chronic liver – Rogalevich http://rogalevich.org/ Sat, 26 Mar 2022 12:37:04 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://rogalevich.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.png chronic liver – Rogalevich http://rogalevich.org/ 32 32 Liver cancer after hepatitis C: new risk strategy https://rogalevich.org/liver-cancer-after-hepatitis-c-new-risk-strategy/ Fri, 28 Jan 2022 16:12:06 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/liver-cancer-after-hepatitis-c-new-risk-strategy/ Hepatitis C can now be effectively treated with modern drugs. However, although they have been cured, some patients may develop liver cancer. Currently, biannual ultrasound screening is done to monitor for incipient cancer. A research team from MedUni Vienna has now developed a new tool that can determine patients’ cancer risk in a single exam. […]]]>

Hepatitis C can now be effectively treated with modern drugs. However, although they have been cured, some patients may develop liver cancer. Currently, biannual ultrasound screening is done to monitor for incipient cancer. A research team from MedUni Vienna has now developed a new tool that can determine patients’ cancer risk in a single exam. Their study on this subject was recently published in the prestigious Journal of Hepatology.

Hepatitis C is a common viral infection worldwide. For some years it has been treated with modern drugs, so that it can be cured in more than 95% of cases. Although they have survived the viral infection, some patients who have developed scar tissue in their liver are at risk for liver cancer (hepatocellular carcinoma). A biannual ultrasound is currently recommended as a screening measure for early detection, but it is inconvenient for patients and costly for the healthcare system.

The algorithm determines the risk
Now, a research group from the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology of the Department of Medicine III at MedUni Vienna has developed a risk stratification tool that only requires one single examination. Based on various non-invasive tests, the team led by Mattias Mandorfer and Georg Semmler was able to identify an algorithm to assess the individual risk of liver cancer based on blood values ​​and liver stiffness. This examination is carried out at the end of treatment for hepatitis C and also takes into account additional risk factors such as age and alcohol consumption.

This new tool makes it possible to differentiate patients at very low risk from those at high risk. While the previous recommendation for ultrasound screening would not seem effective in the case of low-risk cancer patients, consistent monitoring is needed in the high-risk patient group, say the researchers, highlighting the value of the results of the study. ‘study. The study has already confirmed the predictive value of the algorithm in a group of patients from several European countries and could greatly simplify follow-up procedures after hepatitis C treatment in the future. “Our study allowed us to capitalize on our previous scientific work and take a new step towards personalized follow-up of patients cured of hepatitis C”, adds Mattias Mandorfer.


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Frontline Lenvima Provided Survival Advantage to Liver Cancer Patients https://rogalevich.org/frontline-lenvima-provided-survival-advantage-to-liver-cancer-patients/ Sat, 22 Jan 2022 15:00:24 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/frontline-lenvima-provided-survival-advantage-to-liver-cancer-patients/ In a trial of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) – the most common type of liver cancer – a survival benefit was seen when Lenvima (lenvatinib) was given as initial therapy as opposed to chemoembolization transarterial (TACE), which is standard treatment. Researchers conducted an observational study of 31 eligible patients at multiple cancer centers, investigating […]]]>

In a trial of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) – the most common type of liver cancer – a survival benefit was seen when Lenvima (lenvatinib) was given as initial therapy as opposed to chemoembolization transarterial (TACE), which is standard treatment.

Researchers conducted an observational study of 31 eligible patients at multiple cancer centers, investigating whether treatment with Lenvima was effective for patients with stage B2 HCC who had not previously received TACE or systemic chemotherapy and had preserved organ function.

All patients in the trial had stage B2 HCC, as defined by the BCLC (Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer) staging system, which is a set of criteria for HCC management based on the status of performance, tumor extent and Child-Pugh score. (an assessment of the prognosis of liver disease).

The results were presented at the 2022 ASCO Symposium on Gastrointestinal Cancers.

The study’s primary overall survival objective was achieved, with 71% of patients alive after one year of treatment. The median overall survival – or how long a patient survives from the time of treatment – was 17 months.

Median progression-free survival, or the time from treatment to disease progression, was 10.4 months. The objective response rate (ORR), which shows the percentage of patients who responded to treatment, was measured by two different models – RECIST 1.1 and mRECIST – the difference being that the mRECIST criteria only measure the enhanced or viable part of the lesions. For RECIST 1.1, the overall response rate was 22.6% and 70.0% for mRECIST.

Since the standard treatment for these patients is TACE – a means of localizing chemotherapy and synthetic materials in a blood vessel to cut off the tumor’s blood supply and force chemotherapy into the tumor – the researchers pointed out that Lenvima may not be suitable for some patients.

If a patient’s disease does not meet criteria up to 7, which is designed by adding the number of tumors plus the diameter (in centimeters) of the largest tumors. If this number is more than seven, the person may have a decline in liver function and treatment with Lenvima may not be as beneficial.

Most patients were male (94%), the causes of chronic liver disease being hepatitis B virus (three patients), hepatitis C virus (six), alcohol abuse ( nine) or other (10).

The most common side effects, regardless of severity, were fatigue (68%), hypertension (65%) and anorexia (61%). Common serious or severe side effects were: increased aspartate aminotransferase (23%), which is a blood test that identifies liver damage; increased alanine aminotransferase (16%), which also indicates liver damage; and severe or worse proteinuria, which is an increase in protein levels in the urine (13%).

