fatty liver – Rogalevich http://rogalevich.org/ Sat, 26 Mar 2022 12:37:05 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://rogalevich.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.png fatty liver – Rogalevich http://rogalevich.org/ 32 32 Down on Liver Health https://rogalevich.org/down-on-liver-health/ Fri, 18 Mar 2022 10:10:00 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/down-on-liver-health/ You probably know a lot about the heart and brain, but you might be surprised by these facts about another equally crucial organ. Your liver performs 500 vital functions to keep us alive. It processes what we eat, drink, breathe and put on our skin. It cleans our blood, keeps our glucose, hormones, cholesterol, vitamins […]]]>

You probably know a lot about the heart and brain, but you might be surprised by these facts about another equally crucial organ.

Your liver performs 500 vital functions to keep us alive.

It processes what we eat, drink, breathe and put on our skin. It cleans our blood, keeps our glucose, hormones, cholesterol, vitamins and minerals at the right levels, and produces bile to rid the body of toxins and aid in digestion.

The liver also helps fight infections and gives us energy. Impressive, huh?

Liver disease is on the rise.

Compared to other major illnesses, such as heart disease and cancer, deaths from liver disease have soared, rising 400% since 1970. Most cases are preventable, according to the British Liver Trust.

Liver disease isn’t just caused by drinking.

The fact that many people associate liver disease with alcoholism has led to stigma. But, in fact, one in five people drink in a way that could harm them.

In fact, in addition to regularly drinking too much alcohol, the main causes are obesity and viral hepatitis.

There are at least 100 forms of liver disease in the UK.

Some of the most common are alcohol-related liver disease, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (caused by being significantly overweight, which can lead to fatty buildup around the liver), hepatitis (there are several different types) and hepatic steatosis. Cancer.

Most cases of liver cancer occur in people who already have liver disease.

Whatever the initial cause of the disease, inflammation leading to scar tissue is the end result.

This buildup of scar tissue is called cirrhosis. Liver cancer is more common in people with cirrhosis.

What is good for the heart is good for the liver.

Adopting a healthy lifestyle can help prevent liver disease, including following recommended guidelines. There is evidence that losing ten percent of your body weight can improve liver function in people with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

Vaccines are available against hepatitis A, which is often contracted through contaminated food or drink, or against hepatitis B, which can be transmitted through unprotected sex or injection drug use.

Read more: 8 Hacks for a Happier Life

Read more: 4 great exercises for fibromyalgia

Follow the best stories from Reader’s Digest by subscribing to our weekly newsletter

]]>
Mice experiments reveal females produce more than one protein that helps prevent non-alcoholic fatty liver disease https://rogalevich.org/mice-experiments-reveal-females-produce-more-than-one-protein-that-helps-prevent-non-alcoholic-fatty-liver-disease/ Thu, 17 Mar 2022 16:49:32 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/mice-experiments-reveal-females-produce-more-than-one-protein-that-helps-prevent-non-alcoholic-fatty-liver-disease/ One of the most common disorders in the world, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Its progressive form, called “non-alcoholic steatohepatitis” (NASH), affects around 30% of all NAFLD patients, and can lead to cirrhosis and liver cancer. Despite numerous research efforts, we still do not understand the […]]]>

One of the most common disorders in the world, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Its progressive form, called “non-alcoholic steatohepatitis” (NASH), affects around 30% of all NAFLD patients, and can lead to cirrhosis and liver cancer. Despite numerous research efforts, we still do not understand the underlying mechanisms of NAFLD/NASH and therefore lack an effective treatment.

One thing we do know, however, is that it seems to be more common in men than in women, especially premenopausal women. Why this is so is not entirely clear, but current evidence suggests that estrogen, a sex hormone, plays a protective role. On the other hand, the formyl-peptide protein receptor 2 (FPR2) is known to play an important role in mediating inflammatory responses in several organs. However, no studies to date have determined its role in the liver. Could FPR2 be implicated in sex-related differences in NAFLD prevalence and severity?

Addressing this question, a research team led by Prof. Youngmi Jung from Pusan ​​National University, Korea, recently conducted a study using a mouse model, shedding light on the role of FPR2 in NAFLD/NASH and its relationship to observed sex-based differences. This work is among the very few studies of NAFLD that rely on gender-balanced animal experiments rather than the more common male-only designs. This article was posted on January 31, 2022 and was published in Volume 13, Number 578, of the journal Nature Communication on January 31, 2022.

The researchers first found that Fpr2 was highly expressed in the healthy liver of female mice. Moreover, it was expressed differently in the liver of male and female mice fed a special NAFLD-inducing diet. Silence the Fpr2 The gene made male and female mice equally vulnerable to NAFLD, suggesting that FPR2 has a protective effect on the liver.

Interestingly, the researchers also found that the production of FPR2 in the liver is mediated by estrogen. Males supplemented with external estrogen produced more Fpr2 and were more resistant to NAFLD, while females whose ovaries had been removed had reduced liver Fpr2 levels. “Taken together, our results suggest that FPR2 is a potential therapeutic target for the development of pharmacological agents to treat NAFLD/NASH,” says Professor Jung. “Furthermore, our results could aid in the development of gender-based therapies for NASH.”

