liver damage – Rogalevich http://rogalevich.org/ Sat, 26 Mar 2022 12:36:29 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://rogalevich.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.png liver damage – Rogalevich http://rogalevich.org/ 32 32 High Fructose Intake May Trigger Fatty Liver Disease https://rogalevich.org/high-fructose-intake-may-trigger-fatty-liver-disease/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 18:40:15 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/high-fructose-intake-may-trigger-fatty-liver-disease/ Adding high fructose beverages to a diet that already includes a high fat content may accelerate the risk of foie gras disease, according to scientists from the University of Barcelona. What there is to know: High Fructose Intake May Increase Risk of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Diseasein which too much fat is stored in liver cells. […]]]>

Adding high fructose beverages to a diet that already includes a high fat content may accelerate the risk of foie gras disease, according to scientists from the University of Barcelona.

What there is to know:

  • High Fructose Intake May Increase Risk of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Diseasein which too much fat is stored in liver cells.

  • High fructose corn syrup is one of the most common sweeteners in the food industry and is used for sweeten many products despite scientific evidence that it is associated with metabolic disorders that are risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

  • The researchers found that consumption a diet high in fructose for long periods of time may result in deterioration of the layer of cells that creates the intestinal barrier that prevents bacteria and toxins from entering the bloodstream and affecting the liver.

  • Fatty liver disease can lead to liver inflammation and liver damage, resulting in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, one more aggressive disease which in turn can evolve into scarring of the liver (cirrhosis), liver cancerand liver failure.

  • Severe fatty liver disease and liver tumors deterioration of the intestinal barrier created by excessive consumption of fructose can be avoided with medications.

This is a summary of the article, “A New Study Relates Liquid Fructose Intake to Fatty Liver Disease“, published in Molecular Nutrition and Food Research on March 4, 2022. The full article can be found at newswise.com.

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Ayurvedic drug backed by AYUSH ministry causes liver damage, study finds https://rogalevich.org/ayurvedic-drug-backed-by-ayush-ministry-causes-liver-damage-study-finds/ Sun, 06 Mar 2022 15:51:58 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/ayurvedic-drug-backed-by-ayush-ministry-causes-liver-damage-study-finds/ The BJP-led central government’s blanket promotion of all things herbal does not seem like a good idea, as medical groups have reported severe liver damage in some people triggered by an Ayurvedic herb called Giloy, whose consumption has been promoted as an immune stimulant to prevent and treat Covid-19. In a multicenter study, physicians from […]]]>

The BJP-led central government’s blanket promotion of all things herbal does not seem like a good idea, as medical groups have reported severe liver damage in some people triggered by an Ayurvedic herb called Giloy, whose consumption has been promoted as an immune stimulant to prevent and treat Covid-19.

In a multicenter study, physicians from 12 cities reported Giloy (Guduchi in Sanskrit)-induced liver toxicity in at least 43 patients. This is the second study with a similar conclusion in the past nine months after another group of Mumbai doctors reported Giloy-induced liver injury in six patients.

The Union Ministry of Ayurveda, Unani, Siddha and Homeopathy (AYUSH), which has fought for the herb and issued three press releases in the past nine months claiming that Giloy is safe, admitted that an overdose of Giloy could be dangerous, without explaining how much of the herb would be considered safe.

Read also | Giloy safe; misleading to link it to liver damage: Center

“At present, we know that Giloy causes autoimmune-type liver injury, and liver injury is not dose-dependent. This is idiosyncratic liver injury, which is a type of liver injury which can occur with any dose and any duration of use and not just an overdose,” said Cyriac Abby Phillips, liver specialist at Rajagiri Hospital in Aluva, who led the multicentre study.

“This is very dangerous because people with silent autoimmune disorders or those with confirmed autoimmune diseases (such as hypothyroidism, diabetes, lupus and rheumatoid arthritis) should be warned against taking of Giloy because it can potentially activate and modulate the immune system for the worse and can cause flare-ups of immune-mediated organ damage, especially in the liver,” he said. DH.

DH contacted AYUSH Secretary Vaidya Rajesh Kotecha to ask for his comments on what might be the appropriate dose for Giloy but has yet to receive a response even after two weeks.

However, in a press release issued on February 16, 2022, the ministry said, “Giloy is an herb popularly known for its immense therapeutic applications in traditional medicine systems and has been used in the management of Covid-19. Considering the overall health benefits, the herb cannot be considered poisonous.

“Giloy or Guduchi has been used in Ayurveda for a long time. Its effectiveness in the management of various disorders is no longer to be demonstrated. To associate Giloy with liver damage would be misleading and disastrous for the Indian traditional medicine system,” the AYUSH Ministry said in another press release on July 7, 2021.

The two statements were released after the publication of the two studies describing the herb’s adverse effects and advising people to proceed with caution when using herbal remedies.