Treatment interruption was required in 61% of patients and dose reduction in 81%. Of 24 patients at the time of the researcher’s analysis, 17 (55%) discontinued due to disease progression, nine (29%) due to side effects, and two (6%) to switch to curative treatments. There was one patient death of unknown causes, although the patient’s disease had partially responded to treatment prior to his death.

For post-study treatment, 11 patients were treated with systemic chemotherapy, six received TACE and one received trans-arterial infusion.

Looking forward, the researchers wrote that randomized trials comparing Lenvima and TACE for these patients are warranted, and systemic chemotherapy before TACE will be a standard treatment strategy.

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Development of fatty liver disease as part of a healthy diet https://rogalevich.org/development-of-fatty-liver-disease-as-part-of-a-healthy-diet/ Tue, 18 Jan 2022 19:19:31 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/development-of-fatty-liver-disease-as-part-of-a-healthy-diet/ A new study identifies two genes, previously reported to be involved in cancer, as regulators of the metabolic state of the liver. Alterations in these genes influence the likelihood of developing fatty liver disease. The worldwide obesity epidemic has increased the risk of fat accumulation in the liver, a prelude to liver inflammation and liver […]]]>

A new study identifies two genes, previously reported to be involved in cancer, as regulators of the metabolic state of the liver. Alterations in these genes influence the likelihood of developing fatty liver disease.

The worldwide obesity epidemic has increased the risk of fat accumulation in the liver, a prelude to liver inflammation and liver disease. Yet a still intriguing paradox is the development of fatty liver disease in lean, normal-weight individuals and in individuals following a healthy diet. Scientists know that two genes, RNF43 and ZNRF3, are mutated in patients with liver cancer. However, their role in the development of liver cancer was until now unknown. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics (MPI-CBG) in Dresden, Germany, now describe that a loss or mutation of these genes causes lipid accumulation and inflammation in the liver in non-obese mice fed diet. These genetic alterations not only increase fat accumulation but also the number of proliferating liver cells (hepatocytes). In human patients, these alterations also increase the risk of developing NASH and fatty liver disease and reduce the patient’s survival time. These discoveries could facilitate the discovery of people at risk and could promote new therapeutic interventions and better management of the disease.

The liver is our central metabolic organ, which is vital for detoxification and digestion. Chronic liver diseases, such as cirrhosis, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, inflamed liver), as well as liver cancer, are on the rise worldwide, with a combined mortality of two million people who die each year. It is therefore more important than ever to understand their causes and the underlying molecular mechanisms of liver disease in order to prevent, manage and treat these growing patient subgroups. Previous cancer genomics studies have identified RNF43 and ZNRF3 as mutated genes in colon and liver cancer patients. However, their role in liver disease has not been explored. Meritxell Huch’s research laboratory at MPI-CBG, in collaboration with colleagues from the Gurdon Institute (Cambridge, UK) and the University of Cambridge, has now investigated the mechanisms by which alterations in these two genes can affect the emergence of liver diseases. . Their study is published in the journal Communication Nature.

To pursue this goal, the researchers worked with mice as an animal model, data from human individuals, human tissues and cultures of liver organoids, which are 3D cellular microstructures consisting of liver-like hepatocytes in a box. Germán Belenguer, first author of the study and postdoctoral researcher in Meritxell Huch’s group, explains: “With the organoid, we were able to grow hepatocytes mutated only in these genes, and we saw that the loss of these ci activates a signal that regulates lipid metabolism. As a result, fat metabolism is no longer under control and lipids accumulate in the liver, which in turn leads to fatty liver disease. Another consequence of the activated signal is that the hepatocytes multiply uncontrollably. The two mechanisms combined facilitate progression to fatty liver disease and cancer.” The scientists then compared the results of the experiments with patient data in a publicly available dataset from the International Cancer Genome Consortium. They assessed the survival prognosis when both genes are mutated in liver cancer patients and found that patients with these mutated genes had fatty liver disease and had a worse prognosis than liver cancer patients whose the two genes had not mutated.

“Our results can help identify individuals who carry an RNF43/ZNRF3 mutation and therefore are at risk of developing fatty liver disease or liver cancer,” says Meritxell Huch. She continues, “With the alarming increase in fat and sugar consumption around the world, recognizing individuals already predisposed because they carry these genetic mutations could be important for therapeutic intervention and disease management, especially particular at very early stages or even before the We will need more studies to further characterize the roles of the two genes in human fatty liver disease, NASH and human liver cancer and to identify therapeutics that may help patients who are already inherently predisposed to developing the disease.

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Chinese Scientists Uncover Potential New Strategy to Treat Fatty Liver Disease https://rogalevich.org/chinese-scientists-uncover-potential-new-strategy-to-treat-fatty-liver-disease/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/chinese-scientists-uncover-potential-new-strategy-to-treat-fatty-liver-disease/ Тимофей Борзенко The healthcare system in China. Photo: Xinhua. Chinese researchers have developed a ‘detour’ treatment strategy that may help relieve fatty liver symptoms in the future, Xinhua News Agency reported. The two back-to-back papers published in the journal Science Translational Medicine reported a new molecular mechanism correlated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NASH), a […]]]>

Тимофей Борзенко

The healthcare system in China. Photo: Xinhua.

Chinese researchers have developed a ‘detour’ treatment strategy that may help relieve fatty liver symptoms in the future, Xinhua News Agency reported.

The two back-to-back papers published in the journal Science Translational Medicine reported a new molecular mechanism correlated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NASH), a common chronic liver disease that can lead to liver cancer.

