-line treatments have failed,” Professor Wigg said.

“However, preliminary research has shown that the treatment has the potential to control tumors with very few adverse events and can reach those that would not be treatable with percutaneous ablation, due to the size or difficult location of the tumor. a tumor.”

Researchers say that with the rise in liver cancer rates in Australia, it is essential that the best treatment is proven and applied.

“Hepatocellular carcinoma rates have increased 378% over the past 30 years, the second highest increase of any cancer type, while its death rate has seen the largest increase of any cancer,” said Professor Wigg.

“HCC is the only low-survival cancer whose incidence is increasing rapidly. It is therefore essential that we find ways to improve patient outcomes.

“SABR may improve tumor control while being able to be administered on an outpatient basis over fewer treatment sessions, which means it is also likely to be cost effective and capable of rapid adoption into clinical practice. “

The 5-year trial, funded by the Medical Research Future Fund’s Rare Cancers, Rare Diseases and Unmet Need Grant Opportunity program, will begin this year with planned trial sites in all major states of Australia.

Image credit: ©stock.adobe.com/au/magicmine

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Oregon man diagnosed with ‘terminal’ liver cancer continues to thrive https://rogalevich.org/oregon-man-diagnosed-with-terminal-liver-cancer-continues-to-thrive/ Thu, 24 Feb 2022 18:48:22 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/oregon-man-diagnosed-with-terminal-liver-cancer-continues-to-thrive/ Understanding liver cancer and the importance of second opinions Larry Sullivan was diagnosed with ‘terminal’ liver cancer in 2019. But now, thanks to an individualized treatment approach curated by multiple doctors, he feels better than he has in a long time, with his cancer nearly having faded away. Liver cancer begins in the liver, an […]]]>

Understanding liver cancer and the importance of second opinions

  • Larry Sullivan was diagnosed with ‘terminal’ liver cancer in 2019. But now, thanks to an individualized treatment approach curated by multiple doctors, he feels better than he has in a long time, with his cancer nearly having faded away.
  • Liver cancer begins in the liver, an organ located below the diaphragm and above the stomach. The most common form of the disease is hepatocellular carcinoma, but there are also other types of liver cancers.
  • One of the greatest cancer researchers of our time told SurvivorNet that people should get “multiple” opinions after a cancer diagnosis.

When Larry Sullivan was diagnosed with “terminal” liver cancer in 2019, his mind started racing. But thanks to an individualized treatment approach from multiple doctors, Sullivan’s cancer is almost gone today.

“It’s so amazing and unexpected for me,” he said where he is today. “It’s been a tough trip but I’m doing great.”

With the help of Oregon Cancer Alliance which strives to bring together leading cancer specialists to provide coordinated expert care, Sullivan received a treatment plan organized by several specialists from different clinics. To begin with, Sullivan underwent radioembolization. This procedure involves injecting small beads (called microspheres) with a radioactive isotope (yttrium-90 or Y-90) attached into the hepatic artery that supplies blood to the liver and gallbladder. Then the beads emit small amounts of radiation to the tumor site for several days.

“It allows us to go to where the tumors are and deliver treatment,” says the interventional radiologist, Dr. Donald Garbett, who performed the procedure. “By delivering the treatment directly into the tumour, the rest of the body doesn’t feel it as it would with other treatment procedures. We were able to treat all of Mr. Sullivan’s tumor and it immediately started to shrink.

From there, Sullivan was prescribed a combination of immunotherapy drugs, Yervoy and Opdivo, to treat the cancer that had spread to his lungs and bones. Immunotherapy, in general, has been shown to be extremely effective in treating several cancers, although it does not work for everyone.

Fighting cancer with the body’s own cells: the immunotherapy revolution

After this treatment, doctors could no longer see the cancer in Sullivan’s lungs and bones. In addition to these treatments, Sullivan also underwent spinal surgery and radiation therapy.

Now Sullivan is feeling well and is returning to work as a part-time school psychologist. He also spends time with his family, travels and even restores boats.