This unprecedented discovery of female-specific FPR2 production in the liver and its role in NAFLD/NASH resistance will hopefully pave the way not only for new treatments, but also for a more comprehensive and gender sensitive during scientific research. In this regard, Professor Jung remarks: “Our research highlights the pressing need to design and develop better gender-balanced animal experiments, given that sex-specific expression of FPR2 in the liver had been completely overlooked. in previous studies.

Hopefully this marks the beginning of a deeper understanding of NAFLD/NASH and the first steps towards effective sex-based therapies.

Source of the story:

Materials provided by Pusan ​​National University. Original written by Na-hyun Lee. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

]]>
Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) related to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease differs clinically from HCC due to other causes https://rogalevich.org/hepatocellular-carcinoma-hcc-related-to-non-alcoholic-fatty-liver-disease-differs-clinically-from-hcc-due-to-other-causes/ Tue, 15 Mar 2022 07:26:38 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/hepatocellular-carcinoma-hcc-related-to-non-alcoholic-fatty-liver-disease-differs-clinically-from-hcc-due-to-other-causes/ 1. Patients with NAFLD-related HCC have longer disease-free survival than those with HCC from other causes. 2. Tumors from patients with HCC related to NAFLD were often larger in diameter than patients with HCC from other causes. Level of evidence assessment: 1 (Excellent) Summary of the study: This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to compare […]]]>

1. Patients with NAFLD-related HCC have longer disease-free survival than those with HCC from other causes.

2. Tumors from patients with HCC related to NAFLD were often larger in diameter than patients with HCC from other causes.

Level of evidence assessment: 1 (Excellent)

Summary of the study: This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to compare the clinical presentation and outcome of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) due to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) with HCC from other causes. Outcome measures of interest included: proportion of HCC secondary to NAFLD as well as a comparison of patient and tumor characteristics, overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival outcomes, and other measures between NAFLD-related HCC and HCC due to other causes. The proportion of HCC secondary to NAFLD was 15.1% and an increasing trend over time was noted. Patients who had HCC due to NAFLD were older with higher BMI and had a higher likelihood of comorbidities, including diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, or cardiovascular disease, compared to patients with HCC due to other causes. Patients with NAFLD-related HCC also had a higher likelihood of being non-cirrhotic. The tumors of patients with HCC due to NAFLD were larger in diameter and these patients had a higher likelihood of uninodular lesions. OS results did not differ between patients with HCC due to NAFLD and those with HCC from other causes, but disease-free survival was longer in patients with HCC due to NAFLD. Limitations of this study include those intrinsic to the meta-analyses, the exclusion of pediatric populations, and a smaller number of studies from the Southeast Asian and South American regions. Overall, the proportion of HCCs linked to NAFLD is increasing over time and an increase in surveillance strategies would be valuable for high-risk patients with NAFLD.

Click to read the study in The Lancet Oncology

Relevant reading: Hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

In depth [systematic review and meta-analysis]: This systematic review and meta-analysis included 94,636 patients in 61 studies from many countries completed between January 1980 and May 2021. The proportion of HCC secondary to NAFLD was 15.1% (95% confidence interval (CI) , 11.9%-18.9%). Patients with HCC due to NAFLD had higher BMI (mean difference 2.99 kg/m^2, 95% CI 2.20 – 3.78 kg/m^2) and were older ( mean difference 5.62 years, 95% CI 4.63 – 6.61 years). Patients with NAFLD-related HCC had a higher likelihood of comorbidities, including diabetes (odds ratio (OR) 4.31, 95% CI 3.19, 5.80), hypertension (OR 2.84, 95% CI, 2.09 – 3.86), hyperlipidemia (OR 3.43, 95% CI, 2.39 – 4.95) or cardiovascular disease (OR 2.23, 95% CI, 1.43, 3.48) compared to patients with HCC due to other causes. Patients with NAFLD-related HCC also had a higher probability of being non-cirrhotic: 38.5% (95% CI, 27.9% – 50.2%) versus 14.6% (CI at 95%, 8.7% – 23.4%). NAFLD HCC patients often had larger diameter tumors (mean difference 0.67 cm, 95% CI 0.35 to 0.98 cm) and more often uninodular lesions (OR 1.36; CI at 95%, 1.19 to 1.56). Comparison of OS results revealed that there was no difference between the groups (risk ratio (HR) 1.05; 95% CI, 0.92, 1.20). However, patients with NAFLD-related HCC had increased disease-free survival (HR 0.79; 95%, 0.63-0.99).

Picture: PD

©2022 2 Minute Medicine, Inc. All rights reserved. No work may be reproduced without the express written consent of 2 Minute Medicine, Inc. Learn about licensing here. No article should be construed as medical advice and is not intended as such by the authors or by 2 Minute Medicine, Inc.