“All medicines, ‘traditional’ or otherwise, must undergo the same levels of formal testing for their safety (and to actually have useful effects!). The various ‘passes’ granted by regulatory systems to many ‘Non-traditional’ drugs in these respects are incorrect,” commented immunologist Satyajit Rath, who is not involved in either study.

“Since Guduchi is represented as (and sold as) something that ‘enhances immunity’, I have to point out that the idea of ​​a general immunostimulant ‘drug’ is extremely problematic, so much so that it’s almost a relief that most, if not all, of such ‘immunity boosters’ sold on the market actually ‘do’ nothing great for the immune system,” said Rath, who retired from the National Institute of Delhi immunology.

Check out the latest DH videos here

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Long or irregular periods can put a woman’s liver at risk – Consumer Health News https://rogalevich.org/long-or-irregular-periods-can-put-a-womans-liver-at-risk-consumer-health-news/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 12:44:36 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/long-or-irregular-periods-can-put-a-womans-liver-at-risk-consumer-health-news/ FRIDAY, March 4, 2022 (HealthDay News) — According to a new study, women with long or irregular periods are at an increased risk of contracting a serious condition called non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic disease in which excess fat builds up in the liver. It affects about 24% […]]]>

FRIDAY, March 4, 2022 (HealthDay News) — According to a new study, women with long or irregular periods are at an increased risk of contracting a serious condition called non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic disease in which excess fat builds up in the liver. It affects about 24% of American adults, according to the March 3 report in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism.

“The results of our study show that long or irregular menstrual cycles may be associated with an increased risk of developing NAFLD, and this link was not explained by obesity,” said Dr. Seungho Ryu of the Kangbuk Samsung Hospital at Sungkyunkwan University Medical School in Seoul, South Korea.

“Previous studies have shown that long or irregular menstrual cycles are associated with type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, but our study is the first to find a link between long or irregular menstrual cycles and NAFLD,” Ryu noted. in a press release.

NAFLD that is not caused by heavy alcohol consumption may progress to chronic liver damage and is associated with a higher risk of death. There are no approved drugs to treat the condition, so diet and exercise are the standard of care.

For the study, the researchers analyzed data from more than 72,000 women under the age of 40. About 28% of women had long or irregular menstrual cycles and 7% had NAFLD.

After four years of follow-up, new cases of NAFLD had been diagnosed in nearly 9% of women. The researchers concluded that there was an association between long or irregular menstrual cycles in young premenopausal women and an increased risk of NAFLD.

“Young women with long or irregular menstrual cycles may benefit from lifestyle changes to reduce the risk of NAFLD as well as other cardiometabolic diseases,” Ryu concluded.

More information

There’s more on NAFLD at the US National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.

THE SOURCE: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolismpress release, March 3, 2022

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Fatty liver disease: four signs of the disease explained https://rogalevich.org/fatty-liver-disease-four-signs-of-the-disease-explained/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 15:08:11 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/fatty-liver-disease-four-signs-of-the-disease-explained/ Warning signs that suggest you are at risk of developing fatty liver disease. Accumulation of fat in the liver can cause non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a condition seen in overweight or obese people. NAFLD is not caused by alcohol, but if left untreated, it can lead to cirrhosis resembling liver damage caused by excessive […]]]>

Warning signs that suggest you are at risk of developing fatty liver disease.

Accumulation of fat in the liver can cause non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a condition seen in overweight or obese people.

NAFLD is not caused by alcohol, but if left untreated, it can lead to cirrhosis resembling liver damage caused by excessive alcohol consumption.

However, foods and drinks containing alcohol or sugar can make the situation worse, so it is advisable to limit their consumption.

NAFLD is the most common liver disease in the world.

More than 90% of obese people, 60% of diabetics and 20% of people with a healthy weight suffer from this disease.

The human liver normally contains some fat, but when fat exceeds 5% of liver weight, fatty liver can develop.

In the early stages, NAFLD usually has no symptoms, but it can be detected by a liver function test from the blood sample.

The warning signs appear when it progresses to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) or fibrosis in which the liver has become inflamed.

A person with NASH may experience:

  1. extremely tired,
  2. tiredness,
  3. pain in the upper right of the belly on the lower right side of the ribs,
  4. and lose weight for no reason.

Prolonged fibrosis and persistent inflammation will cause cirrhosis where the liver is severely scarred and damaged.

Permanent damage can lead to liver cancer, liver failure, and ultimately death.

Symptoms of cirrhosis can include:

  • itchy skin,
  • edema (swelling of the legs or stomach),
  • and jaundice (the skin and the whites of the eyes turn yellow).

We don’t know how mild fatty liver disease develops into serious disease such as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and liver fibrosis.

To understand the process, the researchers performed a genetic analysis of hepatocytes, the main functional cells of the liver.

Professor Stephan Herzig, co-author of the study, said:

“Understanding the mechanism by which this condition becomes fatal is essential in our quest to find therapeutic solutions and preventive measures.”

The research team developed a method targeting particular nodes of the protein network to halt disease progression or even prevent fibrosis.

