liver cancer – Rogalevich http://rogalevich.org/ Sat, 26 Mar 2022 12:37:05 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://rogalevich.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.png liver cancer – Rogalevich http://rogalevich.org/ 32 32 Down on Liver Health https://rogalevich.org/down-on-liver-health/ Fri, 18 Mar 2022 10:10:00 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/down-on-liver-health/ You probably know a lot about the heart and brain, but you might be surprised by these facts about another equally crucial organ. Your liver performs 500 vital functions to keep us alive. It processes what we eat, drink, breathe and put on our skin. It cleans our blood, keeps our glucose, hormones, cholesterol, vitamins […]]]>

You probably know a lot about the heart and brain, but you might be surprised by these facts about another equally crucial organ.

Your liver performs 500 vital functions to keep us alive.

It processes what we eat, drink, breathe and put on our skin. It cleans our blood, keeps our glucose, hormones, cholesterol, vitamins and minerals at the right levels, and produces bile to rid the body of toxins and aid in digestion.

The liver also helps fight infections and gives us energy. Impressive, huh?

Liver disease is on the rise.

Compared to other major illnesses, such as heart disease and cancer, deaths from liver disease have soared, rising 400% since 1970. Most cases are preventable, according to the British Liver Trust.

Liver disease isn’t just caused by drinking.

The fact that many people associate liver disease with alcoholism has led to stigma. But, in fact, one in five people drink in a way that could harm them.

In fact, in addition to regularly drinking too much alcohol, the main causes are obesity and viral hepatitis.

There are at least 100 forms of liver disease in the UK.

Some of the most common are alcohol-related liver disease, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (caused by being significantly overweight, which can lead to fatty buildup around the liver), hepatitis (there are several different types) and hepatic steatosis. Cancer.

Most cases of liver cancer occur in people who already have liver disease.

Whatever the initial cause of the disease, inflammation leading to scar tissue is the end result.

This buildup of scar tissue is called cirrhosis. Liver cancer is more common in people with cirrhosis.

What is good for the heart is good for the liver.

Adopting a healthy lifestyle can help prevent liver disease, including following recommended guidelines. There is evidence that losing ten percent of your body weight can improve liver function in people with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

Vaccines are available against hepatitis A, which is often contracted through contaminated food or drink, or against hepatitis B, which can be transmitted through unprotected sex or injection drug use.

Read more: 8 Hacks for a Happier Life

Read more: 4 great exercises for fibromyalgia

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Mice experiments reveal females produce more than one protein that helps prevent non-alcoholic fatty liver disease https://rogalevich.org/mice-experiments-reveal-females-produce-more-than-one-protein-that-helps-prevent-non-alcoholic-fatty-liver-disease/ Thu, 17 Mar 2022 16:49:32 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/mice-experiments-reveal-females-produce-more-than-one-protein-that-helps-prevent-non-alcoholic-fatty-liver-disease/ One of the most common disorders in the world, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Its progressive form, called “non-alcoholic steatohepatitis” (NASH), affects around 30% of all NAFLD patients, and can lead to cirrhosis and liver cancer. Despite numerous research efforts, we still do not understand the […]]]>

One of the most common disorders in the world, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Its progressive form, called “non-alcoholic steatohepatitis” (NASH), affects around 30% of all NAFLD patients, and can lead to cirrhosis and liver cancer. Despite numerous research efforts, we still do not understand the underlying mechanisms of NAFLD/NASH and therefore lack an effective treatment.

One thing we do know, however, is that it seems to be more common in men than in women, especially premenopausal women. Why this is so is not entirely clear, but current evidence suggests that estrogen, a sex hormone, plays a protective role. On the other hand, the formyl-peptide protein receptor 2 (FPR2) is known to play an important role in mediating inflammatory responses in several organs. However, no studies to date have determined its role in the liver. Could FPR2 be implicated in sex-related differences in NAFLD prevalence and severity?

Addressing this question, a research team led by Prof. Youngmi Jung from Pusan ​​National University, Korea, recently conducted a study using a mouse model, shedding light on the role of FPR2 in NAFLD/NASH and its relationship to observed sex-based differences. This work is among the very few studies of NAFLD that rely on gender-balanced animal experiments rather than the more common male-only designs. This article was posted on January 31, 2022 and was published in Volume 13, Number 578, of the journal Nature Communication on January 31, 2022.

The researchers first found that Fpr2 was highly expressed in the healthy liver of female mice. Moreover, it was expressed differently in the liver of male and female mice fed a special NAFLD-inducing diet. Silence the Fpr2 The gene made male and female mice equally vulnerable to NAFLD, suggesting that FPR2 has a protective effect on the liver.

Interestingly, the researchers also found that the production of FPR2 in the liver is mediated by estrogen. Males supplemented with external estrogen produced more Fpr2 and were more resistant to NAFLD, while females whose ovaries had been removed had reduced liver Fpr2 levels. “Taken together, our results suggest that FPR2 is a potential therapeutic target for the development of pharmacological agents to treat NAFLD/NASH,” says Professor Jung. “Furthermore, our results could aid in the development of gender-based therapies for NASH.”

This unprecedented discovery of female-specific FPR2 production in the liver and its role in NAFLD/NASH resistance will hopefully pave the way not only for new treatments, but also for a more comprehensive and gender sensitive during scientific research. In this regard, Professor Jung remarks: “Our research highlights the pressing need to design and develop better gender-balanced animal experiments, given that sex-specific expression of FPR2 in the liver had been completely overlooked. in previous studies.