]]>
Liver Health Supplements Market Size, Latest Trends, Research Insights, Key Profile and Applications by 2030 – The Bollywood Ticket https://rogalevich.org/liver-health-supplements-market-size-latest-trends-research-insights-key-profile-and-applications-by-2030-the-bollywood-ticket/ Mon, 14 Mar 2022 06:06:41 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/liver-health-supplements-market-size-latest-trends-research-insights-key-profile-and-applications-by-2030-the-bollywood-ticket/ the global liver health supplements market the size is estimated at 827.24 million USD in 2020 and can reach $1,077.28 million, with a CAGR of 4.5% from 2021 to 2027. The liver is the largest internal organ that typically finds invertebrates, which play a crucial role in removing toxins from the body. Improving the health […]]]>

the global liver health supplements market the size is estimated at 827.24 million USD in 2020 and can reach $1,077.28 million, with a CAGR of 4.5% from 2021 to 2027. The liver is the largest internal organ that typically finds invertebrates, which play a crucial role in removing toxins from the body. Improving the health and well-being of the liver and keeping it functioning properly is a top priority for a healthy body. However, the prevalence of chronic liver diseases has recently increased due to various factors, such as decreasing food quality, increasing alcohol consumption, and many others. As a result, liver health supplements become a preferable option to enhance the smooth and healthy functioning of the liver in the human body.

Growing geriatric population, high incidence of obesity in children and adults, and increasing inclination towards fast food and alcohol consumption will increase the demand for liver health supplements, providing a enormous potential for growth in the global market.

Get Full Sample PDF Copy of Report: https://www.marketstatsville.com/request-sample/liver-health-supplements-market

Factors such as increase in chronic liver diseases including alcoholic liver disease, chronic viral hepatitis, fatty liver disease, liver cancer and hemochromatosis are expected to drive the global growth of supplements market for liver health.

Growing consumer awareness of the need for good liver health coupled with growing government initiatives to promote good health is also fueling the growth of liver health supplements market in health and pharmaceutical sectors across the world.

However, stringent rules and regulations regarding liver health supplements and intense competition among major players may restrain the growth of the global liver health supplements market during the forecast period.

Impact of COVID-19 on Liver Health Supplements Market:

COVID-19 is a global contagious disease that has affected almost every industry, including healthcare and pharmaceuticals. The COVID-19 outbreak has increased the demand for liver health supplements globally, primarily in North America and Asia-Pacific. As the coronavirus crises engulf the world and lead to curfews and shutdowns, it has severely affected many companies operating across the globe, which has directly affected the production and demand for these supplements. This creates many lucrative opportunities for new players and small-scale players to mark their presence in the regional market and offer low prices and high quality products to end users. Therefore, with the outbreak of COVID-19, a significant increase in the demand for these supplements has been observed globally, which has positively impacted the liver health supplements market value in 2020. and the following years.

Report scope

The report outlines the liver health supplements market study based on product, dosage, and end-user.

Inquire Before Purchase @: vhttps://www.marketstatsville.com/buy-now/liver-health-supplements-market?opt=2950

On the basis of product, the liver health supplements market has been segmented into –

  • Vitamins and minerals
  • herbal supplements
  • Others

On the basis of dosage, the liver health supplements market has been segmented into –

  • capsules
  • Tablets
  • Liquid
  • Others

Depending on the distribution channel, the market for liver health supplements has been segmented into –

  • Hospital pharmacies
  • Retail pharmacies
  • Online pharmacies

Liver Health Supplements Market: Regional Outlook

Based on region, the global liver health supplements market has been segmented into five key geographical regions namely, North America, Asia-Pacific, Europe, South America, Middle East and Africa. In 2020, North America held the largest market share in the liver health supplements market, followed by Europe and Asia-Pacific, owing to the rise in beverage addiction alcohol abuse and a high prevalence of chronic liver disease in the region. On the contrary, Asia-Pacific is expected to show the highest CAGR during the forecast period, due to people’s increasing awareness of healthy products and increasing disposable income of individuals, as well as the presence growth of online retail platforms for drug supply in the region. .

Leading competitors in Liver Health Supplements Market include-

The market for liver health supplements is highly fragmented, with a large number of small players across the globe. Manufacturers of Vital Liver Health Supplements operating in the global market are-

  • Himalayan Herbal Health Care
  • Natures Craft Switzerland
  • Enzymedica
  • Thompson (Integria Healthcare)
  • Jarrow Formulas, Inc.
  • The bounty of nature
  • Irwin Natural
  • Swanson Health Products
  • NATURALife Health Products, Inc.
  • NOW Food

The Liver Health Supplements Market report provides an in-depth analysis of macroeconomic factors and market attractiveness of each segment. The report will include an in-depth qualitative and quantitative assessment of the industry/regional outlook with the presence of market players in the respective segment and region/country. The information concluded in the report includes the entries.

Request for Full Table of Contents and Figures & Graphs @ https://www.marketstatsville.com/table-of-content/liver-health-supplements-market

Liver Health Supplements Market Report Covers Comprehensive Analysis on:

  • Market Segmentation and Regional Analysis
  • 10 year market size
  • Price analysis
  • Supply and demand analysis
  • Product life cycle analysis
  • Porter’s Five Forces and Value Chain Analysis
  • Analysis of developed and emerging economies
  • PEST analysis
  • Factor analysis of the market and forecasts
  • Opportunities, risks and market trends
  • Conclusion and recommendation
  • Regulatory landscape
  • Patent Analysis
  • Competition landscape
  • More than 15 company profiles

Regional Analysis For Liver Health Supplements Market Includes:

  • North America (United States, Canada, Mexico)
  • South America (Brazil, Argentina, Colombia, Peru, Rest of Latin America)
  • Europe (Germany, Italy, France, United Kingdom, Spain, Poland, Russia, Slovenia, Slovakia, Hungary, Czech Republic, Belgium, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Rest of Europe)
  • Asia-Pacific (China, Japan, India, South Korea, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, Vietnam, Myanmar, Cambodia, Philippines, Singapore, Australia and New Zealand, Rest of Asia-Pacific)
  • The Middle East and Africa (Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, South Africa, North Africa, Rest of MEA

Request for Report Description @ https://www.marketstatsville.com/liver-health-supplements-market

Liver Health Supplements Market: Target Audience

  • Liver Health Supplement Service Providers
  • Hospitals and diagnostic laboratories
  • Drug discovery and development research centers
  • Investors and trading experts
  • Manufacturers, Distributors and Healthcare Providers
  • Trade publications and magazines
  • Government authorities, associations and organizations

About Us:

Market Group Statsville (MSG) partners with businesses and society to address their critical risks and challenges in order to seize the enormous opportunities that lie ahead. MSG began its work in 2017, and since then the brand has evolved to become a pioneer in business consulting and market research services.

We are the leading market research and strategy builder with the depth and breadth of solutions that perfectly meet all your needs. MSG provides solutions across a wide range of industry verticals in market sizing, analytics and incisive business intelligence. MSG’s experienced research analysts are skilled at digging deep and providing a variety of customizable data that helps you make decisions with clarity, confidence, and impact.

Contact us:
Eric Martin
416 Standberry Street East,
Perkins, Oklahoma 74059, USA
USA: +1-580-205-2707 | India: +91-702-496-8807
E-mail: [email protected]
MSG Blog https://marketstatsvilleblogs.com/
the Web: https://marketstatsville.com/
LinkedIn | Facebook | Twitter

]]>
World leaders celebrate liver disease successes and prepare for challenges ahead https://rogalevich.org/world-leaders-celebrate-liver-disease-successes-and-prepare-for-challenges-ahead/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 20:14:45 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/world-leaders-celebrate-liver-disease-successes-and-prepare-for-challenges-ahead/ Yale’s liver program began with a biopsy in October 1947, one of the first liver biopsies ever performed. Gerald Klatskin, MD, founded the Liver Study Unit and developed the techniques that allowed him to perform the biopsy, even designing the biopsy needle. Klatskin, who was David Paige Smith Professor at the Yale School of Medicine […]]]>

Yale’s liver program began with a biopsy in October 1947, one of the first liver biopsies ever performed. Gerald Klatskin, MD, founded the Liver Study Unit and developed the techniques that allowed him to perform the biopsy, even designing the biopsy needle. Klatskin, who was David Paige Smith Professor at the Yale School of Medicine (YSM), was also an amateur photographer. During his career, he assembled about 50,000 Kodachromes from 10,000 liver biopsies, said James L. Boyer, MD, FACEP, who trained with Klatskin in 1969.

Boyer, an associate professor of medicine (digestive diseases) and director emeritus of the Yale Liver Center, recalled how Klatskin recorded his data with a McBee Card Co punch card system. were when they were taken,” Boyer said at a talk celebrating Yale’s liver program.

The Yale Diamond Jubilee, Celebrating 75 years of Academic Hepatology at Yale, was held on February 25. The virtual meeting attracted an international roster of presenters and audience members, many of whom were former or current members of the Liver Program. Nearly 350 people registered for the one-day event. Presenters discussed the program’s global impact, its many successes in diagnosing and treating liver disease, while preparing for the challenges ahead.

The day began with welcoming remarks from Michael H. Nathanson, MD, PhD, Gladys Phillips Crofoot Professor of Medicine (Digestive Diseases) and Professor of Cell Biology, and Director of the Yale Liver Center. The keynote address was delivered by Dean Nancy J. Brown, MD.

The Liver Center is one of only three research centers in the country that focuses entirely on the liver and is sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIH/NIDDK). Now in his 36’sand year of funding, the center has 86 members from 24 YSM departments and sections. Of those, 75% have joint posts with other center members, Nathanson said. The three thematic areas of the center are immunology/inflammation, hepatic metabolism and epithelial biology.

Nathanson pointed to the growing need for liver care in Connecticut. In the past year, one in seven people discharged from Yale New Haven Hospital had a primary or secondary liver diagnosis; The Yale Liver Tumor Committee discussed 619 patients; 2,170 liver-related interventional radiology procedures were performed; and 1,024 liver biopsies were reviewed. Yale has 65 outpatient liver clinics each week, including fatty liver clinics; liver cancer; Gaucher disease and other inherited liver diseases; viral hepatitis; liver transplant; alcohol and addiction in liver disease; and undiagnosed liver disease.

Today, the Yale Liver Center is more diverse than ever, Nathanson said. Of the clinical hepatology faculty members, half are women and more than 20% belong to underrepresented minorities.