“I’m very lucky. I didn’t even imagine six months ago that this would happen. says Sullivan. “It’s been difficult at times, but now I can do things again and have a little joy in my life. am really excited to have more time with my family.

Understanding Liver Cancer

Liver cancer begins in the liver, an organ located below the diaphragm and above the stomach. American Cancer Society estimates that approximately 41,260 new cases (28,600 in men and 12,660 in women) of primary liver cancer and cancer of the intrahepatic bile ducts will be diagnosed in 2022. The most common form of the disease is hepatocellular carcinoma, but there are also other types of liver cancer.

Several risk factors may increase the risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), including but not limited to the following:

  • Gender (hepatocellular carcinoma is much more common in men than in women)
  • Race/ethnicity (In the United States, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders have the highest rates of liver cancer, followed by Hispanics/Latinos, American Indians/Alaska Natives , African Americans and Whites)
  • Chronic viral hepatitis
  • Cirrhosis (a disease in which liver cells are damaged and replaced by scar tissue)
  • Excessive consumption of alcohol
  • Smoking
  • Obesity
  • Type 2 diabetes

Cancer survivor Joel Naftelberg learned to dance to his problems

Blood tests, ultrasounds, CT scans (x-ray images), MRIs (medical imaging), and angiograms are usually used to confirm a diagnosis of liver cancer. A liver biopsy, where a small piece of tissue is removed and analyzed for cancer cells, may also be performed.

Often a liver transplant is considered the best plan when the patient is eligible. For cases of recurrent liver cancer and cancer that has spread throughout the body, your doctor may consider targeted therapy, immunotherapy, or chemotherapy as the next step.

The importance of getting a second opinion

After you’ve been diagnosed with cancer, it’s important to remember that you can, and should, talk to other cancer specialists about your disease.

“If I had any advice for you following a cancer diagnosis, it would be to first seek several opinions on the best care”, National Cancer Institute Chief of Surgery Steven Rosenberg said SurvivorNet in a previous interview. “Because finding a doctor who is up to date with the latest information is important.”

RELATED: Second (and third) opinions are important when deciding between surgery or radiation therapy

As we highlight in several areas of SurvivorNet, highly respected doctors sometimes disagree about the right treatment, and advances in genetics and immunotherapy create new options. Moreover, in some cases, the specific treatment is not clearly defined. This is one more reason why it is crucial to understand the potential approaches to your disease.

At the National Cancer Institute, there is a patient referral service that “will guide patients to the right group based on their disease state so that they can access these experimental new treatments,” says Rosenberg.

Cancer research legend urges patients to get multiple opinions

Additionally, getting another opinion can also help you avoid doctor bias. For example, some surgeons have radiotherapy centers. “So there may be a conflict of interest if you go to a surgeon who recommends radiation therapy, because that type of facility is partly owned by that type of facility,” Dr. Jim Hudirector of robotic surgery at Weill Cornell Medical Center, tells SurvivorNet.

Other reasons to get a second opinion include:

  • To see a doctor who is more experienced in treating your type of cancer
  • You have a rare type of cancer
  • There are many ways to treat your cancer
  • You feel like your doctor isn’t listening to you or giving you good advice
  • You have trouble understanding your doctor
  • You do not like the treatment recommended by your doctor or are worried about its possible side effects
  • Your insurance company wants you to get another medical opinion
  • Your cancer is not getting better with your current treatment

Be Insistent, Be Your Own Advocate, Says Leading Expert

Ultimately, being proactive about your health could be a matter of life and death. Learn as much as you can from as many experts as you can, so you know you’ve done your best to take control of your health.

Contributor: Marisa Sullivan

Learn more about SurvivorNet’s rigorous medical review process.