Hopefully this marks the beginning of a deeper understanding of NAFLD/NASH and the first steps towards effective sex-based therapies.

Source of the story:

Materials provided by Pusan ​​National University. Original written by Na-hyun Lee. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

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Exelixis throws in the towel on early-stage liver cancer after final reading shows OS flop – Endpoints News https://rogalevich.org/exelixis-throws-in-the-towel-on-early-stage-liver-cancer-after-final-reading-shows-os-flop-endpoints-news/ Tue, 15 Mar 2022 10:36:01 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/exelixis-throws-in-the-towel-on-early-stage-liver-cancer-after-final-reading-shows-os-flop-endpoints-news/ The door to a label expansion for Exelixis’ Cabometyx is now completely closed. Exelixis held out a glimmer of hope – however slim – in the summer of last year, when it published mixed results from an interim reading of a phase III trial testing a combination of Cabometyx and Tecentriq from Roche versus Bayer’s […]]]>

The door to a label expansion for Exelixis’ Cabometyx is now completely closed.

Exelixis held out a glimmer of hope – however slim – in the summer of last year, when it published mixed results from an interim reading of a phase III trial testing a combination of Cabometyx and Tecentriq from Roche versus Bayer’s Nexavar in previously untreated liver cancer. But the final analysis turned out to be equally disappointing, as the combo was tied to “neither improvement nor detriment to the operating system”.

No numbers were provided – they are on file for a later medical meeting – but biotechnology has made it clear that this is now the end of the road.

Based on this OS result and the rapidly changing treatment landscape for previously untreated advanced HCC, Exelixis does not intend to submit an additional New Drug Application to the Food and Drug Administration ( FDA) of the United States.

Cabometyx, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor that hits a range of targets, has seen more than its share of ups and downs throughout the development journey. Two years before its first approval for second-line kidney cancer in 2016, the drug failed a key trial in prostate cancer.

Yet Exelixis continued to push for new indications, including through combined checkpoint approaches – leading to additional approvals in previously treated hepatocellular carcinoma (for liver cancer patients who have previously treated with Nexavar) and first-line renal cell carcinoma (in combination with Bristol Myers Squibb’s PD-1 Opdivo).

Vicki Goodman

The latest study, dubbed COSMIC-312, recruited 837 patients and focused on the first-line HCC setting.

Meanwhile, Cabometyx plus Tecentriq reduced the risk of disease progression or death by 37% compared to Nexavar. But it didn’t reach statistical significance on the OS, hinting at the end results – Exelixis admitted at the time that the probability of reaching the end point in the final scan was low.

“(W)e remain steadfast on our journey to further therapies for this and other difficult-to-treat cancers,” said Vicki Goodman, Chief Medical Officer.

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Liver Health Supplements Market Size, Latest Trends, Research Insights, Key Profile and Applications by 2030 – The Bollywood Ticket https://rogalevich.org/liver-health-supplements-market-size-latest-trends-research-insights-key-profile-and-applications-by-2030-the-bollywood-ticket/ Mon, 14 Mar 2022 06:06:41 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/liver-health-supplements-market-size-latest-trends-research-insights-key-profile-and-applications-by-2030-the-bollywood-ticket/ the global liver health supplements market the size is estimated at 827.24 million USD in 2020 and can reach $1,077.28 million, with a CAGR of 4.5% from 2021 to 2027. The liver is the largest internal organ that typically finds invertebrates, which play a crucial role in removing toxins from the body. Improving the health […]]]>

the global liver health supplements market the size is estimated at 827.24 million USD in 2020 and can reach $1,077.28 million, with a CAGR of 4.5% from 2021 to 2027. The liver is the largest internal organ that typically finds invertebrates, which play a crucial role in removing toxins from the body. Improving the health and well-being of the liver and keeping it functioning properly is a top priority for a healthy body. However, the prevalence of chronic liver diseases has recently increased due to various factors, such as decreasing food quality, increasing alcohol consumption, and many others. As a result, liver health supplements become a preferable option to enhance the smooth and healthy functioning of the liver in the human body.

Growing geriatric population, high incidence of obesity in children and adults, and increasing inclination towards fast food and alcohol consumption will increase the demand for liver health supplements, providing a enormous potential for growth in the global market.

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Factors such as increase in chronic liver diseases including alcoholic liver disease, chronic viral hepatitis, fatty liver disease, liver cancer and hemochromatosis are expected to drive the global growth of supplements market for liver health.

Growing consumer awareness of the need for good liver health coupled with growing government initiatives to promote good health is also fueling the growth of liver health supplements market in health and pharmaceutical sectors across the world.

However, stringent rules and regulations regarding liver health supplements and intense competition among major players may restrain the growth of the global liver health supplements market during the forecast period.

Impact of COVID-19 on Liver Health Supplements Market:

COVID-19 is a global contagious disease that has affected almost every industry, including healthcare and pharmaceuticals. The COVID-19 outbreak has increased the demand for liver health supplements globally, primarily in North America and Asia-Pacific. As the coronavirus crises engulf the world and lead to curfews and shutdowns, it has severely affected many companies operating across the globe, which has directly affected the production and demand for these supplements. This creates many lucrative opportunities for new players and small-scale players to mark their presence in the regional market and offer low prices and high quality products to end users. Therefore, with the outbreak of COVID-19, a significant increase in the demand for these supplements has been observed globally, which has positively impacted the liver health supplements market value in 2020. and the following years.