One of its pioneering wives, Guadalupe Garcia-Tsao, MD, FRCP, Professor of Medicine (Digestive Diseases) and Chief of Digestive Diseases at VA-CT Hospital in West Haven, discussed groundbreaking hypertension research portal that she conducted with her mentor, Roberto Groszmann, MD. Garcia-Tsao also reported on the VA Hospital’s clinical practice of evaluating all veterans for hepatitis C (HCV) risk factors. The West Haven VA was one of four National Hepatitis C Resource Centers that created and implemented performance measures and initiatives to ensure patients with HCV were diagnosed and treated, a- she declared. Currently, about 90% of veterans with HCV have been treated and cured, she said.

The clinical practice also includes a tele-hepatology clinic that allows West Haven hepatologists to speak to veterans at clinics in central and western Massachusetts. “We can save patients a lot of time that it would take them to travel to us,” she said.

A tumor tracking system, based on radiology reports, was first implemented in West Haven VA, and has been expanded to include many other sites. The system was created by Tamar Taddei, MD, who will succeed Garcia-Tsao as VA Liver Chief beginning in July 2022.

In his presentation, Mario Strazzabosco, MD, PhD, professor of medicine and co-director of the Yale Liver Center, discussed future challenges in the diagnosis and treatment of liver disease. “Despite the tremendous therapeutic advances generated by academic hepatology, liver disease remains a growing global and national healthcare challenge, and the second leading cause of lost working life years,” Strazzabosco said. He urged the medical community to focus on prevention, screening, early diagnosis and therapy. “Clinical guidance in patients with liver disease is always oriented towards advanced disease and its complications, whereas the early and reversible stages of disease are often ignored and overlooked,” he explained. Liver disease results from potentially preventable epidemics of viral hepatitis, alcohol consumption, obesity, diabetes, and inequalities in underserved populations, including lack of health insurance that does not allow for a proper prevention.

Addressing the stigma often associated with liver disease should also be a priority, he added. Fear of being stigmatized causes people to delay or avoid seeing a doctor, and can lead to an increase in unhealthy behaviors as well as social isolation. As a result, more people will have serious liver disease in the future, he said.

As an introduction to subsequent sessions, Strazzabosco showed that liver research at Yale transcends the boundaries of specialties, sections, and departments. He reminded the audience that although improvements in medicine have thus far been driven by specialization, this will not hold in a future where hepatology must adopt models of care geared towards centered liver care. on the patient beyond traditional medical boundaries. The Liver Center can facilitate this transition by ensuring that clinical practice and research remain close, because there is research in health care and health care in research, he said.

]]>
World leaders celebrate liver disease successes and prepare for challenges ahead https://rogalevich.org/world-leaders-celebrate-liver-disease-successes-and-prepare-for-challenges-ahead-2/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 18:55:09 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/world-leaders-celebrate-liver-disease-successes-and-prepare-for-challenges-ahead-2/ Yale’s liver program began with a biopsy in October 1947, one of the first liver biopsies ever performed. Gerald Klatskin, MD, founded the Liver Study Unit and developed the techniques that allowed him to perform the biopsy, even designing the biopsy needle. Klatskin, who was David Paige Smith Professor at the Yale School of Medicine […]]]>

Yale’s liver program began with a biopsy in October 1947, one of the first liver biopsies ever performed. Gerald Klatskin, MD, founded the Liver Study Unit and developed the techniques that allowed him to perform the biopsy, even designing the biopsy needle. Klatskin, who was David Paige Smith Professor at the Yale School of Medicine (YSM), was also an amateur photographer. During his career, he assembled about 50,000 Kodachromes from 10,000 liver biopsies, said James L. Boyer, MD, FACEP, who trained with Klatskin in 1969.

Boyer, an associate professor of medicine (digestive diseases) and director emeritus of the Yale Liver Center, recalled how Klatskin recorded his data with a McBee Card Co punch card system. were when they were taken,” Boyer said at a talk celebrating Yale’s liver program.

The Yale Diamond Jubilee, Celebrating 75 years of Academic Hepatology at Yale, was held on February 25. The virtual meeting attracted an international roster of presenters and audience members, many of whom were former or current members of the Liver Program. Nearly 350 people registered for the one-day event. Presenters discussed the program’s global impact, its many successes in diagnosing and treating liver disease, while preparing for the challenges ahead.

The day began with welcoming remarks from Michael H. Nathanson, MD, PhD, Gladys Phillips Crofoot Professor of Medicine (Digestive Diseases) and Professor of Cell Biology, and Director of the Yale Liver Center. The keynote address was delivered by Dean Nancy J. Brown, MD.

The Liver Center is one of only three research centers in the country that focuses entirely on the liver and is sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIH/NIDDK). Now in his 36’sand year of funding, the center has 86 members from 24 YSM departments and sections. Of those, 75% have joint posts with other center members, Nathanson said. The three thematic areas of the center are immunology/inflammation, hepatic metabolism and epithelial biology.

Nathanson pointed to the growing need for liver care in Connecticut. In the past year, one in seven people discharged from Yale New Haven Hospital had a primary or secondary liver diagnosis; The Yale Liver Tumor Committee discussed 619 patients; 2,170 liver-related interventional radiology procedures were performed; and 1,024 liver biopsies were reviewed. Yale has 65 outpatient liver clinics each week, including fatty liver clinics; liver cancer; Gaucher disease and other inherited liver diseases; viral hepatitis; liver transplant; alcohol and addiction in liver disease; and undiagnosed liver disease.