A network of proteins called “transcription factors” is involved in the process of hepatocyte reprogramming.

Failure of the process could lead to dysfunction of hepatocyte cells.

For example, during the development of NASH, hepatocyte cells lose their identity.

Dr Ana Alfaro, the first author of the study, said:

“These findings are important because they unravel the cellular mechanisms underlying non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.

Knowing the role of protein networks and the loss of hepatocyte identity gives us potential intervention targets for the development of effective therapies.

The study was published in the journal Cell metabolism (Loft et al., 2021).

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7 Foods That Support Liver Health https://rogalevich.org/7-foods-that-support-liver-health/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 09:42:27 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/7-foods-that-support-liver-health/ The liver produces proteins, carbohydrates, and bile, so it is known as the powerhouse of the body. It performs a number of activities such as storing vitamins, minerals and carbohydrates, as well as breaking down toxins such as alcohol, drugs and natural by-products of metabolism. Keeping the liver in good shape is extremely important for […]]]>

The liver produces proteins, carbohydrates, and bile, so it is known as the powerhouse of the body. It performs a number of activities such as storing vitamins, minerals and carbohydrates, as well as breaking down toxins such as alcohol, drugs and natural by-products of metabolism. Keeping the liver in good shape is extremely important for the maintenance of health, and a balanced diet is the basis of this. Here are some foods you should include in your diet to keep the liver functioning properly.

1. Tea

A cup of tea can help boost liver health because it’s loaded with antioxidants. Black and green tea can improve levels of enzymes and fats in the liver, and regular consumption can help maintain liver health. Green tea also reduces oxidative stress and reduces liver fat.

2. Coffee

Coffee is linked to a reduced risk of liver disease. Studies have shown that drinking coffee reduces the risk of cirrhosis, also known as permanent liver damage.

3. Oats

Oats make a great healthy breakfast. Well, not many people know that oats are good for the liver because they are high in fiber. Being rich in antioxidants, oats speed up healthy liver recovery and also slow down the death of damaged liver cells. Fiber-rich foods like grains and beans are also good for the liver.

4. Fruit

Eating fruit is an important part of a balanced diet. Among the many health benefits of eating fruits, one is that they keep your liver healthy. Citrus fruits like oranges and grapefruits can help prevent fat buildup in the liver due to the presence of vitamin C.

5. Vegetables

Vegetables boost your immune system. Cruciferous vegetables help prevent chronic disease, improve mental health, and are equally good for liver health. These vegetables are broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, spinach and others. These cruciferous vegetables may also help prevent and fight non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

6. Tofu

Tofu is very beneficial for your liver because it is made from soy and can additionally help reduce fat buildup in the liver. Being a healthy alternative to protein, soy and tofu are beneficial for liver health. Some soy foods include edamame, tempeh, miso, bean sprouts, soy nuts; some dairy-free yogurts.

7. Nuts

Nuts are a healthy source of fat because they can reduce inflammation. Walnuts can also help keep your liver healthy, as they are rich in vitamin E and plant compounds, walnuts may reduce the risk of alcoholic liver disease. Include a handful of nuts in your daily diet for best results.

Read all the latest Assembly news, breaking news and live updates here.

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Women with irregular periods may be at risk for liver disease https://rogalevich.org/women-with-irregular-periods-may-be-at-risk-for-liver-disease/ Tue, 01 Mar 2022 14:00:00 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/women-with-irregular-periods-may-be-at-risk-for-liver-disease/ News – WASHINGTON –Women with long or irregular periods are known to have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes and heart disease, but researchers have found that these women may also be at risk for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), according to a study. new study published in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical […]]]>

News – WASHINGTON –Women with long or irregular periods are known to have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes and heart disease, but researchers have found that these women may also be at risk for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), according to a study. new study published in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism.

About 24% of American adults have NAFLD, a chronic disease in which excess fat builds up in the liver. This fat accumulation is not caused by heavy alcohol consumption. NAFLD can progress to chronic liver damage and is associated with a higher risk of death. Diet and exercise are the standard of care for NAFLD because no drugs have been approved to treat the disease.

“The results of our study show that long or irregular menstrual cycles may be associated with an increased risk of developing NAFLD, and this link was not explained by obesity,” said Seungho Ryu, MD, Ph. D., from the Center for Cohort Studies, Total Healthcare Center, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine in Seoul, South Korea. “Previous studies have shown that long or irregular menstrual cycles are associated with type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, but our study is the first to find a link between long or irregular menstrual cycles and NAFLD.”

The researchers studied a dataset of 72,092 women under the age of 40. About 28% of these women had long or irregular menstrual cycles and 7% had NAFLD. Researchers followed up four years later and found that new cases of NAFLD occurred in nearly 9% of women. The researchers concluded that there was an association between long or irregular menstrual cycles in young premenopausal women and an increased risk of NAFLD.