Report scope

The report outlines the liver health supplements market study based on product, dosage, and end-user.

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On the basis of product, the liver health supplements market has been segmented into –

  • Vitamins and minerals
  • herbal supplements
  • Others

On the basis of dosage, the liver health supplements market has been segmented into –

  • capsules
  • Tablets
  • Liquid
  • Others

Depending on the distribution channel, the market for liver health supplements has been segmented into –

  • Hospital pharmacies
  • Retail pharmacies
  • Online pharmacies

Liver Health Supplements Market: Regional Outlook

Based on region, the global liver health supplements market has been segmented into five key geographical regions namely, North America, Asia-Pacific, Europe, South America, Middle East and Africa. In 2020, North America held the largest market share in the liver health supplements market, followed by Europe and Asia-Pacific, owing to the rise in beverage addiction alcohol abuse and a high prevalence of chronic liver disease in the region. On the contrary, Asia-Pacific is expected to show the highest CAGR during the forecast period, due to people’s increasing awareness of healthy products and increasing disposable income of individuals, as well as the presence growth of online retail platforms for drug supply in the region. .

Leading competitors in Liver Health Supplements Market include-

The market for liver health supplements is highly fragmented, with a large number of small players across the globe. Manufacturers of Vital Liver Health Supplements operating in the global market are-

  • Himalayan Herbal Health Care
  • Natures Craft Switzerland
  • Enzymedica
  • Thompson (Integria Healthcare)
  • Jarrow Formulas, Inc.
  • The bounty of nature
  • Irwin Natural
  • Swanson Health Products
  • NATURALife Health Products, Inc.
  • NOW Food

The Liver Health Supplements Market report provides an in-depth analysis of macroeconomic factors and market attractiveness of each segment. The report will include an in-depth qualitative and quantitative assessment of the industry/regional outlook with the presence of market players in the respective segment and region/country. The information concluded in the report includes the entries.

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Liver Health Supplements Market Report Covers Comprehensive Analysis on:

  • Market Segmentation and Regional Analysis
  • 10 year market size
  • Price analysis
  • Supply and demand analysis
  • Product life cycle analysis
  • Porter’s Five Forces and Value Chain Analysis
  • Analysis of developed and emerging economies
  • PEST analysis
  • Factor analysis of the market and forecasts
  • Opportunities, risks and market trends
  • Conclusion and recommendation
  • Regulatory landscape
  • Patent Analysis
  • Competition landscape
  • More than 15 company profiles

Regional Analysis For Liver Health Supplements Market Includes:

  • North America (United States, Canada, Mexico)
  • South America (Brazil, Argentina, Colombia, Peru, Rest of Latin America)
  • Europe (Germany, Italy, France, United Kingdom, Spain, Poland, Russia, Slovenia, Slovakia, Hungary, Czech Republic, Belgium, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Rest of Europe)
  • Asia-Pacific (China, Japan, India, South Korea, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, Vietnam, Myanmar, Cambodia, Philippines, Singapore, Australia and New Zealand, Rest of Asia-Pacific)
  • The Middle East and Africa (Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, South Africa, North Africa, Rest of MEA

Request for Report Description @ https://www.marketstatsville.com/liver-health-supplements-market

Liver Health Supplements Market: Target Audience

  • Liver Health Supplement Service Providers
  • Hospitals and diagnostic laboratories
  • Drug discovery and development research centers
  • Investors and trading experts
  • Manufacturers, Distributors and Healthcare Providers
  • Trade publications and magazines
  • Government authorities, associations and organizations

About Us:

Market Group Statsville (MSG) partners with businesses and society to address their critical risks and challenges in order to seize the enormous opportunities that lie ahead. MSG began its work in 2017, and since then the brand has evolved to become a pioneer in business consulting and market research services.

We are the leading market research and strategy builder with the depth and breadth of solutions that perfectly meet all your needs. MSG provides solutions across a wide range of industry verticals in market sizing, analytics and incisive business intelligence. MSG’s experienced research analysts are skilled at digging deep and providing a variety of customizable data that helps you make decisions with clarity, confidence, and impact.

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This Is What Liver Cancer Looks Like, Doctors Say – Eat This, Not That https://rogalevich.org/this-is-what-liver-cancer-looks-like-doctors-say-eat-this-not-that/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 14:15:23 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/this-is-what-liver-cancer-looks-like-doctors-say-eat-this-not-that/ According to the CDC, liver cancer kills 18,600 men and 9,000 women in the United States each year. Although the early stages of liver cancer usually have few symptoms, there are some warning signs of liver cancer that you should never ignore. “In its early stages, liver cancer may have no visible or felt symptoms. […]]]>

According to the CDC, liver cancer kills 18,600 men and 9,000 women in the United States each year. Although the early stages of liver cancer usually have few symptoms, there are some warning signs of liver cancer that you should never ignore. “In its early stages, liver cancer may have no visible or felt symptoms. However, as the cancer grows, people may notice one or more of these common symptoms. It is important to remember that these symptoms can also be caused by other health conditions. If you have any of these symptoms, talk to your doctor,” explains the CDC. Read on and to ensure your health and the health of others, don’t miss these Sure signs you’ve already had COVID.

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“Because the liver plays such a key role in the digestive system, cirrhosis and liver cancer can both cause you to lose your appetite and cause you to lose weight,” explains the NSW Cancer Council. “Chemotherapy, radiation and other cancer treatments can also have an impact, especially if you experience side effects such as nausea and vomiting, mouth ulcers and changes in taste and smell.”