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Advanced Liver Cancer Market Overview, Epidemiological Segmentation and Market Report 2032 https://rogalevich.org/advanced-liver-cancer-market-overview-epidemiological-segmentation-and-market-report-2032/ Wed, 16 Feb 2022 01:13:59 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/advanced-liver-cancer-market-overview-epidemiological-segmentation-and-market-report-2032/ DelveInsight added a report on “Advanced Liver Cancer Market“. It covers an overview, its causes, signs and symptoms, and therapies. Major players are involved in the development of therapies for advanced liver cancer. The launch of emerging therapies will have a significant impact on the advanced liver cancer market. Overview of Advanced Liver Cancer Advanced […]]]>

DelveInsight added a report on “Advanced Liver Cancer Market“. It covers an overview, its causes, signs and symptoms, and therapies. Major players are involved in the development of therapies for advanced liver cancer. The launch of emerging therapies will have a significant impact on the advanced liver cancer market.

Overview of Advanced Liver Cancer

Advanced liver cancer is stage IV liver cancer in which the cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes and may have grown into nearby blood vessels or organs. It doesn’t often metastasize, but when it does, it’s more likely to spread to the lungs and bones. It is further categorized into stages IVA and IVB. In stage IVA, the cancer has grown in the blood vessels or organs around the liver and has spread to the lymph nodes but not to other parts of the body. In stage IVB, the cancer has spread to another part of the body, such as the lungs or the bones.

Get sample report @ https://www.delveinsight.com/sample-request/advanced-liver-cancer-market

Some of the major highlights of the Advanced Liver Cancer Market report

  • The proportion of early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is about 65%, while only 5% of patients are present at an advanced stage in Japan.
  • Incidence rates are significantly higher in males than in females in a number of (mainly older) age groups.
  • Liver cancer is the fifth most common cancer in men and the ninth most common cancer in women.
  • Advanced Liver Cancer Societies such as Ono Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd, Benhealth Biopharmaceutical Co., Ltd., Millennium Pharmaceuticals, Can-Fite BioPharma and many others.
  • Advanced Liver Cancer Therapies such as Nivolumab, CIK and CD3-MUC1, MLN0128, CF102 and several others.

Advanced symptoms of liver cancer

  • lose weight without trying
  • Loss of appetite
  • Upper abdominal pain
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • General weakness and fatigue
  • abdominal swelling
  • Yellowing of your skin and the whites of your eyes (jaundice)
  • White and chalky stools

Advanced Liver Cancer Treatment

Treatments such as radiation therapy may also be used to help relieve pain and other symptoms. Ablation therapy and embolization are other available options that help improve symptoms without surgery. Available targeted therapies have a variety of side effects, such as sorafenib (Nexavar), including fatigue, skin rashes, high blood pressure, hand and foot sores, and loss of appetite. There is therefore a need for several new drugs on the market for appropriate treatment of advanced liver cancer.

Get a preview of the report @ https://www.delveinsight.com/sample-request/advanced-liver-cancer-market

Advanced Liver Cancer Market Insights

When liver cancer is at an advanced stage, treatment will not be able to cure it. It aims to control the cancer, relieve the symptoms and give a good quality of life to the patient. Advanced liver cancer is difficult to treat because it has already spread to other organs as well, so most treatments aim to make patients feel better and possibly live longer. Advanced liver cancer spreads to the lymph nodes or other organs, and because it is widespread, it cannot be treated with surgery. The only option left is to take medication.

Advanced Segmentation of Liver Cancer Epidemiology

  • Total number of incidents
  • Age specific incident cases
  • Gender-specific incidents Cases
  • Diagnosed and treatable cases

Advanced evaluation of emerging liver cancer therapies

Key players such as Benhealth Biopharmaceutical (Shenzhen), Bristol-Myers Squibb, Can-Fite BioPharma and many others are developing therapies for the treatment of patients with advanced liver cancer. CIK and CD3-MUC1 (Benhealth Biopharmaceutical), MLN0128 (Millennium Pharmaceuticals), CF102 (Can-Fite BioPharma) along with other compelling treatment options in clinical trials are expected to increase the overall advanced liver cancer market size.