“Young women with long or irregular menstrual cycles may benefit from lifestyle changes to reduce the risk of NAFLD as well as other cardiometabolic diseases,” Ryu said.

Other authors of this study include: In Young Cho, Yoosoo Chang, Jae-Heon Kang, Yejin Kim, Eunju Sung, and Hocheol Shin of Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine in Seoul, South Korea; Sarah Wild from the University of Edinburgh in Edinburgh, UK; and Christopher Byrne of the University of Southampton and University Hospital of Southampton in Southampton, UK

The study received funding from Sungkyunkwan University and the NIHR Center for Biomedical Research in Southampton.

The manuscript, “Long or Irregular Menstrual Cycles and Risk of Prevalent and Incident Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease”, was published online, ahead of print.

# # #

Endocrinologists are at the heart of solving the most pressing health issues of our time, from diabetes and obesity to infertility, bone health and hormone-related cancers. The Endocrine Society is the world’s oldest and largest organization of scientists dedicated to hormone research and physicians who care for people with hormone-related diseases.

The Society has more than 18,000 members, including scientists, doctors, educators, nurses and students in 122 countries. To learn more about the Society and the field of endocrinology, visit our site atwww.endocrine.org. Follow us on Twitter at @TheEndoSociety and @EndoMedia.

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Liver Disease: Stages, Symptoms, Lifestyle Changes to Adapt and Prevent It | Health https://rogalevich.org/liver-disease-stages-symptoms-lifestyle-changes-to-adapt-and-prevent-it-health/ Mon, 28 Feb 2022 07:54:06 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/liver-disease-stages-symptoms-lifestyle-changes-to-adapt-and-prevent-it-health/ In addition to removing toxins and other chemical wastes from the blood, the liver is also responsible for continuously filtering the blood circulating through the body and converting nutrients and drugs absorbed through the digestive tract into chemicals ready for use. ‘use. The liver is one of the largest and most extraordinary organs in the […]]]>

In addition to removing toxins and other chemical wastes from the blood, the liver is also responsible for continuously filtering the blood circulating through the body and converting nutrients and drugs absorbed through the digestive tract into chemicals ready for use. ‘use. The liver is one of the largest and most extraordinary organs in the body because it is a super organ that performs countless health functions while all other organs have specific or limited functions.

So far, more than 500 functions have been attributed to the liver, and scientists say more may be discovered over time. The most important function of the liver is the processing of everything we consume, be it food, alcohol, drugs or poisons and the liver is damaged by all the toxins we consume. Blood infections also reach the liver and inflict damage while many other disease processes, inflammations and diseases including cancer in other organs also target the liver.

Symptoms:

In an interview with HT Lifestyle, Dr. Gaurav Chaubal, Program Director of Liver, Pancreas and Bowel Transplantation and HPB Surgery at Global Hospital, Parel, Mumbai, listed the possible symptoms one should not never avoid. They understand:

1. Yellowing of the skin and eyeballs (jaundice)

2. Pain in the upper right part of the abdomen.

3. Abdominal swelling (ascites)

4. Nausea.

5. A general feeling of unease (malaise)

6. Disorientation or confusion. (hepatic encephalopathy)

7. Drowsiness.

5 stages of liver disease:

Explaining that fatty liver disease is an accumulation of fat in the liver that can damage the liver and gradually progress to liver failure, Dr. Sulaiman Ladhani, Consultant Doctor of Thoracology and MD Chest and Tuberculosis at Masina Hospital, Byculla, Mumbai, explained: “It can be due to either excessive alcohol consumption or non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. It mainly occurs in overweight or obese people. Diabetic patients are at greater risk of having fatty liver disease.

He added: “Fatty liver is the result of abnormal merabolism and excess calories, fat taken in from food which is transported to the liver and eventually stored in the liver as fat. There are no symptoms of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which is why it is called a silent disease. It is usually identified by coincidence during an ultrasound or a fibroscan.

Dr. Sulaiman Ladhani and Dr. Gaurav Chaubal talked about the different stages of liver disease or fatty liver disease. They are:

Stage 1. Simple foie gras – This happens when the liver begins to accumulate fat. There is no inflammation or scarring in the liver at this stage. There are no symptoms in the early stage. Thus, many people are unaware that they have a fatty liver. For many people, fatty liver disease does not progress with an unhealthy liver. With a healthy diet and regular physical activity, excess fat in the liver can be reduced. It is observed that about 10 to 20% of people with this simple fatty liver disease will go on to the next stage.

Stage 2: Inflammation – Hepatitis steato occurs when the accumulation of fat in liver cells is accompanied by a certain amount of inflammation. It affects approximately 5% of the population. If the amount of damaged tissue increases, the liver may eventually struggle to repair it fast enough. During this phase, ongoing damage to liver cells from a number of agents and diseases causes the liver to enlarge, and the person experiences abdominal pain in the upper right corner. During this stage, the condition may be treatable. However, in people with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, there may not be significant symptoms.