An enzyme in the human body called ACC is known to facilitate fat synthesis in liver cells. Previously, scientists tried to design an ACC inhibitor, but it showed an adverse effect of increasing blood fats, according to the study.

Scientists from Wuhan University, led by medical professor Li Hongliang, took a step back and found that expression of a gene named ALOX12 increases the level of ACC.

In another paper, the research team described a small molecule that can deactivate the ALOX12 protein in mouse and non-human primate models and then delay the release of the ACC enzyme.

The study found that treatment with the chemical effectively slowed disease progression in animals and did not cause excessive lipid levels.

Zhang Xiaojing, co-author of two papers, told Xinhua that the results provide proof of concept for using a new class of molecules as next-generation drugs for the treatment of NASH.

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Can non-invasive medical devices help stop liver disease? https://rogalevich.org/can-non-invasive-medical-devices-help-stop-liver-disease/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 18:15:52 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/can-non-invasive-medical-devices-help-stop-liver-disease/ A silent epidemic of liver disease is sweeping the country and the world through an increase in chronic liver disease, such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and its most severe form, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). NASH can lead to advanced fibrosis and liver cancer, liver transplantation and increased risk of cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality, […]]]>

A silent epidemic of liver disease is sweeping the country and the world through an increase in chronic liver disease, such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and its most severe form, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). NASH can lead to advanced fibrosis and liver cancer, liver transplantation and increased risk of cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality, while NAFLD is one of the most common causes of liver disease in states -United. Experts say that around 24% of US adults have NAFLD and about 1.5% to 6.5% of US adults have NASH.

Fortunately, liver disease can often be reversed with early diagnosis and intervention using medical devices called non-invasive tests (NITs) to help in the management of patients with liver disease. The most promising NIT is transient vibration-controlled elastography (VCTE) technology, including measurement of liver stiffness (LSM) by transient elastography (TE), controlled attenuation parameter (CAP) and Spleen stiffness measurement (SSM) as an additional NIT to further improve risk stratification and refine the risk of high-risk varicose veins.

Studies show that detecting and monitoring liver disease using VCTE is a non-invasive, convenient, and cost-effective way for clinicians to quantify liver tissue stiffness and estimate point-of-care liver fat.

Focus on VCTE technology

VCTE combines standardization, clinical performance and accessibility for the early identification of patients, whether in primary care, diabetes clinic or liver clinic, and for the management of patients with liver disease advanced portal hypertension and risk stratification for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).

VCTE technology is essential for detecting and monitoring NAFLD / NASH, alcoholic liver disease (ALD), hepatitis C virus (including post-sustained virologic response [PSVR]), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) / primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and autoimmune hepatitis (HAI) in at-risk populations such as patients with metabolic risk factors and / or harmful alcohol consumption . VCTE technology also offers high value for comprehensive liver health management. This is important given the prevalence and associated costs of underdiagnosed liver disease.

Prevalence and costs of liver disease

Rates of liver damage have been linked to the alarming increase in obesity among adults in the United States and around the world. In 2000, 30.5% of American adults were obese – a body mass index of 30 or higher– which increased in 2015-2016 and led to an increase in diabetes, cardiovascular disease and certain cancers. In 2017-2018, the obesity rate reached 42.4%—Passing 40% for the first time.

Obesity can be devastating to vital organs, causing insulin resistance which leads to a build-up of sugar in the blood and increases the amount of free fatty acids circulating in the blood and liver cells. Common in people with type 2 diabetes, the accumulation of fat in the liver increases the risk of liver fibrosis, cirrhosis, liver cancer, and death.

Costs

Liver damage is now linked to more than $ 100 billion in annual direct costs. A recent study among Medicare Advantage plans found that the annual cost of NAFLD was $ 9,062 for a new diagnosis and $ 5,363 for long-term management versus $ 4,111 per paired check-up. These costs relate to hospitalization and outpatient appointments, emergency department visits, organ transplants, medical procedures or new diagnoses, new medications or changes to existing medications and mortality.

Estimates show that 357 million people will have NASH globally by 2030. Since NAFLD and NASH are so closely linked to obesity, diabetes, and lifestyle, a preventative approach to patient engagement is needed to encourage more positive lifestyle behavior changes.

Addressing behavior change with medical devices

For many patients, diet and exercise can make all the difference. In fact, a 3% reduction in body weight has been associated with an inversion of fat in the liver, while a reduction of over seven% can resolve NASH in many patients.

The progression of liver disease is usually slow, giving patients the opportunity to be well managed by primary care physicians. This has prompted a growing number of healthcare providers to adopt VCTE tools to help stop or reverse liver damage in patients at risk.

Stakeholders could benefit from a VCTE tool that provides test results to help monitor lifestyle modification. The tool is also expected to offer consistent quantitative results to allow clinics to monitor fatty liver disease and provide feedback to patients on changes in their diet and exercise. It is also important that a VCTE tool integrates with EHRs for automatic downloading and storage of exam results to save time, secure data and improve patient follow-up.

The bottom line: As a medical device, a VCTE tool can help fight the epidemic of liver disease, adding value to a practice, improving patient satisfaction, improving outcomes and playing a role. role in creating a more sustainable health system.