Request sample report @ https://www.delveinsight.com/sample-request/advanced-liver-cancer-market

Contents

1. Key information

2. Executive Summary of Advanced Liver Cancer

3. Competitive Intelligence Analysis for Advanced Liver Cancer

4. Advanced Liver Cancer: Market Snapshot

5. Advanced liver cancer: background and overview of the disease

6. Patient journey

7. Advanced liver cancer epidemiology and patient population

8. Treatment Algorithm, Current Treatment and Medical Practices

9. Unmet needs in advanced liver cancer

10. Key Parameters of Advanced Liver Cancer Treatment

11. Products marketed for advanced liver cancer

12. Advanced emerging therapies for liver cancer

13. Advanced Liver Cancer: Seven Key Market Insights

14. Attribute analysis

15. 7MM: Market Outlook

16. Overview of Access and Reimbursement for Advanced Liver Cancer

17. KOL Views

18. Market Drivers

19. Market Barriers

20. Appendix

21. DelveInsight Abilities

22. Disclaimer

23. About DelveInsight

About Us

DelveInsight is a business consulting and market research firm, providing expert business solutions for the life sciences verticals and offering premier consulting services in the areas of R&D, strategy formulation, operations , competitive intelligence, competitive landscape design and mergers and acquisitions.

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Maranda Curtis partners with the Adrienne Wilson Liver Cancer Association to fight liver cancer https://rogalevich.org/maranda-curtis-partners-with-the-adrienne-wilson-liver-cancer-association-to-fight-liver-cancer/ Tue, 15 Feb 2022 21:45:43 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/maranda-curtis-partners-with-the-adrienne-wilson-liver-cancer-association-to-fight-liver-cancer/ Maranda Curtis, award-winning gospel and worship singer-songwriter, lends her voice to promote liver cancer prevention in the African American community. The acclaimed music artist has teamed up with Blue Faery: The Adrienne Wilson Liver Cancer Association to create a new Public Service Announcement (PSA) campaign and live stream with doctors and experts on Saturday February […]]]>

Maranda Curtis, award-winning gospel and worship singer-songwriter, lends her voice to promote liver cancer prevention in the African American community. The acclaimed music artist has teamed up with Blue Faery: The Adrienne Wilson Liver Cancer Association to create a new Public Service Announcement (PSA) campaign and live stream with doctors and experts on Saturday February 19 at 1:00 p.m. ET in partnership with the National Black Church Initiative (NBCI) for faith communities titled “Love Your Liver”. The campaign and livestream aims to educate about the importance of liver cancer screenings, which can help at-risk populations catch and treat cancer in its early stages.

Within the African-American community, liver cancer is far more deadly than for the American population. In fact, in 2019, chronic liver disease was the eighth leading cause of death for non-Hispanic blacks aged 45 to 64. Often, liver cancer develops due to hepatitis C, which is twice as common in the black community compared to the general population. Hepatitis C is the main risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common type of liver cancer in American adults. However, in recent years researchers have discovered that early interventions can make all the difference in saving lives.

“I’m proud to lend my voice to the ‘Love Your Liver’ campaign to encourage African Americans to stay diligent about liver cancer screening,” said curtis. “I am grateful to Blue Faery: The Adrienne Wilson Liver Cancer Association for the opportunity to promote a cause vital to the well-being of the African-American community.”

Since its launch 20 years ago, Blue Faery’s mission has been to prevent, treat and cure primary liver cancer, in particular HCC, through research, education and advocacy. Andrea Wilson Woods, founder and president of the non-profit organization, created the organization in memory of her sister, Adrienne, who died of stage IV liver cancer at the age of 15. One of the main goals of the organization is to help educate people about the risk factors for liver cancer and to encourage early detection.

“Over the past few years, scientific research has shown the importance of early detection for people suffering from liver disease or cancer. With liver cancer more aggressively targeting the African American community, it is even more critical that this community receive regular screenings,” said Woods. “We are so grateful to Maranda for their partnership on the ‘Love Your Liver’ campaign and are confident that their assistance in this effort will save lives.”

Maranda released her debut single in 2012 and has continued to grow her fanbase over the past decade with her denominational hits. His powerful new album DIE TO LIVE will be released on February 18, 2022.