Patient with jaundice with yellowish discoloration of the skin compared to normal skin color.
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Jaundice is yellowing of the skin and eyes resulting from excess bilirubin in the blood, due to obstruction of the bile ducts connecting the pancreas to the liver. “It’s one of the first symptoms a patient may notice,” says Jason A. Castellanos, MD, MS, a surgical oncologist at Fox Chase Cancer Center. “The bottom line is that identifying the cause of jaundice early is crucial.”

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woman in jeans jacket and pants itchy arm
Shutterstock / Josep Suria

Itchy skin – or pruritus – is often linked to jaundice and a common symptom of liver cancer. “Pruritus is a common comorbidity in chronic liver disease and kidney disease,” according to an article published in the journal Scientific reports. “These patients frequently complain of pruritus despite the absence of rash or skin signs. Patients with chronic liver disease develop systemic itching that significantly impairs activity and sleep. Often this is not not relieved by scratching the itchy areas of the skin. Patients with primary biliary cholangitis (PBC) frequently experience pruritus in chronic liver disease.”

RELATED: Here’s how to feel like you’re 20 again, doctors say

young woman with nausea in denim outfit sitting on the bed
Shutterstock / New Africa

Nausea is frequently linked to liver cancer, usually in association with other symptoms. “Symptoms of liver cancer may differ slightly, depending on the type of tumor you have,” explains Stanford Healthcare. “Please remember that other conditions can cause similar symptoms, so it’s important to see an experienced doctor for an accurate diagnosis.”

RELATED: Most People Get Belly Fat This Way, Experts Say

Young woman suffering from pain in bedroom
Shutterstock

Abdominal pain – or constant right shoulder pain – could be a symptom of liver cancer. “You should never ignore liver pain,” warns Carolina Digestive Health Associates. “It’s not something that has a benign cause, like stomach cramps when you have the stomach flu or a headache when you have a cold. If you have distinct pain in the liver area, you should see a doctor immediately.”

RELATED: Dr. Fauci just gave this essential virus update

Portrait of confident doctor in private clinic
iStock

If you have any or all of these symptoms, talk to your healthcare provider as soon as possible to rule out any potential problems. Also, in general, the CDC says:

  • “Drink alcohol in moderation, if at all. If you choose to drink alcohol, limit the amount you drink. For women, that means no more than one drink a day. For men, that means no more than two drinks a day.
  • Maintain a healthy weight. If your current weight is healthy, try to maintain it by choosing a healthy diet and exercising most days of the week. If you need to lose weight, reduce the number of calories you eat each day and increase the amount of exercise you do. Try to lose weight slowly – 1 or 2 pounds (0.5 to 1 kilogram) every week.”
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Acute porphyria linked to higher risk of primary liver cancer, study finds https://rogalevich.org/acute-porphyria-linked-to-higher-risk-of-primary-liver-cancer-study-finds/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 22:27:53 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/acute-porphyria-linked-to-higher-risk-of-primary-liver-cancer-study-finds/ Patients with acute porphyria have a higher risk of developing primary liver cancer, according to a Swedish study. The researchers observed that primary liver cancer was 38 times more likely to occur in patients with acute porphyria than in the general population. This risk was even higher for people with active disease who were over […]]]>

Patients with acute porphyria have a higher risk of developing primary liver cancer, according to a Swedish study.

The researchers observed that primary liver cancer was 38 times more likely to occur in patients with acute porphyria than in the general population. This risk was even higher for people with active disease who were over the age of 50 or who had been admitted to hospital for treatment.

According to the researchers, patients who are at an increased risk of developing liver cancer should be monitored closely and regularly, including having ultrasounds from the age of 50.

The study, “Risk of primary liver cancer in patients with acute hepatic porphyria: a matched cohort study of 1244 individualswas published in the Journal of Internal Medicine.

Symptoms of acute porphyria come on suddenly and can last for several hours to several days. They result from a deficiency in one of the many enzymes involved in the production of heme, a molecule necessary for the transport of oxygen in red blood cells.

When this enzyme is absent and not functioning well, the molecules from which heme is formed – called heme precursors – accumulate in the liver and other tissues and may appear in excess in the blood and be eliminated in urine or stool.

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Acute porphyria is linked to an increased risk of primary liver cancer. However, “risk estimates are unclear,” the researchers wrote, as are the specific types of porphyria and other factors that put patients at greatest risk.

To investigate this further, the researchers looked at data from 1,244 patients registered in the Swedish Porphyria Registry, a database that includes all patients who are diagnosed with porphyria in Sweden, from 1987 to 2015. The researchers also included 12,333 patients of different age and sex. -matched individuals from the general study population who served as controls.

There were 1063 (85%) patients with acute intermittent porphyria, the most common type of acute porphyria. Of the remaining patients, 125 (10%) had variegate porphyria and 56 (5%) had hereditary coproporphyria. The patients had a median age of 36 years at inclusion and 654 (53%) were women.

During the study period, 266 (21%) patients were admitted to hospital with porphyria. Elevated urinary levels of porphobilinogen (PBG) – a precursor to heme – were found in 494 (46%) patients with acute intermittent porphyria.

At a median follow-up of 19.5 years, there were a total of 108 new cases of primary liver cancer. The most common type of primary liver cancer was hepatocellular carcinomafollowed by cholangiocarcinoma.