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Liver Health Supplements Market Size, Latest Trends with Growth Opportunities 2027 – Oxford spokesperson https://rogalevich.org/liver-health-supplements-market-size-latest-trends-with-growth-opportunities-2027-oxford-spokesperson/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 06:32:00 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/liver-health-supplements-market-size-latest-trends-with-growth-opportunities-2027-oxford-spokesperson/ the Global Liver Health Supplements Market the size is estimated at 827.24 million USD in 2020 and can reach $ 1,077.28 million, with a CAGR of 4.5% from 2021 to 2027. The liver is the largest internal organ that typically finds invertebrates, which play a very crucial role in removing toxins from the body. Improving […]]]>

the Global Liver Health Supplements Market the size is estimated at 827.24 million USD in 2020 and can reach $ 1,077.28 million, with a CAGR of 4.5% from 2021 to 2027. The liver is the largest internal organ that typically finds invertebrates, which play a very crucial role in removing toxins from the body. Improving the health and well-being of the liver and its proper functioning is the top priority for a healthy body. However, the prevalence of chronic liver disease has increased recently due to various factors, such as lower quality of food, increased alcohol consumption and many others. As a result, liver health supplements become a preferable option for improving the healthy and harmonious functioning of the liver in the human body.

The increase in the geriatric population, the high incidence of obesity in children and adults, and the growing trend of consuming fast food and alcohol will increase the demand for liver health supplements, providing a huge growth potential to the global market.

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Factors such as increase in chronic liver disease, including alcoholic liver disease, chronic viral hepatitis, fatty liver disease, liver cancer, and hemochromatosis are expected to drive the global growth of the supplements market. liver health.

Growing consumer awareness of the need for good liver health coupled with increasing government initiatives to promote good health is also fueling the growth of the liver health supplements market in the healthcare and pharmaceutical industries across the world.

However, strict rules and regulations regarding liver health supplements and intense competition among major players may restrain the growth of the global liver health supplements market during the forecast period.

Impact of COVID-19 on the Liver Health Supplements Market:

COVID-19 is a global communicable health disease that has affected almost all industries, including the healthcare and pharmaceutical sectors. The COVID-19 outbreak has increased demand for liver health supplements across the world, primarily in North America and Asia-Pacific. As the coronavirus crises take hold of the world and result in curfews and closures, they have severely affected many companies operating across the world, which has directly affected the production and demand for these supplements. This creates a lot of lucrative opportunities for new players and small scale players to mark their presence in the regional market and offer low prices and high quality products to end users. Therefore, with the outbreak of COVID-19, a significant increase in the demand for these supplements has been observed around the world, which has positively impacted the value of the liver health supplements market in 2020 and the following years.

Scope of the report

The report describes the Liver Health Supplements market research based on product, dosage, and end user.

On the basis of Product, the Liver Health Supplements market has been segmented into –

  • Vitamins and minerals
  • Herbal supplements
  • Others

On the basis of dosage, the liver health supplements market has been segmented into –

  • Capsules
  • Tablets
  • Liquid
  • Others

Depending on the distribution channel, the liver health supplement market has been segmented into –

  • Hospital pharmacies
  • Retail pharmacies
  • Online pharmacies

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Liver Health Supplements Market: Regional Outlook

On the basis of region, the global liver health supplements market has been segmented into five key geographic regions namely, North America, Asia-Pacific, Europe, South America, the Middle East and Africa. In 2020, North America held the largest market share in the liver health supplements market, followed by Europe and Asia-Pacific, due to increased dependence on beverages. alcoholic beverages and a high prevalence of chronic liver disease in the region. On the contrary, Asia-Pacific is expected to post the highest CAGR during the forecast period, owing to the growing awareness of people about healthy products and the increase in the disposable income of individuals, as well as the presence growing online retail platforms for drug supply in the region. .

The major competitors in the liver health supplements market include –

The liver health supplements market is highly fragmented with a large number of small players across the globe. Manufacturers of Vital Liver Health Supplements operating in the global market are –

  • Himalaya Herbal Healthcare
  • Natures Swiss Crafts
  • Enzymedica
  • Thompson (Integria Healthcare)
  • Jarrow Formulas, Inc.
  • The bounty of nature
  • Irwin’s natural
  • Swanson Health Products
  • NATURALife Health Products, Inc.
  • Foods NOW

The Liver Health Supplements market report extensively analyzes the macroeconomic factors and attractiveness of each segment in the market. The report will comprise an in-depth qualitative and quantitative assessment of the segmental / regional outlook with the presence of market players in the segment and the respective region / country. The information concluded in the report includes the entries.

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The Liver Health Supplements Market Report Covers Comprehensive Analysis on:

  • Market segmentation and regional analysis
  • 10 year market size
  • Price Analysis
  • Supply and demand analysis
  • Product lifecycle analysis
  • Porter’s Five Forces and Value Chain Analysis
  • Analysis of developed and emerging economies
  • PEST analysis
  • Factor analysis of the market and forecasts
  • Market opportunities, risks and trends
  • Conclusion and recommendation
  • Regulatory landscape
  • Patent analysis
  • Competition landscape
  • 15+ company profiles

Regional Analysis Of Liver Health Supplements Market Include:

  • North America (United States, Canada, Mexico)
  • South America (Brazil, Argentina, Colombia, Peru, rest of Latin America)
  • Europe (Germany, Italy, France, United Kingdom, Spain, Poland, Russia, Slovenia, Slovakia, Hungary, Czech Republic, Belgium, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, rest of Europe)
  • Asia-Pacific (China, Japan, India, South Korea, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, Vietnam, Myanmar, Cambodia, Philippines, Singapore, Australia and New Zealand, rest of Asia-Pacific)
  • The Middle East and Africa (Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, South Africa, North Africa, rest of the MEA