Stage 3: Fibrosis/Scarring – If the inflammation seen in Stage 1 is not controlled, liver tissue slowly begins to heal and scarred tissue begins to replace healthy liver tissue. The condition is called fibrosis. Here there is persistent scar tissue in the liver and in the blood vessels around the liver. The liver can still function quite well at this stage, and removing or treating the cause of the inflammation can prevent further progression or reverse some of the damage. However, if scar tissue begins to replace much of the normal tissue, liver function gradually begins to be affected. During this phase, proper medications and lifestyle changes can reverse the condition to some degree.

Stage 4: Cirrhosis of the liver – At this point the healing is complete and there is no possibility of the liver healing itself now. At this point the liver stops working properly and symptoms include jaundice where the eyes and fingernails start to turn yellow, a dull ache in the lower part of the ribs, or abdominal distension due to fluid buildup in the belly. The person begins to lose appetite, weight loss occurs, and other organs may be affected such as the kidneys, brain, and heart. Scar tissue in cirrhosis is difficult to remove, although further progression can be halted if the positive agent is removed. Most people have an early stage of the disease which is simple fatty liver disease or steato. Only a small number move on to the next steps.

Stage 5: End-stage liver disease (ESLD) – Liver failure is of 2 types – acute liver failure occurs quickly with a duration of 48-72 hours and is usually caused by reasons other than alcohol, while chronic liver failure takes a long time to develop. happen and is often caused by alcohol abuse, uncontrolled diabetes, hypertension or obesity. Other more common reasons are viral hepatitis, autoimmune diseases and certain metabolic diseases. Cognitive or mental health is also affected and the person often feels confused or disoriented. ESLD is usually fatal.

Stage 6: Liver cancerThis results in liver cancer which can occur at any time in the liver and for reasons other than liver disease (primary liver cancer). It can also develop during any of the 4 stages above and is not necessarily the last in the sequence. Just like ESLD, liver cancer is also fatal unless the tumor is removed, resected, or a liver transplant is performed.

Everything you need to know about liver transplantation:

Dr Gaurav Chaubal said: “Overall, a liver transplant is needed in three scenarios. First, when cirrhosis of the liver progresses and symptoms worsen despite medical treatment. Second, when other organs also begin to be involved due to cirrhosis, namely the brain, kidneys, and coagulation. Third, when liver cancer develops against the background of cirrhosis of the liver.

Dr. Akash Shukla, Director of Hepatology at Sir HN Reliance Foundation Hospital, revealed that after liver transplantation, there are 3 things that can affect long-term results and therefore need to be taken care of. He pointed out: “First, the drugs used to prevent rejection and make sure the body accepts the liver, these are called immunosuppressive drugs, initially there are 3 drugs and they gradually reduce to one drug per day beyond 1 year from transplant, but this one pill should be continued indefinitely. There is no restriction on how long the new liver will last, if proper medications are taken. It can last a very long time.”

He added: ‘The second important precaution a person should take is to prevent infection. The risk of infection is highest during the first 3 months, and during this period one should avoid unnecessary contact with people, live in a hygienic environment and eat well-cooked or very clean food. However, there is no need for complete isolation, and normal life activities can be continued, beyond 3 months the risk of infection drops significantly and is generally not a problem unless there is major exposure to infectious microbes.

The third point to consider, according to Dr. Akash Shukla, is to take care of the other organs of the body. He pointed out, “Although the liver is doing very well, in the long term we need to take care of other organs in the body and important metabolic fictions like controlling diabetes, blood pressure and ischemic heart disease by changing the mode living in a healthy lifestyle. lifestyle and nutritious diet. In addition, we must be extremely vigilant about the development of cancers in people who have received an organ transplant and for this, a regular visit to the doctor and screening for cancers, in particular head and neck cancers and skin cancers, are extremely important for the longevity of people after transplants.

Tips for preventing liver disease:

According to Dr. Sulaiman Ladhani, all stages of the liver are associated with an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease such as heart attack and stroke before liver failure occurs. Therefore, maintaining a healthy diet and limiting sugar intake, quitting smoking and alcohol consumption, and exercising will help in the long run.

He advised: “Vitamin E is useful in preventing further progression. It is very important to have more clarity on this subject. Diet modification and calorie reduction, avoiding fast foods, carbonated drinks and heavy meals should be done. Having healthy meals and increasing the physical movement of the body as advised by the doctor is imperative. Regular liver tests and appropriate medications are essential. The progression of the disease is slow, therefore, the lifestyle is managed with proper diet as this can help prevent the disease from progressing further.

Echoing the same, Dr Gaurav Chaubal suggested: “Making small changes to your lifestyle and eating habits, such as – starting your day off right by eating a healthy breakfast, reducing salt and fat intake, avoiding too many processed or junk foods, detoxifying your system by taking plenty of fluids, indulging in healthy snacks including plenty of fruits and vegetables in your diet, avoiding excessive alcohol consumption and daily exercise are some of the ways to prevent liver disease.