These cases accounted for 6.7% (83 of 1,244) of patients with acute porphyria and 0.2% (25 of 12,333) in the general population. This means that patients with acute porphyria were 38 times more likely to develop primary liver cancer than individuals in the general population.

Next, the researchers looked for factors that could put patients at an increased risk of developing cancer. They found that hospitalized patients had a 90% higher risk of developing primary liver cancer than those who had never been hospitalized with porphyria.

Another risk factor for primary liver cancer was a high level of PBG in the urine. While none of the patients who tested negative for PBG developed primary liver cancer, those with high PBG had a risk of developing cancer that was 61 times higher than the general population. In addition, the higher the PBG level, the higher the risk of developing primary liver cancer.

The median age at diagnosis of primary liver cancer was 71 years in patients with acute porphyria and 74 years in individuals in the general population.

None of the patients developed primary liver cancer before the age of 50. Among 175 patients with acute porphyria over the age of 50 who had elevated levels of PBG in urine and/or had been hospitalized with porphyria, the incidence rate of new cases of primary cancer of the liver amounted to 1.7% per year.

“Patients clinically identified with [acute porphyria] …should be advised to undergo biannual ultrasound monitoring from the age of 50,” the researchers concluded.

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Positive results in the early detection of liver cancer https://rogalevich.org/positive-results-in-the-early-detection-of-liver-cancer/ Tue, 08 Mar 2022 02:21:21 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/positive-results-in-the-early-detection-of-liver-cancer/ Helio Health, an AI-driven healthcare company focused on commercializing tests for early detection of cancer from a simple blood draw, today announced that Hepatology Communications has released positive results from the ENCORE study validating the strong clinical performance of HelioLiver in detecting the presence of early hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common form of liver […]]]>

Helio Health, an AI-driven healthcare company focused on commercializing tests for early detection of cancer from a simple blood draw, today announced that Hepatology Communications has released positive results from the ENCORE study validating the strong clinical performance of HelioLiver in detecting the presence of early hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common form of liver cancer and the seventh most common cancer in the world, but the second in terms of cancer-related mortality, often due to late diagnosis.1 In this prospective, multicenter, blinded phase 2 study, HelioLiver demonstrated high specificity %) and high sensitivity (76%) in detecting the Early-stage HCC (stage I and II), significantly outperforming other clinically available detection tools such as AFP (57%), GALAD (65%) and ultrasound (47%). 2,3 Considering HCC as a whole, HelioLiver performed at 85% sensitivity with the same specificity of 91%.2

Diagnostic tests for HCC Early Stage Susceptibility (I + II) Overall Sensitivity
HelioLiver2 76% 85%
PFA (≥ 20 ng/mL)2 57% 62%
GALAD score (≥ -0.63)2 65% 75%
Ultrasound3 47% 84%
Note: Table shows HelioLiver sensitivities at 91% specificity2
2 Lin N, et al. 2021.
3 Tzartzeva K, et al. 2018.

Helio has developed its next-generation sequencing platform, ECLIPSETM, to identify 77 methylation targets across 28 genes. These DNA markers work in combination with serum HCC proteins AFP, AFP-L3% and DCP to enhance the multi-analyte algorithm.

• The area under receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) for HelioLiver was 0.944, demonstrating significantly better predictive ability than the other tests.

• At a fixed specificity of 87.5%, HelioLiver achieved 87% sensitivity for early stage HCC and 90% overall sensitivity.

• 10 of the 28 genes used in the HelioLiver assay were found to be directly involved in molecular pathways known to be involved in the pathogenesis of HCC while only one of the 497 genes studied but not selected met the same criteria, suggesting that the markers in HelioLiver are more biologically relevant than tests that use these other genes.

Hepatology Communications is the official open access, peer-reviewed journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD), dedicated to the rapid dissemination of high-quality research in hepatology. AASLD is the most respected medical guidelines organization for liver disease in the United States.

HelioLiver is being further evaluated in Helio’s prospective pivotal biomarker study, CLiMB (NCT03694600), where test performance will be directly compared to ultrasound using multiphasic MRI as the standard of care for the diagnosis of HCC.

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World leaders celebrate liver disease successes and prepare for challenges ahead https://rogalevich.org/world-leaders-celebrate-liver-disease-successes-and-prepare-for-challenges-ahead/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 20:14:45 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/world-leaders-celebrate-liver-disease-successes-and-prepare-for-challenges-ahead/ Yale’s liver program began with a biopsy in October 1947, one of the first liver biopsies ever performed. Gerald Klatskin, MD, founded the Liver Study Unit and developed the techniques that allowed him to perform the biopsy, even designing the biopsy needle. Klatskin, who was David Paige Smith Professor at the Yale School of Medicine […]]]>

Yale’s liver program began with a biopsy in October 1947, one of the first liver biopsies ever performed. Gerald Klatskin, MD, founded the Liver Study Unit and developed the techniques that allowed him to perform the biopsy, even designing the biopsy needle. Klatskin, who was David Paige Smith Professor at the Yale School of Medicine (YSM), was also an amateur photographer. During his career, he assembled about 50,000 Kodachromes from 10,000 liver biopsies, said James L. Boyer, MD, FACEP, who trained with Klatskin in 1969.

Boyer, an associate professor of medicine (digestive diseases) and director emeritus of the Yale Liver Center, recalled how Klatskin recorded his data with a McBee Card Co punch card system. were when they were taken,” Boyer said at a talk celebrating Yale’s liver program.