For more information on the Love Your Liver campaign, visit https://loveyourliver.us . To learn more about the life and music of Maranda Curtis, visit https://www.iammaranda.com/.

The Love Your Liver campaign is supported by Eisai, Exelixis, Merck, AstraZeneca, Bristol Myers Squibband Genentech.

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MEDIVIR AB – YEAR END REPORT JANUARY https://rogalevich.org/medivir-ab-year-end-report-january/ Tue, 15 Feb 2022 07:44:00 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/medivir-ab-year-end-report-january/ HUDDINGE, Sweden, February 15, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — October – December Quarterly Financial Summary Net sales amounted to SEK13.9 (1.5 million. The loss before interest, taxes and amortization (EBITDA) amounts to -SEK23.5 (-10.6) million. Basic and diluted earnings per share amounted to SEK-0.44 (-0.46) and SEK-0.44 (-0.46) respectively. Cash flow from operating activities amounted to -SEK5.4 […]]]>

HUDDINGE, Sweden, February 15, 2022 /PRNewswire/ —

October – December

Quarterly Financial Summary

  • Net sales amounted to SEK13.9 (1.5 million.
  • The loss before interest, taxes and amortization (EBITDA) amounts to -SEK23.5 (-10.6) million. Basic and diluted earnings per share amounted to SEK-0.44 (-0.46) and SEK-0.44 (-0.46) respectively.
  • Cash flow from operating activities amounted to -SEK5.4 (-1.0) million.
  • Cash and short-term investments at the end of the period amounted to SEK221.2 (70.0) million.

Highlights of the quarter

  • In October, the Board of Directors appointed jens lindberg as the new CEO of Medivir. jens lindberg has extensive experience in the pharmaceutical industry and the field of oncology. He comes from Sedana Medical where he served as vice president of business operations and interim CEO.
  • IGM Biosciences, Inc. has initiated its clinical study in solid cancers with birinapant (IGM-9427) in combination with the IGM DR5 agonist antibody IGM-8444. The purpose of this first clinical trial with the combination is to assess safety and tolerability.
  • In November, the results of an investigator-initiated phase II clinical trial of reminostat in patients with squamous cell carcinoma were published.
  • In December, it was announced that the first patient with hepatocellular carcinoma had started treatment with fostroxacitabine bralpamide (MIV-818) in the phase 1b / 2a combined study.

January – December

Financial summary for the period

  • Net sales amounted to SEK25.5 (13.9) million.
  • The loss before interest, taxes and amortization (EBITDA) amounts to -SEK59.5 (-38.5) million. Basic and diluted earnings per share amounted to -SEK1.20 (-1.75) and -SEK1.20 (-1.75) respectively.
  • Cash flow from operating activities amounted to -SEK 48.7 (-58.1) million.
  • Cash and short-term investments at the end of the period amounted to SEK221.2 (70.0) million.

Significant events after the end of the period

  • In January, it was announced that the WHO had selected fostroxacitabine bralpamide as the official generic name for patented drug candidate MIV-818, which is in clinical development for primary liver cancer.
  • jens lindberg took over as CEO of Medivir on January 24, 2022.

Conference call for investors, analysts and media

Year-end report January – December 2021 will be presented by the CEO of Medivir, jens lindberg.

Time: Tuesday, February 15, 2022at 2:00 p.m. (CET).

Telephone numbers of participants from:

Sweden + 46 8 566 427 06

Europe +44 33 3300 9032

USA +1 646 722 4956

The conference call will also be broadcast via a link on the website: www.medivir.com

The presentation will be available on the Medivir website after the end of the conference.

Message from the CEO

At January 24, 2022, I took over the management of Medivir and after my first professional experience, I understand why the company has been so successful in achieving its business objectives in 2021. We have an extremely competent and experienced team who work with dedication with our two projects. fostroxacitabine bralpamide (MIV-818) and with the commercial development of our other assets. I hope I can contribute to strengthening our delivery capacity in the future. Under the leadership of the company’s former CEO, Yilmaz Mahshid, now a member of the Medivir Board of Directors, and our Chief Financial Officer Magnus Christensenwho has served as the company’s interim leader since May, Medivir has made significant progress in 2021.