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Should I get tested for COVID-19 if I have a sore throat? https://rogalevich.org/should-i-get-tested-for-covid-19-if-i-have-a-sore-throat/ Thu, 24 Feb 2022 04:52:28 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/should-i-get-tested-for-covid-19-if-i-have-a-sore-throat/ What are the potential complications of COVID-19? About 80% of people infected with COVID-19 experience mild to moderate symptoms and can recover without requiring hospitalization. However, about 15% become seriously ill and need oxygen. About 5% become seriously ill and require immediate medical attention. COVID-19 has the potential to cause health complications and even death […]]]>

What are the potential complications of COVID-19?

About 80% of people infected with COVID-19 experience mild to moderate symptoms and can recover without requiring hospitalization. However, about 15% become seriously ill and need oxygen. About 5% become seriously ill and require immediate medical attention.

COVID-19 has the potential to cause health complications and even death in susceptible people. Complications include:

Older adults and those with the following conditions are at higher risk of complications from COVID-19:

Which organs can be damaged by COVID-19?

Lungs

COVID-19 can cause lung problems such as pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in severe cases.

Pneumonia: Pneumonia causes the lungs to swell and fill with fluid. This can lead to breathing difficulties, which can become so severe that hospitalization, oxygen therapy, and monitoring of oxygen saturation may be required. While most people recover from pneumonia without any long-term consequences, pneumonia caused by COVID-19 can be quite dangerous. Even after the infection clears, damage to the lungs can cause breathing problems that last for months, leading to further complications.

Acute respiratory distress: ARDS is a condition in which excess fluid builds up in the small air sacs of the lungs, causing blood oxygen levels to drop below normal (hypoxemia). In most cases of COVID-19, the virus sticks to the upper airways around the throat, triggering an immune response. In rare cases, however, the virus can cross the upper respiratory tract and enter the lungs and alveoli, resulting in ARDS, which usually appears 8 days after the first symptoms appear. Risk factors such as older age, diabetes, and high blood pressure increase the likelihood of having ARDS with COVID-19.

Heart

Underlying heart conditions such as hypertension, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease have been linked to poor outcomes in patients with COVID-19. Cardiovascular complications such as myocardial damage, heart failure and arrhythmias have also been associated with poor survival.

In a recent study, researchers detected cardiac abnormalities in 78% of patients with COVID-19, as well as ongoing myocardial inflammation in 60%. Although their heart function appeared to be preserved, elevated levels of the blood enzyme troponin (an indication of heart damage) were identified in 76% of patients. Notably, most people in the study did not require hospitalization.

Kidneys

Even patients who did not have kidney problems before COVID-19 infection have been shown to have kidney failure and tissue destruction after illness. According to some reports, up to 30% of COVID-19 patients admitted to hospitals in China and New York had moderate or severe kidney damage. Proteinuria or excess protein in the urine and abnormal blood components are both indicators of kidney failure.

Because the kidneys contain angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptors, they are vulnerable to COVID-19 infection. The virus triggers an immune response that can be aggressive and lead to a cytokine storm that destroys kidney cells.

Liver

Since the liver also contains ACE2 receptors, people with COVID-19 are at risk for liver damage. Some patients with COVID-19 have been shown to have higher levels of liver enzymes, such as alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST), which are signs of liver damage.

Patients diagnosed with COVID-19 who also have a history of cirrhosis (liver tissue damage) or pre-existing liver disease (chronic liver disease) are at higher risk of death.

The nervous system

There has been an increase in the frequency of COVID-19 patients reporting neurological symptoms such as brain inflammation, seizures and hallucinations.

According to a study published in JAMA Neurology by a group of Chinese doctors, more than a third of 214 COVID-19 patients in Wuhan who were hospitalized with severe symptoms had neurological symptoms. The most common symptoms were dizziness, headache, impaired consciousness, loss of taste and smell, and skeletal damage. According to the study, the most dangerous symptoms, although rare, were seizures and strokes.

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Hepatitis C patients cured with antiviral drugs are less likely to be hospitalized, need ER care for liver or other health problems https://rogalevich.org/hepatitis-c-patients-cured-with-antiviral-drugs-are-less-likely-to-be-hospitalized-need-er-care-for-liver-or-other-health-problems/ Fri, 18 Feb 2022 21:00:00 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/hepatitis-c-patients-cured-with-antiviral-drugs-are-less-likely-to-be-hospitalized-need-er-care-for-liver-or-other-health-problems/ Newswise – DETROIT (February 18, 2022) – Henry Ford Health System researchers, as part of a national hepatitis C collaboration, report that patients with chronic hepatitis C who are treated with antiviral drugs that work direct are less likely to be hospitalized or seek emergency care for liver and non-liver related health problems. The study, […]]]>

Newswise – DETROIT (February 18, 2022) – Henry Ford Health System researchers, as part of a national hepatitis C collaboration, report that patients with chronic hepatitis C who are treated with antiviral drugs that work direct are less likely to be hospitalized or seek emergency care for liver and non-liver related health problems.