Today, the Yale Liver Center is more diverse than ever, Nathanson said. Of the clinical hepatology faculty members, half are women and more than 20% belong to underrepresented minorities.

One of its pioneering wives, Guadalupe Garcia-Tsao, MD, FRCP, Professor of Medicine (Digestive Diseases) and Chief of Digestive Diseases at VA-CT Hospital in West Haven, discussed groundbreaking hypertension research portal that she conducted with her mentor, Roberto Groszmann, MD. Garcia-Tsao also reported on the VA Hospital’s clinical practice of evaluating all veterans for hepatitis C (HCV) risk factors. The West Haven VA was one of four National Hepatitis C Resource Centers that created and implemented performance measures and initiatives to ensure patients with HCV were diagnosed and treated, a- she declared. Currently, about 90% of veterans with HCV have been treated and cured, she said.

The clinical practice also includes a tele-hepatology clinic that allows West Haven hepatologists to speak to veterans at clinics in central and western Massachusetts. “We can save patients a lot of time that it would take them to travel to us,” she said.

A tumor tracking system, based on radiology reports, was first implemented in West Haven VA, and has been expanded to include many other sites. The system was created by Tamar Taddei, MD, who will succeed Garcia-Tsao as VA Liver Chief beginning in July 2022.

In his presentation, Mario Strazzabosco, MD, PhD, professor of medicine and co-director of the Yale Liver Center, discussed future challenges in the diagnosis and treatment of liver disease. “Despite the tremendous therapeutic advances generated by academic hepatology, liver disease remains a growing global and national healthcare challenge, and the second leading cause of lost working life years,” Strazzabosco said. He urged the medical community to focus on prevention, screening, early diagnosis and therapy. “Clinical guidance in patients with liver disease is always oriented towards advanced disease and its complications, whereas the early and reversible stages of disease are often ignored and overlooked,” he explained. Liver disease results from potentially preventable epidemics of viral hepatitis, alcohol consumption, obesity, diabetes, and inequalities in underserved populations, including lack of health insurance that does not allow for a proper prevention.

Addressing the stigma often associated with liver disease should also be a priority, he added. Fear of being stigmatized causes people to delay or avoid seeing a doctor, and can lead to an increase in unhealthy behaviors as well as social isolation. As a result, more people will have serious liver disease in the future, he said.

As an introduction to subsequent sessions, Strazzabosco showed that liver research at Yale transcends the boundaries of specialties, sections, and departments. He reminded the audience that although improvements in medicine have thus far been driven by specialization, this will not hold in a future where hepatology must adopt models of care geared towards centered liver care. on the patient beyond traditional medical boundaries. The Liver Center can facilitate this transition by ensuring that clinical practice and research remain close, because there is research in health care and health care in research, he said.

]]>
High Fructose Intake May Trigger Fatty Liver Disease https://rogalevich.org/high-fructose-intake-may-trigger-fatty-liver-disease/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 18:40:15 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/high-fructose-intake-may-trigger-fatty-liver-disease/ Adding high fructose beverages to a diet that already includes a high fat content may accelerate the risk of foie gras disease, according to scientists from the University of Barcelona. What there is to know: High Fructose Intake May Increase Risk of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Diseasein which too much fat is stored in liver cells. […]]]>

Adding high fructose beverages to a diet that already includes a high fat content may accelerate the risk of foie gras disease, according to scientists from the University of Barcelona.

What there is to know:

  • High Fructose Intake May Increase Risk of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Diseasein which too much fat is stored in liver cells.

  • High fructose corn syrup is one of the most common sweeteners in the food industry and is used for sweeten many products despite scientific evidence that it is associated with metabolic disorders that are risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

  • The researchers found that consumption a diet high in fructose for long periods of time may result in deterioration of the layer of cells that creates the intestinal barrier that prevents bacteria and toxins from entering the bloodstream and affecting the liver.

  • Fatty liver disease can lead to liver inflammation and liver damage, resulting in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, one more aggressive disease which in turn can evolve into scarring of the liver (cirrhosis), liver cancerand liver failure.

  • Severe fatty liver disease and liver tumors deterioration of the intestinal barrier created by excessive consumption of fructose can be avoided with medications.

This is a summary of the article, “A New Study Relates Liquid Fructose Intake to Fatty Liver Disease“, published in Molecular Nutrition and Food Research on March 4, 2022. The full article can be found at newswise.com.

For more information, follow Medscape on Facebook, Twitter, instagramand YouTube.

]]>
Supporting the 3rd leading cause of cancer-related death https://rogalevich.org/supporting-the-3rd-leading-cause-of-cancer-related-death/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 15:18:52 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/supporting-the-3rd-leading-cause-of-cancer-related-death/ Liver cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, and the incidence of primary liver cancer in the United States has tripled over the past four decades. While chronic viral hepatitis is the primary route to liver cancer in the United States, non-infectious causes such as morbid obesity, type 2 diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty […]]]>

Liver cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, and the incidence of primary liver cancer in the United States has tripled over the past four decades. While chronic viral hepatitis is the primary route to liver cancer in the United States, non-infectious causes such as morbid obesity, type 2 diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and non-infectious steatohepatitis associated alcoholism (NASH) increased rapidly. We will describe each of these pathways, starting with viral hepatitis (HCV and HBV) and alcoholic cirrhosis.