Medivir’s drug development is focused on a very promising and proprietary clinical project, fostroxacitabine bralpamide (formerly MIV-818), with a clear therapeutic target, where unmet medical needs remain extremely high, despite recent clinical advances. Fostroxacitabine bralpamide has the potential to become the first oral, liver-targeting drug that can help patients with various liver cancers. Its unique mechanism of action means that it does not directly compete with other treatment options, but rather allows combination treatments with other drug alternatives in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Liver cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide and HCC is the most common form of cancer that arises in the liver. The effect of today’s drugs is often limited and mortality remains high.

After the end of the year, MIV-818 received the official generic name fostroxacitabine bralpamide from the World Health Organization WHO, which we consider an important step towards a product for the treatment of HCC.

The clinical development program for fostroxacitabine bralpamide passed several milestones during the year. In April, it was announced that initial results from the monotherapy portion of the Phase Ib study were positive with a good safety and tolerability profile. They were then presented in more detail at the ESMO Congress in September and aroused great interest. In May, the design of the next stage, the phase 1b/2A combination study with fostroxacitabine bralpamide for liver cancer has been presented. Regulatory approval from the UK’s Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) for the study was obtained in late August, and from South Korea’s Ministry of Food and Drug Safety (MFDS) in November.

In December, the first patient with HCC received a dose in the phase 1b/2a combination study with fostroxacitabine bralpamide, which is given in combination with two other drugs, either Lenvima®, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, or Keytruda®, an anti-PD-1 checkpoint inhibitor. Lenvima® and Keytruda® (approved in the United States) are currently approved as monotherapy treatments for HCC.

The licensing agreement with IGM Biosciences, Inc., which gives IGM worldwide and exclusive rights to develop birinapant, could potentially provide milestone payments up to a total of approximately $350 million as well as tiered royalties through “mid-teens”. At the time of signing January 2021Medivir received $1 millionand when IGM launched a phase I clinical trial in solid cancers with birinapant in combination with its own DR5 agonist antibody IGM-8444 in early November, it was followed by an additional clinical trial $1.5 million. Of course, we look forward to continued clinical development of birinapant by IGM.

Also for the reminostat, it is worth noting a number of advances made during the year. Positive results from the investigator-initiated Phase II clinical trial of reminostat in patients with squamous cell carcinoma were published in November in the scientific journal JAMA Dermatology. Promising results from the investigator-initiated phase II study with reminostat for basal cell carcinoma were published in August in the scientific journal Clinical Cancer Research. Thanks to a renegotiated multi-party agreement, Medivir was able to further strengthen the commercial development potential of reminostat in August.

Business development and collaborations are at the heart of Medivir’s success. Birinapant is a good example of this and we see opportunities for reminostat and MIV-711, but also in other smaller projects. In early 2021, a license agreement was concluded with Ubiquigent for the USP7 preclinical research program.

Thanks to the financing which was successfully completed at the beginning of the year and which enabled the company to 223 million Swedish crowns before transaction costs, we enter 2022 with resources and commercial development opportunities that offer good conditions to pursue the clinical development program of our cutting-edge fostroxacitabine bralpamide project. Our goal is to make it an effective medicine against liver cancer that makes a real difference for patients and for healthcare, and therefore also for our shareholders. I look forward to keeping you informed of the continued development of Medivir.

jens lindberg

Chief executive officer

For more information, please contact

Magnus ChristensenCFO, +46 (0)8 5468 3100
E-mail: [email protected]

This report has not been reviewed by the auditors.

The information was submitted for publication at 08:30 CET on February 15, 2022.