Liver Health Supplements Market: Target Audience

  • Liver Health Supplement Service Providers
  • Hospitals and diagnostic laboratories
  • Drug Discovery and Development Research Centers
  • Investors and business experts
  • Healthcare Manufacturers, Distributors and Suppliers
  • Specialized publications and magazines
  • Government authorities, associations and organizations

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Main issues addressed

  • What is the market size by various segmentations of Liver Health Supplements by region and respective countries?
  • What are customer buying behavior, key takeaways and market strengths for Porter’s 5 Liver Health Supplements?
  • What are the key opportunities and trends for manufacturers involved in the liver health supplement supply chain?
  • What are the fundamental dynamics (drivers, constraints, opportunities and challenges) of the market?
  • What and how are regulations, programs, patents and policies impacting market growth?
  • What are the upcoming technological solutions influencing market trends? How will existing businesses adapt to new technological change?
  • How will advanced technology impact the liver health supplement market?
  • How has COVID-19 affected the demand and sales for liver health supplements in the global market? Also, the expected number of decrease or increase in the market BPS and the period of recovery expected by the market.
  • Detailed analysis of competitors and their latest launch, and what are the top startups introduced in the target market? In addition, detailed profiling of more than 25 leading and eminent companies in the market.

About Us:

Market Statsville Group (MSG) partners with businesses and society to address their critical risks and challenges to seize the huge opportunities before them. MSG started its work in 2017, and since then the brand has become a pioneer in business consulting and market research services.

We are the leading designer of market research and strategies with the depth and breadth of solutions that perfectly meet all of your needs. MSG provides solutions across a wide range of industry verticals for market sizing, analytics, and incisive business intelligence. MSG’s experienced research analysts are skilled at digging deep and delivering a variety of customizable data that helps you make decisions with clarity, confidence, and impact.

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Exploring the growing burden of liver disease https://rogalevich.org/exploring-the-growing-burden-of-liver-disease/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 14:21:13 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/exploring-the-growing-burden-of-liver-disease/ [ad_1] © iStock / magicmine With one in five people at risk for developing liver disease, Dr Michael Lutz discusses what can be done to combat this growing threat. According to the British Liver Trust, liver disease is the leading cause of death in adults aged 35 to 49. Yet while this statistic is indeed […]]]>


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© iStock / magicmine

With one in five people at risk for developing liver disease, Dr Michael Lutz discusses what can be done to combat this growing threat.

According to the British Liver Trust, liver disease is the leading cause of death in adults aged 35 to 49. Yet while this statistic is indeed shocking, it is equally disturbing to read that 90% of cases of liver disease are in fact preventable. Our liver is an integral part of our overall well-being, responsible for over 500 essential functions in the body, such as helping us detoxify harmful substances in our blood, process food, regulate hormones and fight infections.

Excess alcohol, a diet rich in processed foods, and sedentary behavior are some of the main risk factors associated with liver disease. the liver is severely damaged. Talk to Health Europe, Dr Michael Lutz, CEO and Managing Director of HepaRegenix, reflects on the growing burden of disease, the challenges of diagnostic procedures, and the need for reliable and innovative therapies that can help patients with acute and chronic liver problems.

Can you describe some common types of liver disease and their current burden on health systems?

There are a number of diseases related to the liver and two key factors that can strongly influence their development: food and alcohol, or a combination of both. As the disease progresses, the first stages of deterioration are called non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), including non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). These define a range of conditions caused by a buildup of fat in the liver and are commonly seen in overweight people. NAFLD / NASH has four key stages (F1-F4), each with different clinical manifestations and requiring different diagnostic procedures. As the liver becomes inflamed you may see the first signs of steatosis where fat builds up in liver cells (F1), and if left untreated or undiagnosed it may progress. in fibrosis which can cause scarring of the liver and adjacent blood vessels (F2).

The early stages of liver disease are called non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), including non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) © iStock / Jan-Otto

The most severe cases of liver disease are stage F3 (advanced liver fibrosis) and stage F4 (cirrhosis). Also known as end-stage liver disease, cirrhosis manifests as scarring and irregular lumps or nodules that can affect the functionality of the liver. There are two types of cirrhosis called “compensated” and “decompensated”. One of the main difficulties at this stage of liver disease is that patients who have compensated cirrhosis may not have any symptoms because their liver is able to function relatively well despite the damage. Conversely, the decompensated stage means the damage to the liver is so severe that it cannot function properly, which in turn can lead to many other health complications, including hepatic encephalopathy and bleeding varicose veins. . At this point, patients would need a liver transplant within two to three years.

Patients with advanced fibrosis, or even early stage cirrhosis, may be stable for 10 to 20 years. However, the impact of other health problems incurred, such as hepatic encephalopathy, can lead to deterioration of the liver, as well as other organs, and lead to acute liver failure.

Are there certain demographics or groups that are particularly susceptible to the disease or is lifestyle the main driver of the disease?

The impact of diet and lifestyle on the liver has been well documented for many years. There are reports that have hinted at fast food as the source of the next US pandemic and that over the next 10 to 20 years there will be a huge increase in the number of people with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). , advanced stage fibrosis or cirrhosis. This means that there may be an organ shortage as more people will need a liver transplant.

The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic has also seen a substantial increase in the number of people turning to alcohol to overcome the ‘COVID blues’, particularly in the UK and US.

Can you describe some of the main challenges associated with diagnosis and screening? Should more be done to raise awareness?

Diagnosing the severity of the fibrosis or cirrhosis would require a liver biopsy and subsequent histopathological evaluations, which can be very difficult to determine where to do the liver biopsy in order to get a clear and valid result.