The study, published online in Clinical Infectious Diseases, highlights the extraordinary effect of these new antivirals, which have been shown to cure hepatitis C in 98% of patients who take them. Patients are said to be cured when the virus is no longer detectable in their blood.

“The results of our study show that curing hepatitis C not only eliminates the virus, but also improves the overall health of patients,” said Stuart Gordon, MD, director of the division of hepatology at Henry Ford and author. principal of the study. “This is consistent with our previous studies which have shown that effective treatment of hepatitis C also reduces the risk of patients developing other health problems such as diabetes, kidney disease, strokes and seizures. heart.”

According to federal data, at least 2.4 million people are living with hepatitis C in the United States, and most are unaware they have the virus. As a result, they are at risk for life-threatening liver disease and cancer. Rates of new cases of liver cancer increased by 38% between 2003 and 2012.

The Henry Ford-led study was conducted in collaboration with researchers from the Geisinger Health System, Kaiser Permanente in Hawaii and Oregon, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. They include the Chronic Hepatitis Cohort Study, which collected and analyzed data from the four health systems to assess the impact of hepatitis C and B on the US population.

This observational study is believed to be the first to examine healthcare utilization involving hepatitis C patients with and without advanced liver disease treated with direct-acting antivirals, or DAAs.

The researchers analyzed data from 6,100 patients – half who were treated with DAAs and half who were not.

Antivirals are taken by mouth once a day for eight to 12 weeks. Side effects are mild to non-existent. Medications prevent the hepatitis C virus from multiplying in the body and can prevent long-term complications such as liver damage.

Main results of the study:

  • Patients treated with DAAs had lower hospitalization rates and shorter stays for liver and non-liver related health problems compared to those who did not receive DAAs.
  • Patients treated with DAAs had fewer emergency department visits for problems related to liver disease compared to those who did not receive DAAs.

The researchers did not quantify the potential cost savings in the study.

Still, Dr Gordon said the expected cost savings would be substantial. People cured of hepatitis C lead to a decrease in the incidence of chronic medical problems associated with the disease, he said.

“There are tangible benefits downstream from these antiviral treatments,” he said. “If you are cured of the virus, your general health will improve and you will be less likely to be hospitalized for another health condition.”

A one-time universal screening for hepatitis C is recommended for all adults 18 years of age and older, including pregnant women, with each pregnancy. Regular screening for hepatitis C is recommended for people with ongoing risk factors such as drug use with needles, on dialysis, and those born between 1945 and 1965.

Last year, Michigan lifted restrictions that prevented some people from accessing antiviral treatment. “Given the remarkable efficacy and benefits of these DAAs, all people with hepatitis C should be treated and treated promptly,” Dr. Gordon said.

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No recurring AIP attacks with Givlaari, small real-life study reports https://rogalevich.org/no-recurring-aip-attacks-with-givlaari-small-real-life-study-reports/ Wed, 16 Feb 2022 22:02:54 +0000 https://rogalevich.org/no-recurring-aip-attacks-with-givlaari-small-real-life-study-reports/ Almost all people with severe and recurrent acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) were free of symptomatic attacks after treatment with Givlaari (givosiran), a small real-world study has shown. Givlaari “significantly reduced the attack rate in our cohort, as 96% were attack-free at the time of the study,” the researchers wrote. Early treatment resulted in significantly better […]]]>

Almost all people with severe and recurrent acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) were free of symptomatic attacks after treatment with Givlaari (givosiran), a small real-world study has shown.

Givlaari “significantly reduced the attack rate in our cohort, as 96% were attack-free at the time of the study,” the researchers wrote.

Early treatment resulted in significantly better responses, allowing dosage reduction in some patients.

However, the study also confirmed the high prevalence of adverse events,”most of which are benign but can affect the patient’s quality of life, such as feveroften reported fatigue and nausea,” the team wrote.

Thus, they suggested that the The impact of Givlaari on urinary heme metabolites should be monitored monthly to allow for dose adjustments and an individual approach to treatment.

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The study, “Givosiran in acute intermittent porphyria: a personalized medicine approachwas published in the journal Molecular genetics and metabolism.

AIP is caused by a genetically inherited deficiency in HMBS, an enzyme that helps produce heme, a molecule essential for transporting oxygen in the body.

Although most people with HMBS mutations do not develop symptoms, acute attacks can occur due to activation of a related enzyme called ALAS1. It can be triggered by hormonal changes, infections, alcohol consumption, smoking, reduced calorie intake, and stress.

Activated ALAS1 leads to the accumulation of two heme precursors – delta-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and porphobilinogen (PBG) – in the liver, triggering symptoms such as abdominal pain with nausea and vomiting. and, in severe cases, convulsions, states of confusion and hallucinations.