The Yale Diamond Jubilee, Celebrating 75 years of Academic Hepatology at Yale, was held on February 25. The virtual meeting attracted an international roster of presenters and audience members, many of whom were former or current members of the Liver Program. Nearly 350 people registered for the one-day event. Presenters discussed the program’s global impact, its many successes in diagnosing and treating liver disease, while preparing for the challenges ahead.

The day began with welcoming remarks from Michael H. Nathanson, MD, PhD, Gladys Phillips Crofoot Professor of Medicine (Digestive Diseases) and Professor of Cell Biology, and Director of the Yale Liver Center. The keynote address was delivered by Dean Nancy J. Brown, MD.

The Liver Center is one of only three research centers in the country that focuses entirely on the liver and is sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIH/NIDDK). Now in his 36’sand year of funding, the center has 86 members from 24 YSM departments and sections. Of those, 75% have joint posts with other center members, Nathanson said. The three thematic areas of the center are immunology/inflammation, hepatic metabolism and epithelial biology.

Nathanson pointed to the growing need for liver care in Connecticut. In the past year, one in seven people discharged from Yale New Haven Hospital had a primary or secondary liver diagnosis; The Yale Liver Tumor Committee discussed 619 patients; 2,170 liver-related interventional radiology procedures were performed; and 1,024 liver biopsies were reviewed. Yale has 65 outpatient liver clinics each week, including fatty liver clinics; liver cancer; Gaucher disease and other inherited liver diseases; viral hepatitis; liver transplant; alcohol and addiction in liver disease; and undiagnosed liver disease.

Today, the Yale Liver Center is more diverse than ever, Nathanson said. Of the clinical hepatology faculty members, half are women and more than 20% belong to underrepresented minorities.

One of its pioneering wives, Guadalupe Garcia-Tsao, MD, FRCP, Professor of Medicine (Digestive Diseases) and Chief of Digestive Diseases at VA-CT Hospital in West Haven, discussed groundbreaking hypertension research portal that she conducted with her mentor, Roberto Groszmann, MD. Garcia-Tsao also reported on the VA Hospital’s clinical practice of evaluating all veterans for hepatitis C (HCV) risk factors. The West Haven VA was one of four National Hepatitis C Resource Centers that created and implemented performance measures and initiatives to ensure patients with HCV were diagnosed and treated, a- she declared. Currently, about 90% of veterans with HCV have been treated and cured, she said.

The clinical practice also includes a tele-hepatology clinic that allows West Haven hepatologists to speak to veterans at clinics in central and western Massachusetts. “We can save patients a lot of time that it would take them to travel to us,” she said.

A tumor tracking system, based on radiology reports, was first implemented in West Haven VA, and has been expanded to include many other sites. The system was created by Tamar Taddei, MD, who will succeed Garcia-Tsao as VA Liver Chief beginning in July 2022.

In his presentation, Mario Strazzabosco, MD, PhD, professor of medicine and co-director of the Yale Liver Center, discussed future challenges in the diagnosis and treatment of liver disease. “Despite the tremendous therapeutic advances generated by academic hepatology, liver disease remains a growing global and national healthcare challenge, and the second leading cause of lost working life years,” Strazzabosco said. He urged the medical community to focus on prevention, screening, early diagnosis and therapy. “Clinical guidance in patients with liver disease is always oriented towards advanced disease and its complications, whereas the early and reversible stages of disease are often ignored and overlooked,” he explained. Liver disease results from potentially preventable epidemics of viral hepatitis, alcohol consumption, obesity, diabetes, and inequalities in underserved populations, including lack of health insurance that does not allow for a proper prevention.

Addressing the stigma often associated with liver disease should also be a priority, he added. Fear of being stigmatized causes people to delay or avoid seeing a doctor, and can lead to an increase in unhealthy behaviors as well as social isolation. As a result, more people will have serious liver disease in the future, he said.

As an introduction to subsequent sessions, Strazzabosco showed that liver research at Yale transcends the boundaries of specialties, sections, and departments. He reminded the audience that although improvements in medicine have thus far been driven by specialization, this will not hold in a future where hepatology must adopt models of care geared towards centered liver care. on the patient beyond traditional medical boundaries. The Liver Center can facilitate this transition by ensuring that clinical practice and research remain close, because there is research in health care and health care in research, he said.

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World leaders celebrate liver disease successes and prepare for challenges ahead https://rogalevich.org/world-leaders-celebrate-liver-disease-successes-and-prepare-for-challenges-ahead-2/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 18:55:09 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/world-leaders-celebrate-liver-disease-successes-and-prepare-for-challenges-ahead-2/ Yale’s liver program began with a biopsy in October 1947, one of the first liver biopsies ever performed. Gerald Klatskin, MD, founded the Liver Study Unit and developed the techniques that allowed him to perform the biopsy, even designing the biopsy needle. Klatskin, who was David Paige Smith Professor at the Yale School of Medicine […]]]>

Yale’s liver program began with a biopsy in October 1947, one of the first liver biopsies ever performed. Gerald Klatskin, MD, founded the Liver Study Unit and developed the techniques that allowed him to perform the biopsy, even designing the biopsy needle. Klatskin, who was David Paige Smith Professor at the Yale School of Medicine (YSM), was also an amateur photographer. During his career, he assembled about 50,000 Kodachromes from 10,000 liver biopsies, said James L. Boyer, MD, FACEP, who trained with Klatskin in 1969.