There is a morbid saying that cancer eventually affects us all, unless something else affects us first.

While some cancers currently have no accessible prevention, some can be effectively prevented. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of those that can be prevented, but once HCC is established and symptomatic, survival rates drop sharply. While liver cancer is the 8and location of cancer site by prevalence (Figure 1), this is the 3rd leading cause of death (Figure 2). HCC has a high mortality profile with a median survival after diagnosis of 6-20 months, and in the United States it has a 5-year survival rate of only 10% (Golabi, et al., 2017)

Figure 1. Top 10 cancer sites by case (Sung et al, 2021)

Top 10 cancer sites by death

Figure 2. Top 10 cancer sites by death (Sung et al, 2021)

The COVID-19 pandemic has rightly occupied the minds and efforts of nearly everyone in healthcare for the past two years, but HCC has not gone away and continues to cause daily damage. . HCC was on 4and leading cause of cancer-related death in 2019 (Yang et al., 2019), and has been steadily increasing – it has tripled in the United States (Rawla, Sunkara, Muralidharan & Raj, 2018).

Although your daily chance of encountering a patient with HCC is still small, it increases year by year and there is a serious risk of missing the window of opportunity to prevent full-blown HCC.

This blog will describe how to be alert to the causes and cases of HCC, and we will provide you with tools and resources to help you identify HCC, ways to connect your patient with appropriate specialists, and help you find appropriate studies and trials for your patient.

There are four main HCC risk factors:

  1. Hepatitis B (HBV)
  2. Hepatitis C (HCV)
  3. Excessive consumption of alcohol
  4. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) resulting in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH)

How likely are you to encounter hepatocellular carcinoma in patients?

In the near future, it is unlikely that any specific patient you see will already have HCC. That’s great, but it’s also a problem because you’re less likely to recognize it immediately. For HCC, delay is the killer.

However, you are very likely to see a patient who, regardless of their primary complaint, is already on one or more of the four main HCC pathways. The picture is also skewed when race is taken into account – while the overall rate of HBV infection has declined significantly since 1991, it remains a concern for the African American population. In 2017, non-Hispanic African Americans were 1.5 times more likely to die from viral hepatitis than whites, and almost twice as likely to die from HCV. (HHS-OMH”Hepatitis and African Americans”)

Anything you can do to increase HBV vaccination rates and prevent HCV infection will help steer your patients away from the viral pathway. It is therefore important to use screening tests for HBV and HCV and to strongly encourage HBV vaccination even if patients are not in high-risk categories. Likewise, addressing alcohol use and encouraging your patients to follow guidelines will help steer them away from alcohol’s path to HCC.

the NAFLD/NASH pathway talks about lifestyle changes that are inherently healthier and worth discussing. Discussing healthy eating, limiting portion sizes, and maintaining a healthy weight with your patients can help steer them away from this path.

Patient history that should raise your index of suspicion includes past unprotected sex, use of needles, binge drinking or binge drinking, or increasing obesity. However, it is important to keep in mind that many patients who had no obvious risk factors in their history nevertheless went on to have HCC. Although atypical, HCC can be the result of maternal HBV infection or HCV transmitted to children. For an example, see “Better off bald: a life in 147 days

How to discuss staging with patients

Discussing staging with patients can be difficult, and the literature is often either aimed at clinicians or contains misleading information. Blue Faery provides clinically accurate yet understandable materials to help you describe the staging and help the patient understand where they are on the spectrum.

These materials include:

  • The HCC patient education brochures is written in plain language and intended to be read by the patient.
  • The Blue Faery and Exelixis staging discussion pad contains anatomical graphics and easy-to-understand text. Each double-sided sheet allows the doctor to add notes that his patient can use after the appointment.
  • the Liver Cancer Patient Resource Guide is a 20-page booklet containing relevant explanations and resources for HCC patients and their caregivers.

Blue Faery will send these documents free of charge to any doctor who requests them.

How to Find Hepatocellular Carcinoma Specialists, Treatment Options and Clinical Trials

Treatment of HCC is best approached with a multidisciplinary team coordinated by a primary care physician. The most effective approach will likely require the expertise of multiple healthcare professionals, including the primary care physician, and may include an oncologist with experience in HCC, gastroenterologist, hepatologist, radiologist interventionist, a radiation oncologist, a surgical oncologist and a transplant surgeon.

Where to find clinical trials specific to hepatocellular carcinoma

To find all clinical trials, the best option is clinicaltrials.gov, but this website can be confusing and difficult to navigate. To help physicians guide their patients to relevant trials, Blue Faery has a custom HCC clinical trial browser.

Where can patients find community support?

Patient communities are very helpful in providing patients with practical guidance for their care journey and are often a source of emotional support from people who understand the experience.

the Blue Fairy Liver Cancer Community is a free, HIPAA-compliant online community where patients and caregivers are invited to join and seek or exchange relevant information about HCC care. Members ask questions, discuss concerns and find common ground along their cancer journey. Forum moderators include Community Ambassadors who were former caregivers of HCC patients.