Most patients will experience one or a few attacks in their lifetime, but less than 10% will develop recurrent symptoms. AIP patients and mutation carriers are also known to be at increased risk of developing high blood pressure and kidney and liver disease.

Givlaari, a therapy developed by Alnylam Pharmaceuticals and designed to suppress ALAS1, was recently approved for porphyrias that affect the liver, including AIP. In clinical trials, patients treated with monthly subcutaneous (under the skin) injections had significantly fewer acute attacks and lower levels of ALA and PBG in urine.

In this report, researchers from the University of Paris, together with collaborators from various sites across France, described the impact of Givlaari in 24 AIP patients, in whom the dosing frequency was adjusted according to the levels individual ALAs throughout their treatment.

“We decided to evaluate a personalized medicine approach based on each patient’s ALA level and follow up individually,” the team wrote.

Patients eligible for AIP experienced four or more attacks per year and/or were treated with heme arginate, a drug that suppresses porphyrin production, as a preventive measure. They initially received 2.5 mg/kg of Givlaari every month, regardless of early response, and were treated and followed for a median of 16 months (one year, three months).

At the time of analysis, Givlaari produced a sustained overall reduction in urinary ALA levels, which fell by a median of 89.9%. Notably, 23 of the 24 participants (95.8%) did not experience an acute attack.

Prior to treatment, urinary ALA levels ranged from 7.9 to 51.4 micromoles per millimole (mcmol/mmol) of creatinine, well above the normal maximum of 3 mcmol/mmol of creatinine. It should be noted that ALA values ​​are normalized to creatinine concentrations to account for differences in urine volume.

After treatment with Givlaari, 20 patients (83%) consistently had creatinine below 5 mcmol/mmol, and of these some measurements were below 3 mcmol/mmol creatinine. The other four individuals showed a moderate decrease in ALA levels.

One participant (patient 9) showed a limited (78.1%) and variable decrease in ALA, which never fell below 5 mcmol/mmol creatinine. She had regular attacks requiring heme arginate every four or six weeks and was given opioids to manage her daily abdominal pain. Three other patients with a partial response – a 51.5% to 76.9% drop in ALA levels – no longer had acute attacks.

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Givlaari |  News Porphyria |  illustration of a graph

Statistical analysis showed a significant positive association between the year of AIP onset and the reduction in ALA percentage, demonstrating that “treatment efficacy was better in patients whose disease course was the shortest,” the researchers wrote.

Clinicians adjusted the frequency of Givlaari administration based on monthly ALA measurements, which led to two distinct groups of patients: 14 (58%), who required Givlaari every three months or more frequently , due to moderate or unstable declines in ALA levels; and 10 (42%) who were treated less frequently and maintained low ALA levels.

“The heterogeneity [variability] individual responses over time strongly supports that personalized therapeutic adaptation is necessary,” the researchers wrote.

Among those who required more frequent treatment, there was either a moderate decrease in ALA or a rapid increase after starting Givlaari. There was an overall 82.8% drop in ALA levels on treatment in this group, with an average ALA level of 5.6 mcmol/mmol. Six of these patients were treated every two to three months, while eight received treatment every four to six weeks.

Patients treated less frequently had an overall reduction of 95.6% in ALA levels, which remained at an average of 1.4 mcmol/mmol. Dosing frequency ranged from four to 14 months (median 7.5 months), which was only expected when ALA levels increased. These people did not experience acute symptoms on Givlaari.

A higher injection frequency was more likely in those who had acute symptoms for a longer period. Consistently, there was a significant difference in the mean number of years since disease onset between patients requiring less or more frequent treatments (6.7 vs 19.6 years).

All participants reported at least one adverse event. Elevated ALT levels, a sign of liver damage, were documented in eight patients (32%), occurring within the first six months of treatment in all but one case. Fatigue was felt in 17 (68%), nausea in 10 (40%), and six (24%) had increased hair loss and/or spontaneous nail loss.

A moderate and short-lasting increase in blood creatinine levels, a sign of impaired renal function, was observed in 91% of patients. High levels of homocysteine, which can damage blood vessels, were present in all 23 patients with measurements. Homocysteine ​​levels tended to increase with treatment (median increase 305%).

One patient experienced a serious adverse event leading to study discontinuation after four months due to acute pancreatitis, a sudden inflammation of the pancreas. Another patient was interrupted for 2.5 months due to a marked increase in pancreatitis markers and then resumed at a lower dose without relapse. Other serious adverse events included elevated liver enzyme levels, pulmonary embolism and decline in kidney function.

“In our cohort under [Givlaari] treatment, all but one (95.8%) severe AIP patients, defined as 4 or more acute attacks per year or requiring heme arginate prophylaxis, were acute attack free,” the authors wrote. . “The long-lasting treatment effect in some patients allowed us to reduce the frequency of administration under close monitoring of heme precursor levels without reduction in biological or clinical efficacy.”

“Early treatment with [Givlaari] was associated with a better biological response and allowed us to decrease dosing frequency,” they wrote.

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