Although NASH can create opportunities for innovation, for regulatory reasons, many pharmaceutical companies have failed in advanced NASH trials due to the difficult nature of liver biopsies and histopathology. Our company is part of the Liver Forum which was created by the pharmaceutical industry and a few other partners to facilitate the development of drugs for the treatment of liver disease. Last year there was a session where people said that histopaths, and the results are like rolling the dice; three pathologists can take a sample, and each can give different results.

In terms of awareness, there are effective initiatives to encourage healthier lifestyles; we have seen a gradual decline in the number of people who smoke over the past 10 to 15 years and we are now seeing similar initiatives regarding sugar taxes. Advocating a healthy lifestyle that incorporates more exercise, less alcohol and red meat is a starting point, but in some countries like the United States, the scale of liver disease is increasing so rapidly that interventions are urgently needed. In the past 10 years alone, cases of liver disease in the United States have increased by around 25% and we expect this to continue to rise if left unchecked.

On your website, you state that there is a huge unmet medical need, mainly due to the lack of treatment options. Can you share any innovations or recent developments that could improve the success rate of treatment for liver disease?

When I joined HepaRegeniX in 2019, the NASH space was very crowded with over 200 companies developing treatments. However, since then many of these companies’ attempts have failed and they have left the NASH space. Our company has embarked on other projects focused on more advanced liver diseases. In the early stages of some liver diseases, regulators are still convinced that if you make changes to your diet and lifestyle, you can stop the disease and essentially heal yourself. Therefore, they are reluctant to motivate and fund companies to create drugs for these patients. Supporting patients with acute or chronic liver failure is another story, and more and more people will need this type of advanced care. We already hear the term “liver tsunami” reflecting the rapid increase in the number of people in need of treatment. Likewise, some reports predict that liver cancer will be the most important cancer over the next 20 years.

There are still companies developing treatments for NASH as well as those trying to “cleanse” fat from the liver or reduce the impact and early symptoms of NAFLD, including treatments for obesity. There are also companies that try to roll back and prevent fibrosis from growing further. Regenerative medicine companies like ours are studying the more severe stages of liver disease to support patients who need it and that is our goal with upcoming clinical trials.

In development, HepaRegenix only works on advanced liver diseases. Can you explain how your therapeutic approach differs from currently approved therapies and more advanced compounds currently in clinical development?

Current therapies for chronic liver disease focus on reducing or eliminating harmful exogenous agents and thus may slow the progression of the disease. For terminal liver disease, transplantation is currently the only curative option. Currently, no therapy can restore the almost infinite regenerative capacity of healthy liver cells. Yet this is exactly the approach we follow at HepaRegeniX: we aim to unlock the regenerative capacity of hepatocytes. Our target is the Mitogen Activated Protein (MAP) Kinase Kinase 4 – in short: MKK4. The foundations of this “first-in-class” approach were laid in the laboratory of Professor Lars Zender at the University Hospital of Tübingen. In cooperation, we have developed a small molecule platform of MKK4 inhibitors. From extensive preclinical studies, we know that restoration of regenerative capacity through inhibition of MKK4 is possible even in severely affected livers. In fact, the evidence we were able to gather in acute and chronic liver disease was very convincing and fully confirmed the therapeutic rationale. More recently, we reported significant benefits in terms of survival and improvement of key liver function parameters in collaboration with the Mayo Clinic. As we embark on our Phase 1 First-In-Human trial which began in August 2021, we see the great potential of MKK4 to treat patients with advanced liver disease.

Dr Michael Lutz
CEO / Managing Director
HepaRegeniX
www.heparegenix.com

This article is taken from issue 20 of Europa Health Quarterly. Click on here to get your free subscription today.




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Promising Phase II Results for Difficult-to-Treat Liver Diseases https://rogalevich.org/promising-phase-ii-results-for-difficult-to-treat-liver-diseases/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 15:16:55 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/promising-phase-ii-results-for-difficult-to-treat-liver-diseases/ [ad_1] CytoDyn shared the positive results of its Phase II clinical study on efficacy of leronlimab against non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The NASH assay met the primary endpoint of proton density fat fraction (PDFF) and the secondary endpoint of cT1. PDFF is an MRI-derived biomarker for fatty deposits, while cT1 is an iron-corrected T1 mapping indicator […]]]>


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CytoDyn shared the positive results of its Phase II clinical study on efficacy of leronlimab against non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH).

The NASH assay met the primary endpoint of proton density fat fraction (PDFF) and the secondary endpoint of cT1. PDFF is an MRI-derived biomarker for fatty deposits, while cT1 is an iron-corrected T1 mapping indicator of liver fibrosis and inflammation. Both endpoints were used to assess the risk of NASH.

Participants received leronlimab each week during the two-part NASH trial. Part I observed a weekly dose of 700 mg versus a double-blind, randomized placebo. Part II looked at a weekly dose of 350 mg versus placebo in an open label study. The first results should be announced soon. Researchers found statistically significant improvement in the 350 mg dose group for both primary and secondary endpoints.

NASH is a chronic liver disease characterized by liver inflammation and hepatocellular bloating (cell damage). This is due to the accumulation of hepatic fat, also called steatosis, which is equal to or greater than 5% of hepatocytes. Even without excessive alcohol consumption, lack of physical activity and unhealthy eating habits can lead to this disease. If left untreated, NASH can progress to end-stage liver disease, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma.

In the United States, about 30-40% of adults are diagnosed with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), while 3-12% live with NASH. The Phase II NASH trial is investigating 22 different indications for solid tumor cancer.