For individual patient support, Blue Faery has partnered with Imerman Angels, a non-profit organization that provides peer-to-peer support services to the liver cancer community. Blue Faery and Imerman Angels believe that no one should face cancer alone.

Conclusion

With proper screening, testing and inoculation, the viral pathway to HCC can often be interrupted. Blue Faery provides free, patient-readable and clinically accurate materials to help physicians discuss their patients’ staging, options and resources.

]]>
Long or irregular periods can put a woman’s liver at risk – Consumer Health News https://rogalevich.org/long-or-irregular-periods-can-put-a-womans-liver-at-risk-consumer-health-news/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 12:44:36 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/long-or-irregular-periods-can-put-a-womans-liver-at-risk-consumer-health-news/ FRIDAY, March 4, 2022 (HealthDay News) — According to a new study, women with long or irregular periods are at an increased risk of contracting a serious condition called non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic disease in which excess fat builds up in the liver. It affects about 24% […]]]>

FRIDAY, March 4, 2022 (HealthDay News) — According to a new study, women with long or irregular periods are at an increased risk of contracting a serious condition called non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic disease in which excess fat builds up in the liver. It affects about 24% of American adults, according to the March 3 report in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism.

“The results of our study show that long or irregular menstrual cycles may be associated with an increased risk of developing NAFLD, and this link was not explained by obesity,” said Dr. Seungho Ryu of the Kangbuk Samsung Hospital at Sungkyunkwan University Medical School in Seoul, South Korea.

“Previous studies have shown that long or irregular menstrual cycles are associated with type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, but our study is the first to find a link between long or irregular menstrual cycles and NAFLD,” Ryu noted. in a press release.

NAFLD that is not caused by heavy alcohol consumption may progress to chronic liver damage and is associated with a higher risk of death. There are no approved drugs to treat the condition, so diet and exercise are the standard of care.

For the study, the researchers analyzed data from more than 72,000 women under the age of 40. About 28% of women had long or irregular menstrual cycles and 7% had NAFLD.

After four years of follow-up, new cases of NAFLD had been diagnosed in nearly 9% of women. The researchers concluded that there was an association between long or irregular menstrual cycles in young premenopausal women and an increased risk of NAFLD.

“Young women with long or irregular menstrual cycles may benefit from lifestyle changes to reduce the risk of NAFLD as well as other cardiometabolic diseases,” Ryu concluded.

More information

There’s more on NAFLD at the US National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.

THE SOURCE: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolismpress release, March 3, 2022

]]>
Fatty liver disease: four signs of the disease explained https://rogalevich.org/fatty-liver-disease-four-signs-of-the-disease-explained/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 15:08:11 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/fatty-liver-disease-four-signs-of-the-disease-explained/ Warning signs that suggest you are at risk of developing fatty liver disease. Accumulation of fat in the liver can cause non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a condition seen in overweight or obese people. NAFLD is not caused by alcohol, but if left untreated, it can lead to cirrhosis resembling liver damage caused by excessive […]]]>

Warning signs that suggest you are at risk of developing fatty liver disease.

Accumulation of fat in the liver can cause non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a condition seen in overweight or obese people.

NAFLD is not caused by alcohol, but if left untreated, it can lead to cirrhosis resembling liver damage caused by excessive alcohol consumption.

However, foods and drinks containing alcohol or sugar can make the situation worse, so it is advisable to limit their consumption.

NAFLD is the most common liver disease in the world.

More than 90% of obese people, 60% of diabetics and 20% of people with a healthy weight suffer from this disease.

The human liver normally contains some fat, but when fat exceeds 5% of liver weight, fatty liver can develop.

In the early stages, NAFLD usually has no symptoms, but it can be detected by a liver function test from the blood sample.

The warning signs appear when it progresses to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) or fibrosis in which the liver has become inflamed.

A person with NASH may experience:

  1. extremely tired,
  2. tiredness,
  3. pain in the upper right of the belly on the lower right side of the ribs,
  4. and lose weight for no reason.

Prolonged fibrosis and persistent inflammation will cause cirrhosis where the liver is severely scarred and damaged.

Permanent damage can lead to liver cancer, liver failure, and ultimately death.

Symptoms of cirrhosis can include:

  • itchy skin,
  • edema (swelling of the legs or stomach),
  • and jaundice (the skin and the whites of the eyes turn yellow).

We don’t know how mild fatty liver disease develops into serious disease such as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and liver fibrosis.

To understand the process, the researchers performed a genetic analysis of hepatocytes, the main functional cells of the liver.

Professor Stephan Herzig, co-author of the study, said:

“Understanding the mechanism by which this condition becomes fatal is essential in our quest to find therapeutic solutions and preventive measures.”

The research team developed a method targeting particular nodes of the protein network to halt disease progression or even prevent fibrosis.

A network of proteins called “transcription factors” is involved in the process of hepatocyte reprogramming.

Failure of the process could lead to dysfunction of hepatocyte cells.

For example, during the development of NASH, hepatocyte cells lose their identity.

Dr Ana Alfaro, the first author of the study, said:

“These findings are important because they unravel the cellular mechanisms underlying non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.

Knowing the role of protein networks and the loss of hepatocyte identity gives us potential intervention targets for the development of effective therapies.

The study was published in the journal Cell metabolism (Loft et al., 2021).

]]>