This information was brought to you by Cision http://news.cision.com

https://news.cision.com/medivir/r/medivir-ab—year-end-report-january—december-2021,c3506550

The following files are available for download:

SOURCE Medivir

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Liver cancer in Hispanic and Latino communities https://rogalevich.org/liver-cancer-in-hispanic-and-latino-communities/ Thu, 10 Feb 2022 23:15:32 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/liver-cancer-in-hispanic-and-latino-communities/ Liver cancer is cancer that starts in any part of the liver. The most common type of liver cancer is called hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Liver cancer rates are rising in the United States. In men, HCC is the fifth most common cause of cancer-related deaths. For women, he ranks seventh. According to American Cancer Society, […]]]>

Liver cancer is cancer that starts in any part of the liver. The most common type of liver cancer is called hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Liver cancer rates are rising in the United States. In men, HCC is the fifth most common cause of cancer-related deaths. For women, he ranks seventh.

According to American Cancer Society, Hispanics and Latinos have higher rates of liver cancer than non-white Hispanics. They also have higher death rates from liver cancer.

Many cases of liver cancer can be prevented. Better access to preventive care could reduce the risk. Language barriers and lack of health insurance are challenges to receiving care for many Latinos.

The liver is a large organ that has many jobs in the body. It plays a role in digestion. It also filters the blood to remove harmful substances.

Liver cancer is cancer that starts in any part of the liver. The most common form of liver cancer is HCC. This type of cancer starts in the cells that make up the body of the liver. Cancer can also start in the ducts of the liver, but this is less common. HCC rate keep going up in the USA.

In 2020, 4.7% of new cancer diagnoses worldwide were liver cancer. He represented 8.3% cancer deaths. In the United States, it is estimated that there will be approximately 41,260 people diagnosed with liver cancer in 2022. This is expected to increase.

Cirrhosis is a major risk factor for developing liver cancer. On 80 percent of people with liver cancer have cirrhosis.

Anything that damages the liver can increase the risk of cirrhosis and liver cancer. Whenever the liver is damaged, it tries to repair itself. Over time, the cycle of damage and repair causes scar tissue.

Cirrhosis is severe scarring of the liver. When there is too much damage and scar tissue builds up, the liver no longer functions properly.

Risk factors for cirrhosis and liver cancer include:

  • hepatitis B or C infection
  • heavy drinking
  • exposure to aflatoxin from contaminated food, water, or soil
  • smoking tobacco
  • non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH)

Hispanics have much higher rates of liver cancer than non-Hispanic whites in the United States. Data from 2014 to 2019 shows that they have double non-Hispanic rates. Data from 2018 shows that 1 out of 5 people with liver cancer in the United States is Hispanic.

Although liver cancer rates are on the rise in all groups, they are much higher among Hispanics. This group saw a 4.7% increase per year since 2000.

Hispanics are also diagnosed with more advanced stages of liver cancer. This means there are often fewer treatment options available. Compared to non-Hispanic whites, Hispanics have lower rates liver transplants. One theory to explain the lower rate of transplants is lower rates health insurance.

There are differences in liver cancer survival among blacks, Hispanics, and whites. A 2019 study found that the median survival time was highest for whites at 16.3 months. Median survival time was lowest for blacks at 10.6 months. The survival time for Hispanics was 14.4 months.

A number of factors may contribute to higher rates of liver cancer in Hispanic and Latino populations.

Hepatitis C

Hepatitis C infection remains a major cause of liver cancer. In Florida, hepatitis C is the main cause cases of liver cancer among Hispanics. In the USA, 50 to 60 percent of people with liver cancer are living with hepatitis C.

Overall, hepatitis C infections are stable or declining. The exception is that from 2014 to 2018 there was an increase of 2 percent in Hispanic women.

Hepatitis C is a treatable disease. For many people, however, there are major barriers to accessing testing and treatment. Treatment is expensive, and many people don’t know they have it until it’s advanced.

Chronic hepatitis C can lead to cirrhosis and sometimes liver cancer. Without regular access to health care, hepatitis C may go undetected and untreated.

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

Another risk factor for liver cancer is non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD can progress to another condition called non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). NASH is an advanced stage of fatty liver disease. Fat builds up around the liver, causing inflammation and scarring.

NAFLD is on the rise, affecting approximately 75 to 100 million people in the United States.