“We are currently analyzing biomarker data including information on the CCR5 haplotype to better understand response rates and mechanism of action. Given that 5% of the world’s population is estimated to have NASH with 20% progressing to cirrhosis, this signal gives hope for therapeutic intervention for this disease, ”said Dr. Christopher P. Recknor, vice president senior executive of clinical operations at CytoDyn, in a statement.

Currently, there is no approved pharmacological treatment for NASH. The available therapies focus primarily on treating co-morbidities, including type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and obesity. Other NASH interventions also focus on lifestyle changes and improved diet.

Leronlimab is a humanized IgG4 mAb that works by binding to CCR5. It has a United States Fast Track designation Food and drug administration for metastatic cancer, especially triple negative breast cancer (mTNBC) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). For HIV, leronlimab is combined with HAART.

After seeking approval in the United States, CytoDyn reportedly intends to seek approval in Brazil, Canada, the Philippines and the United Kingdom as well.

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Drinking 2 Cups of Coffee Daily Reduces Risk of Liver Cancer – Better Life https://rogalevich.org/drinking-2-cups-of-coffee-daily-reduces-risk-of-liver-cancer-better-life/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 12:03:38 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/drinking-2-cups-of-coffee-daily-reduces-risk-of-liver-cancer-better-life/ [ad_1] Each year, approximately 24,500 men and 10,000 women contract liver cancer in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). These numbers have been increasing for several decades and the overall survival rate for this type of cancer is low. The CDC reports that of these annual disease estimates, […]]]>


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Each year, approximately 24,500 men and 10,000 women contract liver cancer in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). These numbers have been increasing for several decades and the overall survival rate for this type of cancer is low. The CDC reports that of these annual disease estimates, about 18,600 men and 9,000 women end up dying from cancer. According to the American Cancer Society (ACS), there is only a 20% relative five-year survival rate for liver cancer in the United States. With this in mind, prevention is extremely important. It turns out that just adding a certain drink to your daily diet could be a good step in lowering your risk of liver cancer. Read on to find out what you should drink on a daily basis.

RELATED: If Your Breath Smells Like This, Get Your Liver Checked, Experts Say.

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If you like to drink coffee on a daily basis, you might be in luck. A 2007 meta-analysis published in the Gastroenterology The journal found that more and more evidence indicates that increasing your coffee intake may protect your liver. Researchers in the meta-analysis looked at nine different studies that were published between 2002 and 2007, involving more than 241,000 people. According to the combined research, the 2007 study found that overall, increasing your coffee intake to two cups per day was associated with a 43% reduction in the risk of liver cancer.

RELATED: If You Notice This On Your Arms Or Legs, Have Your Liver Checked.

close up adult man massaging hands on stomach after feeling pain on white background for healthy and lifestyle concept
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The researchers said the lower risk of liver cancer compared to coffee could be the result of extensive liver protection. According to the study, coffee contains high amounts of antioxidants, such as chlorogenic acids and caffeine, which may protect the liver from damage. The researchers also noted that a US population-based study found that higher coffee consumption was associated with a lower prevalence of abnormal alanine aminotransferase activity, which is a marker of liver injury.

“Therefore, the observed association between coffee consumption and liver cancer could potentially represent an association with liver disease,” the researchers said. “Nonetheless, in a stratified analysis by history of liver disease, coffee consumption was inversely associated with the risk of liver cancer in people with and without a history of liver disease. This finding suggests that coffee consumption may reduce the risk of liver cancer. risk of liver cancer even after acquiring liver disease.

A hand pouring steaming coffee into a cup on a desk when working from home
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Early research suggests that two cups of coffee a day is enough to significantly reduce your risk of liver cancer, but some researchers say you may want to drink a little more for the best effects. A 2021 study published in the BMC Public Health Journal analyzed the coffee habits of more than 494,000 people in a British biomedical database, monitoring their liver health for 11 years. According to the study, coffee drinkers were 21% less likely to develop chronic liver disease, 20% less likely to develop chronic or oily liver disease, and 49% less likely to die from chronic liver disease than those who did not. -coffee drinkers. And the researchers said the maximum benefit was found in people who drank three to four cups a day. While drinking less than that was less effective, drinking more than four cups was not associated with additional benefits.

RELATED: For More Health Tips Delivered Right To Your Inbox, Sign Up For Our Daily Newsletter.

A group of elderly men drinking beer in a bar
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According to the CDC, nearly 4.5 million adults have been diagnosed with some type of liver disease in the United States. Liver disease can be inherited, but liver problems can also be caused by various factors that damage the liver, experts at the Mayo Clinic explain. This includes infections, chronic alcohol abuse, the buildup of fat in the liver, the use of certain medications, and other underlying conditions such as type 2 diabetes.

The Mayo Clinic says that to prevent liver disease you should “drink alcohol in moderation, avoid certain risky behaviors, get vaccinated, use medications wisely, avoid contact with blood and body fluids. other people, keep your food safe, watch out for aerosols, protect your skin, and maintain a healthy weight. ”And although research shows that increasing coffee consumption might also help, some experts warn that you shouldn’t. don’t expect to have better liver health just because you add more cups of coffee to your diet, especially if you maintain other negative habits.

“It’s important that people improve their liver health not just by drinking coffee,” Vanessa Hebditch, policy director of the British Liver Trust, said The Guardian, “but also by reducing your alcohol intake and maintaining a healthy weight through exercise and eating well.”