Boyer, an associate professor of medicine (digestive diseases) and director emeritus of the Yale Liver Center, recalled how Klatskin recorded his data with a McBee Card Co punch card system. were when they were taken,” Boyer said at a talk celebrating Yale’s liver program.

The Yale Diamond Jubilee, Celebrating 75 years of Academic Hepatology at Yale, was held on February 25. The virtual meeting attracted an international roster of presenters and audience members, many of whom were former or current members of the Liver Program. Nearly 350 people registered for the one-day event. Presenters discussed the program’s global impact, its many successes in diagnosing and treating liver disease, while preparing for the challenges ahead.

The day began with welcoming remarks from Michael H. Nathanson, MD, PhD, Gladys Phillips Crofoot Professor of Medicine (Digestive Diseases) and Professor of Cell Biology, and Director of the Yale Liver Center. The keynote address was delivered by Dean Nancy J. Brown, MD.

The Liver Center is one of only three research centers in the country that focuses entirely on the liver and is sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIH/NIDDK). Now in his 36’sand year of funding, the center has 86 members from 24 YSM departments and sections. Of those, 75% have joint posts with other center members, Nathanson said. The three thematic areas of the center are immunology/inflammation, hepatic metabolism and epithelial biology.

Nathanson pointed to the growing need for liver care in Connecticut. In the past year, one in seven people discharged from Yale New Haven Hospital had a primary or secondary liver diagnosis; The Yale Liver Tumor Committee discussed 619 patients; 2,170 liver-related interventional radiology procedures were performed; and 1,024 liver biopsies were reviewed. Yale has 65 outpatient liver clinics each week, including fatty liver clinics; liver cancer; Gaucher disease and other inherited liver diseases; viral hepatitis; liver transplant; alcohol and addiction in liver disease; and undiagnosed liver disease.

Today, the Yale Liver Center is more diverse than ever, Nathanson said. Of the clinical hepatology faculty members, half are women and more than 20% belong to underrepresented minorities.

One of its pioneering wives, Guadalupe Garcia-Tsao, MD, FRCP, Professor of Medicine (Digestive Diseases) and Chief of Digestive Diseases at VA-CT Hospital in West Haven, discussed groundbreaking hypertension research portal that she conducted with her mentor, Roberto Groszmann, MD. Garcia-Tsao also reported on the VA Hospital’s clinical practice of evaluating all veterans for hepatitis C (HCV) risk factors. The West Haven VA was one of four National Hepatitis C Resource Centers that created and implemented performance measures and initiatives to ensure patients with HCV were diagnosed and treated, a- she declared. Currently, about 90% of veterans with HCV have been treated and cured, she said.

The clinical practice also includes a tele-hepatology clinic that allows West Haven hepatologists to speak to veterans at clinics in central and western Massachusetts. “We can save patients a lot of time that it would take them to travel to us,” she said.

A tumor tracking system, based on radiology reports, was first implemented in West Haven VA, and has been expanded to include many other sites. The system was created by Tamar Taddei, MD, who will succeed Garcia-Tsao as VA Liver Chief beginning in July 2022.

In his presentation, Mario Strazzabosco, MD, PhD, professor of medicine and co-director of the Yale Liver Center, discussed future challenges in the diagnosis and treatment of liver disease. “Despite the tremendous therapeutic advances generated by academic hepatology, liver disease remains a growing global and national healthcare challenge, and the second leading cause of lost working life years,” Strazzabosco said. He urged the medical community to focus on prevention, screening, early diagnosis and therapy. “Clinical guidance in patients with liver disease is always oriented towards advanced disease and its complications, whereas the early and reversible stages of disease are often ignored and overlooked,” he explained. Liver disease results from potentially preventable epidemics of viral hepatitis, alcohol consumption, obesity, diabetes, and inequalities in underserved populations, including lack of health insurance that does not allow for a proper prevention.

Addressing the stigma often associated with liver disease should also be a priority, he added. Fear of being stigmatized causes people to delay or avoid seeing a doctor, and can lead to an increase in unhealthy behaviors as well as social isolation. As a result, more people will have serious liver disease in the future, he said.

As an introduction to subsequent sessions, Strazzabosco showed that liver research at Yale transcends the boundaries of specialties, sections, and departments. He reminded the audience that although improvements in medicine have thus far been driven by specialization, this will not hold in a future where hepatology must adopt models of care geared towards centered liver care. on the patient beyond traditional medical boundaries. The Liver Center can facilitate this transition by ensuring that clinical practice and research remain close, because there is research in health care and health care in research, he said.

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Supporting the 3rd leading cause of cancer-related death https://rogalevich.org/supporting-the-3rd-leading-cause-of-cancer-related-death/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 15:18:52 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/supporting-the-3rd-leading-cause-of-cancer-related-death/ Liver cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, and the incidence of primary liver cancer in the United States has tripled over the past four decades. While chronic viral hepatitis is the primary route to liver cancer in the United States, non-infectious causes such as morbid obesity, type 2 diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty […]]]>

Liver cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, and the incidence of primary liver cancer in the United States has tripled over the past four decades. While chronic viral hepatitis is the primary route to liver cancer in the United States, non-infectious causes such as morbid obesity, type 2 diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and non-infectious steatohepatitis associated alcoholism (NASH) increased rapidly. We will describe each of these pathways, starting with viral hepatitis (HCV and HBV) and alcoholic cirrhosis.