Hispanics have the highest rates of NAFLD compared to other ethnic groups. Various studies showed that between 8.4% and 45% of Hispanics have NAFLD. They are also more likely to progress to NASH, which increases the risk of cirrhosis and liver cancer.

A condition called metabolic syndrome is also associated with NAFLD. Metabolic syndrome is a group of conditions. These can include high blood pressure, diabetes or prediabetes, and low levels of HDL or good cholesterol. In the United States, Hispanics have the highest rates metabolic syndrome.

Cirrhosis

Liver cirrhosis is associated with 80 percent cases of liver cancer. There are different causes of cirrhosis. These include:

  • heavy drinking
  • NASH
  • hepatitis C infection

Hispanics have higher cirrhosis rates than other groups. A large study has shown that Hispanics have a 37 percent increased risk of cirrhosis compared to Caucasians. Hispanics are more likely have alcohol-related cirrhosis or NASH.

Liver cancer is usually not diagnosed at an early stage. Symptoms often only appear at an advanced stage, when it is more difficult to treat. In later stages, there are larger and more tumors, or the cancer has spread to other parts of the body.

When liver cancer is detected early, there are more treatment options. That’s why regular checkups and routine screenings are important, especially for people at high risk of developing liver cancer.

Access to appropriate care is necessary to prevent and manage liver cancer risk factors. However, research shows that Hispanics are less likely to access preventive care.

A number of factors can prevent Hispanic and Latino people with liver cancer from receiving proper care and treatment. These may include:

  • Socioeconomic status
  • lack of health insurance
  • Language barrier
  • lack of access to culturally appropriate care

People living in poverty have a much harder time getting the health care they need. In the USA, 16 percent of Hispanics lived in poverty in 2019, compared to 7% of non-Hispanic whites.

Hispanics are also the most likely to be uninsured. Among those aged 18 to 64, 26 percent lack health insurance. On 9 percent non-Hispanic whites are uninsured.

The Affordable Care Act has helped improve access for many people. It reduced the number of uninsured Hispanics by 11.9%. Medicaid is run by each state, so there are differences in criteria and access.

Over the past decade, several states have expanded their Medicaid programs. Other states have not, including Florida and Texas, which have large Hispanic populations. This leaves even more people without access to health insurance.

The cost of drugs is another issue in the United States. A large survey of Hispanics showed that 12.5% were unable to afford prescription drugs.

Lack of access to culturally appropriate care is also a potential barrier to liver cancer care for Hispanic and Latino people. Cultural competence means that healthcare professionals can provide care that meets the social, cultural and linguistic needs of their patients.

Hispanics and Latinos come from many countries. They have different traditions, foods and languages. Care and recommendations for people of one race or background will not work for everyone. Too often, people receive recommendations that don’t match their traditions.

Many things need to be improved for Hispanics and Latinos to have better access to health care. Access to culturally appropriate care can improve screening and preventive care. This may help reduce risk factors associated with cirrhosis and liver cancer.

In areas with large Hispanic or Latino populations, better access to health insurance coverage could reduce barriers to receiving care to help prevent and treat cancer.

To overcome language barriers, the services of an interpreter would be helpful. Another huge gap in care is the lack of Hispanic and Latino healthcare professionals. Hispanics and Latinos make up approximately 5 percent of physicians in the United States.

It is much less than the 17.4% of people in the United States who identify as Hispanic or Latino. We need ways to help more Hispanic and Latino people get started in medical careers. Getting treatment from someone who speaks your language and understands your culture can make a big difference.

Hispanic and Latino people have higher rates of liver cancer and liver cancer death. There are several possible reasons for this. Hispanic and Latino people have higher rates of metabolic syndrome, NAFLD, and NASH. These increase the risk of cirrhosis and liver cancer.

Hepatitis C is a treatable disease that increases the risk of liver cancer. Hispanic and Latino people are not always able to access the right care or get treatment for hepatitis C.

Language barriers, poverty and lack of health insurance can prevent access to health care.

Increasing culturally competent care and removing cost and language barriers can help. Through strategies to improve access to care, many cases of liver cancer can be prevented or treated.

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