RELATED: If You Drink Your Coffee Like This, You May Be Increasing Your Cancer Risk, Study Finds.

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Hepatocellular carcinoma: a look at the most common primary liver cancer | Hartford Hospital https://rogalevich.org/hepatocellular-carcinoma-a-look-at-the-most-common-primary-liver-cancer-hartford-hospital/ Mon, 03 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/hepatocellular-carcinoma-a-look-at-the-most-common-primary-liver-cancer-hartford-hospital/ [ad_1] January 03, 2022 By Dr Oscar K. SerranoLiver transplant and hepatobiliary surgeonHartford Hospital Transplant Program and Complete Liver Center Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary liver cancer, accounting for nearly one million cases worldwide. HCC is the sixth most common cancer in the world and the third leading cause of cancer-related death. […]]]>


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January 03, 2022

By Dr Oscar K. Serrano
Liver transplant and hepatobiliary surgeon
Hartford Hospital Transplant Program and Complete Liver Center

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary liver cancer, accounting for nearly one million cases worldwide. HCC is the sixth most common cancer in the world and the third leading cause of cancer-related death. In the United States, it has been estimated that approximately 42,230 new cases will be diagnosed and 30,230 people will die from the disease in 2021.

The most important risk factor for HCC is chronic liver disease or cirrhosis. Globally, the majority of HCC cases are confined to sub-Saharan Africa and East Asia, where there is a high prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. In the United States and Europe, the main risk factors for HCC are infection with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) and alcohol abuse.

More recently, the increase in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease has become an important risk factor for the development of cirrhosis and HCC in the western world. Other risk factors include diabetes and metabolic syndrome, smoking, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection.

Unfortunately, for many patients, the presence of cirrhosis is unknown until it reaches an advanced stage. It is imperative that at-risk populations seek testing to avoid the consequences of late-stage disease. Patients with a known history of HCV or HBV infection, history of intravenous drug use, unprotected sex, alcohol abuse, obesity, diabetes, or syndrome metabolic rate should seek screening for liver disease from their primary care provider.

Unfortunately, patients with HCC may not show any symptoms, especially when detected early in the disease, as part of a formal screening program. Other patients may experience abdominal pain, unexplained weight loss, weakness or fatigue, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes), or a hard lump under the right rib cage, but these patients are in the minority.

Once a patient is deemed at risk for HCC and is enrolled in a monitoring program, serial abdominal imaging and blood tests are the cornerstone of the diagnosis. Typically, a screening ultrasound will be obtained annually in patients at risk. The α-fetoprotein tumor marker is also used as a screening tool to probe patients at high risk for HCC. Abnormalities in any of these tests will require additional imaging, especially abdominal MRI (preferred) or CT scan. HCC is usually diagnosed radiologically with characteristic arterial enhancement and delayed lavage, avoiding the need for a biopsy.

After confirmation of the diagnosis of HCC, the most important prognostic factor is the stage of the disease. CHC is classified according to the Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer Classification System (BCLC), which is useful for making recommendations on treatment options. The BCLC system classifies HCC based on the characteristics and size of the tumor, the patient’s native liver function and performance status, and cancer-related symptoms.

BCLC step groups include:

  • Very early stage (BCLC 0): Patients with a single tumor of less than 2 centimeters, who do not have underlying liver disease and whose performance index is excellent. Surgical resection is generally recommended. Average survival is generally over five years.
  • Early stage (BCLC A): Patients with a single tumor or multiple tumors, each less than 3 centimeters tall and with liver dysfunction. Patients may be candidates for liver transplantation, surgical resection, or regional treatments. Average survival is generally over five years.
  • Intermediate stage (BCLC B): Patients with a large tumor or with several tumors and certain hepatic dysfunctions. Patients are candidates for regional therapies. Average survival is usually 2-3 years.
  • Advanced level (BCLC C): Patients with a tumor that has invaded the portal vein or has spread to other parts of the body, such as the lymph nodes, lungs, and bones. Treatment is usually systemic. Average survival is usually one year.

The treatment of HCC is diverse and strongly depends on the stage of presentation of the BCLC, the patient’s performance status and the treatment goals. Surgery (liver resection or transplantation) has long been the backbone of curative therapies for HCC, giving the best results, with a five-year survival of over 80 percent.

For patients who may not be suitable surgical candidates, who have significant underlying liver disease, or who do not meet criteria for liver transplantation, various locoregional therapies can serve as a gateway to liver transplantation, palliative treatments, or for prolong life. These include microwave or radiofrequency ablation, chemo or transarterial radioembolization, or external beam radiation therapy.

Finally, systemic treatment of HCC has recently developed as our understanding of the molecular footprint of these tumors has improved, which has led to the development of biological agents including monoclonal antibodies, pathway inhibitors. molecular and immunomodulators.

Treatment of HCC is complex and requires a full team of providers from a variety of backgrounds, including hepatology, oncology, surgery, radiation oncology, diagnostic and interventional radiology, and transplantation. Patients with HCC should be referred to a center specializing in liver disease and liver transplantation.

At the Hartford Hospital Transplant Program and Comprehensive Liver Center, we work collaboratively to provide each patient with cutting-edge diagnostic and treatment options that encompass all facets of care, including the most effective screening modalities, the latest locoregional therapies and a minimum of invasive surgical techniques and the possibility of participating in clinical trials that exploit new therapeutic targets in addition to standard treatment. Patients considered at risk for HCC should be followed closely with an active surveillance plan to improve the chances of detecting an early lesion.

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