There is a morbid saying that cancer eventually affects us all, unless something else affects us first.

While some cancers currently have no accessible prevention, some can be effectively prevented. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of those that can be prevented, but once HCC is established and symptomatic, survival rates drop sharply. While liver cancer is the 8and location of cancer site by prevalence (Figure 1), this is the 3rd leading cause of death (Figure 2). HCC has a high mortality profile with a median survival after diagnosis of 6-20 months, and in the United States it has a 5-year survival rate of only 10% (Golabi, et al., 2017)

Figure 1. Top 10 cancer sites by case (Sung et al, 2021)

Top 10 cancer sites by death

Figure 2. Top 10 cancer sites by death (Sung et al, 2021)

The COVID-19 pandemic has rightly occupied the minds and efforts of nearly everyone in healthcare for the past two years, but HCC has not gone away and continues to cause daily damage. . HCC was on 4and leading cause of cancer-related death in 2019 (Yang et al., 2019), and has been steadily increasing – it has tripled in the United States (Rawla, Sunkara, Muralidharan & Raj, 2018).

Although your daily chance of encountering a patient with HCC is still small, it increases year by year and there is a serious risk of missing the window of opportunity to prevent full-blown HCC.

This blog will describe how to be alert to the causes and cases of HCC, and we will provide you with tools and resources to help you identify HCC, ways to connect your patient with appropriate specialists, and help you find appropriate studies and trials for your patient.

There are four main HCC risk factors:

  1. Hepatitis B (HBV)
  2. Hepatitis C (HCV)
  3. Excessive consumption of alcohol
  4. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) resulting in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH)

How likely are you to encounter hepatocellular carcinoma in patients?

In the near future, it is unlikely that any specific patient you see will already have HCC. That’s great, but it’s also a problem because you’re less likely to recognize it immediately. For HCC, delay is the killer.

However, you are very likely to see a patient who, regardless of their primary complaint, is already on one or more of the four main HCC pathways. The picture is also skewed when race is taken into account – while the overall rate of HBV infection has declined significantly since 1991, it remains a concern for the African American population. In 2017, non-Hispanic African Americans were 1.5 times more likely to die from viral hepatitis than whites, and almost twice as likely to die from HCV. (HHS-OMH”Hepatitis and African Americans”)

Anything you can do to increase HBV vaccination rates and prevent HCV infection will help steer your patients away from the viral pathway. It is therefore important to use screening tests for HBV and HCV and to strongly encourage HBV vaccination even if patients are not in high-risk categories. Likewise, addressing alcohol use and encouraging your patients to follow guidelines will help steer them away from alcohol’s path to HCC.

the NAFLD/NASH pathway talks about lifestyle changes that are inherently healthier and worth discussing. Discussing healthy eating, limiting portion sizes, and maintaining a healthy weight with your patients can help steer them away from this path.

Patient history that should raise your index of suspicion includes past unprotected sex, use of needles, binge drinking or binge drinking, or increasing obesity. However, it is important to keep in mind that many patients who had no obvious risk factors in their history nevertheless went on to have HCC. Although atypical, HCC can be the result of maternal HBV infection or HCV transmitted to children. For an example, see “Better off bald: a life in 147 days

How to discuss staging with patients

Discussing staging with patients can be difficult, and the literature is often either aimed at clinicians or contains misleading information. Blue Faery provides clinically accurate yet understandable materials to help you describe the staging and help the patient understand where they are on the spectrum.

These materials include:

  • The HCC patient education brochures is written in plain language and intended to be read by the patient.
  • The Blue Faery and Exelixis staging discussion pad contains anatomical graphics and easy-to-understand text. Each double-sided sheet allows the doctor to add notes that his patient can use after the appointment.
  • the Liver Cancer Patient Resource Guide is a 20-page booklet containing relevant explanations and resources for HCC patients and their caregivers.

Blue Faery will send these documents free of charge to any doctor who requests them.

How to Find Hepatocellular Carcinoma Specialists, Treatment Options and Clinical Trials

Treatment of HCC is best approached with a multidisciplinary team coordinated by a primary care physician. The most effective approach will likely require the expertise of multiple healthcare professionals, including the primary care physician, and may include an oncologist with experience in HCC, gastroenterologist, hepatologist, radiologist interventionist, a radiation oncologist, a surgical oncologist and a transplant surgeon.

Where to find clinical trials specific to hepatocellular carcinoma

To find all clinical trials, the best option is clinicaltrials.gov, but this website can be confusing and difficult to navigate. To help physicians guide their patients to relevant trials, Blue Faery has a custom HCC clinical trial browser.

Where can patients find community support?

Patient communities are very helpful in providing patients with practical guidance for their care journey and are often a source of emotional support from people who understand the experience.

the Blue Fairy Liver Cancer Community is a free, HIPAA-compliant online community where patients and caregivers are invited to join and seek or exchange relevant information about HCC care. Members ask questions, discuss concerns and find common ground along their cancer journey. Forum moderators include Community Ambassadors who were former caregivers of HCC patients.

For individual patient support, Blue Faery has partnered with Imerman Angels, a non-profit organization that provides peer-to-peer support services to the liver cancer community. Blue Faery and Imerman Angels believe that no one should face cancer alone.

Conclusion

With proper screening, testing and inoculation, the viral pathway to HCC can often be interrupted. Blue Faery provides free, patient-readable and clinically accurate materials to help physicians discuss their patients’ staging, options and resources.

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